Ag Notes



WILL - Ag Notes - November 13, 2014

Farm Assets Conference - November 24, 2014

Marriott Hotel & Conference Center
201 Broadway St, Normal, IL 61761

This is a new signature event for WILLAg. 

The WILLAg Farm Assets Conference sponsored in part by the Farm Credit System hopes to provide farmers and landowners decision​making tools for their business assets. The $25 registration fee includes the noon meal. Those attending can expect to hear pricing information on agricultural commodities from WILLAg’s regular ON AIR experts, learn how the new farm bill might impact crop insurance decisions going forward, to effectively analyze and choose between the new federal ARC and PLC programs, and explore the value of farm land. 

BUY TICKETS ONLINE AT THIS LINK or call 800-898-1065

10:15am Doors Open

CASH GRAIN Panel Discussion
Greg Johnson, The Andersons - Champaign, Illinois
Matt Bennett, Channel Seeds - Windsor, Illinois
Aaron Curtis, MIDCO - Bloomington, Illinois
Bill Mayer, Strategic Farm Marketing - Champaign, Illinois

CROP INSURANCE & RISK MANAGEMENT
Gary Schnitkey, Farm Management Specialist - University of Illinois

UPDATING LAND VALUES & RENTAL RATES
Bruce Sherrick, Director Center for Farmland Research - University of Illinois

SOYBEAN Panel Discussion
Pete Manhart, Bates Commodities - Normal, Illinois
Bill Gentry, Risk Management Commodities - Lafayette, Indiana
Ellen Dearden, AgReview - Morton, Illinois
Wayne Nelson, L & M Commodities - New Market, Indiana

EVALUATING THE NEW FARM BILL PROGRAMS
Jonathan Coppess, Agricultural Policy Specialist - University of Illinois

CORN Panel Discussion
Curt Kimmel, Bates Commodities - Normal, Illinois
Jacquie Voeks, Stewart Peterson - Champaign, Illinois
Dan Zwicker, CGB Enterprises - Mandeville, Louisiana
Mike Zuzolo, Global Commodity Analytics & Consulting - Atchison, Kansas

5:00pm Program Ends

Sponsors - Farm Credit Illinois & 1st Farm Credit

Categories: Agriculture

WILL - Ag Notes - November 13, 2014

Transportation is the Opportunity & the Problem

by Todd E. Gleason

Agricultural commodity prices in the United States have been moved more than usual over the past couple of years by transportation issues. University of Illinois Ag Economist Darrel Good says the railroad is pushing basis prices sharply lower and sharply higher. It may provide marketing opportunities.

Categories: Agriculture

WILL - Ag Notes - November 10, 2014

USDA Reports Provide Some Surprises, Particularly for Corn

by Darrel Good - University of Illinois

Based on the worn adage that “big crops get bigger”, analysts generally expected the USDA’s November Crop Production report to contain larger forecasts for the size of the current U.S. corn and soybean harvest. The soybean production forecast was larger, but the corn forecast was smaller than the October forecast.

The U.S. soybean crop is now forecast at 3.958 billion bushels, 31 million bushels larger than the October forecast. The U.S. average yield is forecast at 47.5 bushels, 0.4 bushel larger than the October forecast. Yield forecasts changed by a bushel or two for the majority of states, with smaller forecasts in six of the 29 states. Production forecasts were not changed for the rest of the world.  In the November WASDE report

Categories: Agriculture





WILL - Ag Notes - October 29, 2014

Ag Census Mapping Tool Makes Data Visual

by Todd E. Gleason

Every five years the United States Department of Agriculture takes a census. USDA NASS collects all kinds of data about farm production in the U.S.A. The agency has developed a tool to map this data. It is a way to visualize agricultural production, income, wealth distribution, management type, and the demographics of farmers. These three maps show the primary growing regions for corn, soybean, and wheat. The darkest green areas represent acres where the cropland is at least 45 percent sown to the crop listed. The corn belt is easy to see, and not that much of a surprise. However, the primary soybean growing regions of the nation are bit more diverse than you might expect and seem to follow the Mississippi Valley watershed from New Orleans to St. Louis, along the Ohio River Valley and the mighty Missouri River.
 

Categories: Agriculture

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