August 01, 2012

Too Big To Know

Too Big To Know: Rethinking Knowledge Now That the Facts Aren't the Facts, Experts Are Everywhere, and the Smartest Person in the Room Is the Room

David Weinberger, Ph.D., Senior Researcher, Berkman Center for the Internet & Society, Harvard University

Host: David Inge

There was a time when knowledge rested in a small number of places. Today, there is more to know, and more places to find it than ever before. But has that made us smarter, or just more confused? Our guest will be David Weinberger from Harvard University’s Berkman Center for the Internet and Society. His book Too Big to Know looks at the ways that the Internet has made the world messier, but also richer in information. It’s an opportunity, he says, for us to become smarter than ever.

This is a repeat broadcast from Friday, January 13, 2012, 10 am


January 11, 2012

UC2B Broadband Internet Access for the Citizens of Champaign/Urbana

With Jon Gant, Ph.D. (Associate Professor, Graduate School of Library and Information Science, University of Illinois; Director for UC2B Canvassing Operations), and LaEisha Meaderds (Project Coordinator, Graduate School of Library and Information Science, UC2B Canvassing Operations, University of Illinois), and Deb Feinen, J.D. ( At Large Council Member from the City of Champaign, Chair of UC2B Policy Board ), and Brandon Bowersox-Johnson (Urbana City Council, Ward 4; Vice Chair, UC2B Policy Board)


October 03, 2005

Internet Governance

With Milton Mueller (Professor at Syracuse University School of Information Studies and Director int the School's Graduate Program in Telecommunications and Network Management)


March 04, 2005

On Intelligence

Guest: Jeff Hawkins.

The brain is not a computer, but a memory system, calling upon sequences of past events to make predictions for the future. This is what forms the basis of intelligence—and it is what most computers today lack. Today on Focus, we're joined by computer architect Jeff Hawkins to talk about how studying the human brain will allow us to revolutionize computing technology.


August 26, 2004

Dark Light: Electricity and Anxiety from the Telegraph to the X-ray

Guest: Linda Simon.

More than thirty years after Thomas Edison invented the light bulb, barely ten percent of American homes were wired for electricity. At the same time, electrotherapy emerged as a popular medical treatment for everything from depression to digestive problems. Why did Americans welcome electricity into their bodies, but not their homes? Today on Focus, Linda Simon joins us to talk about her new book Dark Light and its use of journalism and fiction to explore public anxiety and awe over electricity.


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