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WILL - Focus - November 08, 2012

Interview With Historian and Geographer David Harvey

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(Duration: 51:23)

Historian and Geographer David Harvey is a leading theorist in the field of urban studies, whom Library Journal called “one of the most influential geographers of the later twentieth century.”

He is a Distinguished Professor of The Graduate Center, CUNY, and Director of the Center for Place, Culture, and Politics, and the author of a number of books. His most recent work is Rebel Cities: From the Right to the City to the Urban Revolution.

David Harvey will give the Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities “Revolution” Theme Lecture on November 8, 2012, 7:30 p.m. at Foellinger Auditorium.


WILL - Focus - November 02, 2012

Living Color: The Biological and Social Meaning of Skin Color

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(Duration: 51:26)

Living Color investigates the social history of skin color from prehistory to the present, showing how our body’s most visible trait influences our social interactions in profound and complex ways. Nina G. Jablonski begins with the biology and evolution of skin pigmentation, explaining how skin color changed as humans moved around the globe. She explores the relationship between melanin pigment and sunlight, and examines the consequences of rapid migrations, vacations, and other lifestyle choices that can create mismatches between our skin color and our environment. This book explains why skin color has come to be a biological trait with great social meaning— a product of evolution perceived by culture. It considers how we form impressions of others, how we create and use stereotypes, how negative stereotypes about dark skin developed and have played out through history—including being a basis for the transatlantic slave trade. Offering examples of how attitudes about skin color differ in the U.S., Brazil, India, and South Africa, Jablonski suggests that a knowledge of the evolution and social importance of skin color can help eliminate color-based discrimination and racism.



WILL - Focus - August 01, 2012

The New Geography of Jobs

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(Duration: 55:01)

Enrico Moretti Ph.D., the Michael Peevey and Donald Vial Career Development Chair in Labor Economics, Department of Economics, University of California, Berkeley

Host: David Inge

Economist Enrico Moretti says that today there are three Americas. At one extreme are those cities with a strong innovation sector; at the other, cities once dominated by traditional manufacturing in the middle are cities that could go either way. And where you live, as well as who you are, will determine how successful you will be in the economy of tomorrow. We explore "The New Geography of Jobs"  with Enrico Moretti from the University of California at Berkeley.

This is a repeat broadcast from Thursday, May 24, 2012, 11 am

Categories: Economics, Geography

WILL - Focus - July 06, 2012

Why Nations Fail: The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty

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(Duration: 51:25)

Why are some nations rich and others poor? Many explanations have been offered: culture, geography, even weather. But MIT economist Daron Acemoglu says what matters most are the political and economic institutions made by people. We’ll hear more about the root causes behind success and failure and talk about what might be done to build widespread prosperity.

This is a repeat broadcast from Thursday, May 10, 2012, 10 am


WILL - Focus - June 05, 2012

Marco Polo: From Venice To Xanadu

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(Duration: 50:21)

Lawrence Bergreen, Writer

Host: David Inge

Marco Polo was only 17 when he set out for Asia with his father and uncle. By his return, 24 years later, he had traveled to places few Europeans had ever seen. He wanted his name to live forever as the greatest traveler of all time, but found it difficult to convince his fellow Venetians that he had actually done what he had claimed. In a program from the archives, Laurence Bergreen talks about the life of Marco Polo, one of the first Europeans to travel extensively through Asia.

This is a repeat broadcast from Thursday, January 17, 2008, 11 am

Categories: Geography, History

WILL - Focus - May 24, 2012

The New Geography of Jobs

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(Duration: 52:08)

Economist Enrico Moretti says that today there are three Americas. At one extreme are those cities with a strong innovation sector; at the other, cities once dominated by traditional manufacturing in the middle are cities that could go either way. And where you live, as well as who you are, will determine how successful you will be in the economy of tomorrow. We explore "The New Geography of Jobs"  with Enrico Moretti from the University of California at Berkeley.

Categories: Economics, Geography




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