Ag Notes

WILL - Ag Notes - November 21, 2014

Monday November 24, 2014

Farm Assets Conference

When to Arrive
Doors open at 10:15am. Program starts at 11:00am. Lunch is at 11:50am.

Where
Marriott Hotel & Conference Center
201 Broadway Street
Normal, Illinois

Map - https://goo.gl/maps/K9VEQ

Parking
Park in the deck to the south of the building. There is a connecting bridge to the hotel. Our conference is on the first floor. We’ll give you further directions about exiting the deck during the conference. Parking will be free.

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U.S. EPA Delays 2014 RFS Rulemaking

Scott Irwin, University of Illinois Ag Economist specializing in the Renewable Fuels Standard, discusses the U.S. EPA announcement to delay an RFS decision until 2015.

U.S. EPA’s Janet McCabe - she’s an Acting Assistant Administrator - today signed a document and submitted it for publication in the Federal Register… that’s the document of record in Washington, D.C. The document says U.S. EPA will not finalize rule making for the 2014 RFS before the end of the calendar year. The agency was supposed to wrap that up at the beginning of the calendar year, but became mired in policy and technical issues related to changes proposed about a year ago. 

It now says the 2014 rules will be made before or in conjunction with the 2015 announcement. 

Logistically there are some log jams that will need to be dealt with related to RINs certificates from 2012. Those expire after two years. EPA says it will extend the expiration, but that the certificates will be in limbo until a new way to move them can be developed. 

So, again the big news in at the ag world today is related to ethanol. U.S. EPA has decided it will not make an RFS announcement for compliance and usage numbers until sometime in 2015. 

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LAND AUCTIONS

Murray Wise is the CEO of Murray Wise Associates. He discusses three Illinois farm land sales with Todd Gleason in this report recorded Thursday November 20, 2014.

Categories: Agriculture


WILL - Ag Notes - November 13, 2014

Transportation is the Opportunity & the Problem

by Todd E. Gleason

Agricultural commodity prices in the United States have been moved more than usual over the past couple of years by transportation issues. University of Illinois Ag Economist Darrel Good says the railroad is pushing basis prices sharply lower and sharply higher. It may provide marketing opportunities.

Categories: Agriculture

WILL - Ag Notes - November 10, 2014

USDA Reports Provide Some Surprises, Particularly for Corn

by Darrel Good - University of Illinois

Based on the worn adage that “big crops get bigger”, analysts generally expected the USDA’s November Crop Production report to contain larger forecasts for the size of the current U.S. corn and soybean harvest. The soybean production forecast was larger, but the corn forecast was smaller than the October forecast.

The U.S. soybean crop is now forecast at 3.958 billion bushels, 31 million bushels larger than the October forecast. The U.S. average yield is forecast at 47.5 bushels, 0.4 bushel larger than the October forecast. Yield forecasts changed by a bushel or two for the majority of states, with smaller forecasts in six of the 29 states. Production forecasts were not changed for the rest of the world.  In the November WASDE report

Categories: Agriculture





WILL - Ag Notes - October 29, 2014

Ag Census Mapping Tool Makes Data Visual

by Todd E. Gleason

Every five years the United States Department of Agriculture takes a census. USDA NASS collects all kinds of data about farm production in the U.S.A. The agency has developed a tool to map this data. It is a way to visualize agricultural production, income, wealth distribution, management type, and the demographics of farmers. These three maps show the primary growing regions for corn, soybean, and wheat. The darkest green areas represent acres where the cropland is at least 45 percent sown to the crop listed. The corn belt is easy to see, and not that much of a surprise. However, the primary soybean growing regions of the nation are bit more diverse than you might expect and seem to follow the Mississippi Valley watershed from New Orleans to St. Louis, along the Ohio River Valley and the mighty Missouri River.
 

Categories: Agriculture

WILL - Ag Notes - October 24, 2014

Scout Weeds from the Combine Cab

Posted on Oct 21, 2014 by Aaron Hager

Fall-Applied Herbicides: Which Weed Species Should be the Target?

Herbicides applied in the fall often can provide improved control of many winter annual weed species compared with similar applications made in the spring.  Marestail is one example of a weed species that is often better controlled with herbicides applied in the fall compared with the spring.  An increasing frequency of marestail populations in Illinois are resistant to glyphosate, and within the past year we have confirmed that resistance to ALS-inhibiting herbicides also is present in Illinois populations.  Targeting emerged marestail with higher application rates of products such as 2,4-D in the fall almost always

Categories: Agriculture

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