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WILL - Focus - June 22, 2012

Cameras and Photography

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(Duration: 55:01)

Brian K. Johnson, Professor of Journalism, College of Media, University of Illinois

Host: David Inge

We’ll be taking your questions on cameras and photography as we welcome back to the show Brian Johnson, professor of journalism at the University of Illinois. From time to time he stops by and we talk about the changing technology of picture taking.  We can take questions on equipment and also technique. Whether you are a pro or a serious hobbyist, you shoot film or digital, your call will be welcome.

Categories: Art and Culture, How-to

WILL - Focus - June 22, 2012

Our Divided Political Heart: The Battle for the American Idea in an Age of Discontent

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(Duration: 50:16)

E. J. Dionne Jr., Columnist for the Washington Post; Senior Fellow, Brookings Institution; and University Professor, the Foundations of Democracy and Culture, Georgetown University

Host: David Inge

Our guest will be political commentator E.J. Dionne. In his new book "Our Divided Political Heart," he tries to make sense of the current unhappiness that runs through American politics. He says our discontent is rooted in our inability agree on who we are.  American history, he says, is defined by the tension between two core values, love of individualism and reverence for community. He says we need to remember our greatness has always depended on a balance between our two core values.

Categories: History, Politics

WILL - Focus - June 21, 2012

Talk with the Gastroenterologist

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(Duration: 48:09)

Claudia Nugent, M.D., Gastroenterologist, Christie Clinic

Host: David Inge

Over 95 million Americans experience some kind of digestive problem. While these problems are more common as people get older, they can occur at any age, even in children. Our guest will be Dr. Claudia Nugent, gastroenterologist at Christie Clinic. We’ll talk about some of the most common GI problems, including reflux disease, ulcers and colorectal cancer. Your questions will be welcome, too.

Categories: Health

WILL - Focus - June 21, 2012

Exit: The Endings That Set Us Free

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(Duration: 48:40)

Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot, Ph.D., Emily Hargroves Fisher Professor of Education, Graduate School of Education, Harvard University

Host: David Inge

Saying goodbye is an unavoidable part of life. Some goodbyes are small, but sociologist Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot says the small goodbyes teach us how to handle the major transitions. But, she says, there are few lessons in our culture, our schooling or our socialization in how to gracefully take our leave. Sara Lawrence Lightfoot will be our guest and we’ll talk about making the movement away from the old, a step forward, even when it feels like a retreat. That’s the subject of her book,  "Exit: The Endings that Set Us Free."

Categories: Cultural Studies

WILL - Focus - June 20, 2012

Nanoscience and Technology

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(Duration: 51:55)

Irfan S. Ahmad, Ph.D., Executive Director, Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, University of Illiniois

Yi Lu, Ph.D., Jay and Ann Schenck Professor of Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois

Host: David Inge

Many scientists believe that nanotechnology, a field that involves engineering on a very small scale, has great potential to change both our economy and the way we live.  At the nanoscale, materials we know well can have very different properties, making them valuable for a wide range of products. We’ll look at recent developments in this field here at the University of Illinois. We’ll have two guests, Irfan Ahmad, associate director of the Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, and Yi Lu, professor of chemistry.

Categories: Science, Technology

WILL - Focus - June 20, 2012

The Accordion Family: Boomerang Kids, Anxious Parents, and the Private Toll of Global Competition

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(Duration: 51:19)

Katherine S. Newman, Ph.D., James B. Knapp Dean of The Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, Johns Hopkins University

Host: David Inge
 

In the U.S. and in other affluent nations, growing numbers of young adults in their 20s and 30s are living with their parents. Sociologist Katherine Newman says that while this kind of doubling-up has long been seen in families that were less well-off, the middle class has never before needed to provide a long-term economic safety net for their grown children. We’ll explore this change with Katherine Newman, author of "The Accordion Family." The book looks at the ways global economic conditions have redefined family life.


WILL - Focus - June 19, 2012

The Locavore’s Dilemma: In Praise of the 10,000-Mile Diet

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(Duration: 50:26)

Pierre Desrochers, Ph.D., Mercatus Center Affiliated Scholar; Associate Professor of Geography, University of Toronto

Host: David Inge
 

When selecting food for their dinner table, more and more people are looking for food produced close to home in the hope that it will boost food security for all. But University of Toronto economic geographer Pierre Desrochers says that while that might seem like a good idea, it does very little to solve our serious global food problems. We’ll talk about his new book "The Locavore’s Dilemma." In the book, he takes on some of the key points of the “eat local” agenda, including the ideas that local food is better for us and for the environment.


WILL - Focus - June 19, 2012

The Unconquered: In Search of the Amazon’s Last Uncontacted Tribes

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(Duration: 51:37)

Scott Wallace, Journalist; Photographer; Speaker; Producer

Host: David Inge
 

The Arrow People live deep in the Amazon rainforest. They are one of the very last uncontacted tribes on the planet. Sydney Possuelo works for the government of Brazil. He is dedicated to protecting the Arrow People but in order to do that, he must enter their world, risking his life to defend their right to be left alone. Journalist Scott Wallace will tell us about the man and his mission, both profiled in the new book "The Unconquered: In Search of the Amazon’s Last Uncontacted Tribes."


WILL - Focus - June 18, 2012

The Man Who Never Died: The Life, Times and Legacy of Joe Hill, American Labor Icon

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(Duration: 55:25)

William Adler, Writer

Host: David Inge
 

This is a repeat broadcast from Wednesday, August 31, 2011, 11 am

In 1914, Joe Hill was convicted of murder in Utah and executed by a firing squad. The result was an international controversy. People around the world believed he was innocent, and that he had been convicted for just one reason--he was a member of the Industrial Workers of the World. In a program from the archives, William Adler tells the story of Joe Hill, the songwriter who became an American labor icon. That’s the subject of his book "The Man Who Never Died."

Categories: History

WILL - Focus - June 18, 2012

Home Care

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(Duration: 51:32)

Scott Spies, Home Inspector

Host: David Inge

Our topic will be home maintenance, and our guest will be Scott Spies from the Spies Home Inspection Service. We invite your questions on everything from windows and siding, to roofing and gutters, to attics and basements, just about anything that goes into the single-family home.

Categories: How-to

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