Ag Notes

WILL - Ag Notes - March 29, 2014

March 2014 USDA Hogs & Pigs

by Todd E. Gleason

USDA has released the March 2014 Quarterly Hogs & Pigs report. It, by most accounts, shows more inventory than the trade expected. However, the figures reported do show an impact from PED-V. This impact is, simply put, not as dramatic as the price rise has been in lean hog futures. The futures are still looking forward to what most expect to be a short market ready supply of hogs in April, May, June, and July. The following is excerpted from USDA's March 28, 2014 Quarterly Hogs & Pigs report.

United States Hog Inventory Down 3 Percent

United States inventory of all hogs and pigs on March 1, 2014 was 62.9 million head. This was down 3 percent from March 1, 2013, and down 5 percent from December 1, 2013.

Quarterly Hogs and Pigs Inventory – United States: March 1

Breeding inventory, at 5.85 million head, was up slightly from last year, and up 2 percent from the previous quarter. Market hog inventory, at 57.0 million head, was down 4 percent from last year, and down 5 percent from last quarter.

The December 2013-February 2014 pig crop, at 27.3 million head, was down 3 percent from 2013. Sows farrowing during this period totaled 2.87 million head, up 3 percent from 2013. The sows farrowed during this quarter represented 50 percent of the breeding herd. The average pigs saved per litter was 9.53 for the December-February period, compared to 10.08 last year. Pigs saved per litter by size of operation ranged from 7.70 for operations with 1-99 hogs and pigs to 9.60 for operations with more than 5,000 hogs and pigs.


Quarterly Litter Rate - United States

United States hog producers intend to have 2.88 million sows farrow during the March-May 2014 quarter, up 2 percent from the actual farrowings during the same period in 2013, but down 2 percent from 2012. Intended farrowings for June-August 2014, at 2.96 million sows, are up 2 percent from 2013, and up 1 percent from 2012.

The total number of hogs under contract owned by operations with over 5,000 head, but raised by contractees, accounted for 48 percent of the total United States hog inventory, up from 47 percent last year.

Categories: Agriculture

WILL - Ag Notes - March 25, 2014

Cost to Produce Corn and Soybeans in Illinois-2013

excerpt from the farmdocdaily website.

In 2013, the total of all economic costs per acre for growing corn in Illinois averaged $1,033 in the northern section, $966 in the central section for farmland with "high" soil ratings, $951 in the central section for farmland with "low" soil ratings, and $872 in the southern section.  Soybean costs per acre were $727, $715, $673 and $631, respectively (see Table 1).  Costs were lower in southern Illinois primarily because of lower land costs.  The total of all economic costs per bushel in the different sections of the state ranged from $4.90 to $5.20 for corn and from $12.32 to $12.88 for soybeans.  Variations in this cost were related to weather, yields, and land quality. 

Categories: Agriculture






WILL - Ag Notes - March 05, 2014

WILLAg All Day Ag Outlook

March 4, 2014

Here you may watch the six presentations made at the All Day Ag Outlook. The event has been held at the Beef House in Covington, Indiana during the month of March since 1991. University of Illinois Extension's Todd Gleason emcee'd the event. The program was arranged by Illinois Public Media Director of Agriculture Dave Dickey.

NOTE - the Farm Bill video has yet to be added to the list.

Categories: Agriculture

WILL - Ag Notes - February 27, 2014

Team Converts Sugarcane to Cold-Tolerant Oil-Producing Crop

by Stephanie Henry - U of I ACES

A team of researchers led by the University of Illinois reports that it can increase sugarcane’s geographic range, boost its photosynthetic rate by 30 percent, and turn it into an oil-producing crop for biodiesel production. These are only the first steps in a bigger initiative that will turn sugarcane and sorghum – two of the most productive crop plants known – into even more productive, oil-generating plants. “Biodiesel is attractive because, for example, with soybean, once you’ve pressed the oil out it’s fairly easy to convert it to diesel,” said Stephen P. Long, a University of Illinois plant biology researcher and leader of the initiative. “You could do it in your kitchen.”

But soybean isn’t productive enough to meet the nation’s need for

Categories: Agriculture

WILL - Ag Notes - February 25, 2014

Controlling Costs with Lower Crop Revenue: Cash Rents

by Gary Schnitkey, Extension Farm Business Farm Management, University of Illinois

Current projections put corn and soybean prices at much lower levels compared to prices between 2010 and 2012. Non-land costs are not projected to come down by the same amounts as revenues have declined. Current projections place operator and farmland returns below average cash rents, leading to the need to adjust cash rents down.

Categories: Agriculture

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