Backyard Industry


WILL - Backyard Industry - July 17, 2014

Eat Them to Beat Them

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(Duration: 4:54)

A branch of unripe autumn olives

In this episode of Backyard Industry, Lisa Bralts explores the concept of foraging and eating particular invasive species, like the autumn olive, as one way of slowing them down.


WILL - Backyard Industry - July 02, 2014

Tour de Coop

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(Duration: 4:03)

Chickens in a chicken coop.

As of January 2014, backyard chickens are legal in Champaign, Illinois. What better way to introduce curious friends and neighbors to the concept than to have an open house... for your chicken coop? It seems other wheels are turning, too... Backyard Industry's Lisa Bralts investigates.


WILL - Backyard Industry - June 04, 2014

Backyard Industry Video 2.0: Wool Gathering

A woman's hand is shown shearing a sheep.

Ever wondered where the wool your sweater's made out of comes from? All wool is shorn by a person - it's one task that isn't automated! In this, the second video by the Backyard Industry team, Lisa Bralts learns a thing or two (and gets her hands on some clippers) while visiting Seven Sisters Farm in Sidney, Illinois. 


WILL - Backyard Industry - June 03, 2014

Urbana Bestiary

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(Duration: 5:20)

A muskrat swims up a creek.

Brushes with urban wildlife are mostly unplanned and often unwanted occurrences. In this episode of Backyard Industry, Lisa Bralts connects with Environmental Almanac's Rob Kanter to have some planned and wanted face time with local fauna - and the local fauna delivers.


WILL - Backyard Industry - May 01, 2014

Life Preserver

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(Duration: 4:22)

Three jars of pickled asparagus with a cookbook

Food preservation is mostly associated with instructions that must be followed to the letter (OR ELSE) and a crazy frenzy of production during the peak of the growing season. Backyard Industry's Lisa Bralts has found a cookbook that not only makes the process seem less intimidating, it also soothes with terrific stories and photos, gently encourages production year round, and reminds the reader they don't have to grow it all. 


WILL - Backyard Industry - April 23, 2014

Wiggle Room

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(Duration: 4:44)

A handful of red wiggler worms.

Backyard Industry's Lisa Bralts has always been a fan of the worms working in her compost pile at home. It turns out the folks at the Sustainable Student Farm on the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign campus are fans, as well, but on a much larger scale. 



WILL - Backyard Industry - December 19, 2013

Mint Condition

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(Duration: 6:14)

A page from a homemade cookbook.

It's not often Lisa Bralts gets three generations of women in one room (with extra family members) to talk about anything, much less a particular type of homemade Christmas candy they make - candy that is immediately adored by anyone who tries it. But that's exactly what happened when she visited with the Delaney-Snyder women in this episode of In My Backyard.

 

Mint Patties:

1 (8-oz) package cream cheese, room temperature

1/2 teaspoon peppermint oil

2 lbs. powdered sugar
Food coloring (optional)

Beat the cream cheese until creamy, then beat in the extract. Beat in the powdered sugar until well blended.  Depending on your mixer, you may have to use your hands to fully incorporate the sugar.  The mixture will be smooth and like a stiff dough. Add a few drops of food coloring if desired. Pinch off small amounts of dough (rounded teaspoon). Roll into a ball then press flat with your palm or a glass. Place on wax-paper lined baking sheet and freeze, uncovered, for an hour. Melt a 12-oz bag of semi-sweet chocolate chips with small amount of paraffin (1 X 2 inch block) and drop the peppermint patties in one at a time, turning and lifting out with a fork or toothpick. Quickly tap off excess and use another fork or your finger to help slide the dipped patty onto another waxed paper-lined baking sheet. Once all patties are dipped, place baking sheet in refrigerator until chocolate is set, about 15-30 minutes. Store in airtight container and keep refrigerated or frozen.

Categories: Agriculture, Food


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