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WILL - Focus - December 04, 2012

Growing Up In Poverty

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(Duration: 51:16)

Nearly one out of every five children in Illinois is growing up in poverty, and in more than half of Illinois' counties, 1 out of every 4 kids experiences food insecurity. Nationwide, childhood poverty costs the country $500 billion a year, or 4 percent of GDP. In addition to the economic costs, there are high personal costs: children growing up in poverty face ongoing psychosocial stress that affects their health and development, from high blood pressure and impaired immune functioning to deteriorated connections in the brain. We’ll explore the effects of poverty on children, and what can be done to ameliorate those effects.


WILL - Focus - October 30, 2012

How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character

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(Duration: 51:31)

Paul Tough, Writer specializing in education, child development, poverty, and politics and contributor to "This American Life."

Host: Craig Cohen

Children's success in school is usually measured by test scores – the SAT, IQ test, standardized exams. But in How Children Succeed, writer and This American Life contributor Paul Tough argues that the qualities that matter most have more to do with character: skills like perseverance, curiosity, conscientiousness, optimism, and self-control. As scientists discover more about the longterm effects of early adversity on the developing brain, Tough argues that the ways parents can instill these qualities in children can have ramifications that last a lifetime.


WILL - Focus - October 11, 2012

Bullying Intervention and Prevention: What Works, What Doesn’t and What You Can Do

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(Duration: 51:27)

Dorothy Espelage, Professor, Educational Psychology, University of Illinois

Debra Chasnoff, Filmmaker, President and Senior Producer of GroundSpark, a film, education and advocacy organization

Host: Kimberlie Kranich

Most of us would agree that bullying and name-calling are harmful behaviors.  And most states have mandatory anti-bullying programs in their schools.  Which programs work?  Which ones don't?  What's the difference between prevention and intervention?  How can I talk to my child or my student about bullying? How can I talk about group-specific bullying, especially anti-gay bullying, at home and at school?

We'll offer some tips and provide you with resources as we talk about efforts to stop and prevent bulling in Illinois and around the nation with two guests:  Dorothy Espelage, Professor of Educational Psychology at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign and Debra Chasnoff, documentary filmmaker.

Dorothy Espelage has conducted research on bullying, homophobic teasing, sexual harassment, and dating violence for the last 18 years. She leads a team of undergraduates, graduate students and staff in an effort to make schools more safe.

Debra Chasnoff is an Academy Award-winning documentary filmmaker whose work has fueled progressive social-change movements in many fields. She is president and senior producer at GroundSpark, a national social justice media, advocacy, and education organization, and co-creator of The Respect for All Project, a program that produces media and training resources to help prevent prejudice among young people.


WILL - Focus - September 14, 2012

Children’s Health

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(Duration: 51:35)

Malcolm Hill, M.D., Pediatrician, Carle Physicians Group

Host: Craig Cohen

Our guest will be Dr. Malcolm Hill, pediatrician from Carle in Urbana. Dr. Hill can respond to a range of concerns, anything from vaccinations and common childhood illness, to coping with minor bumps and bruises.  Any problem you might discuss with your own family doctor is welcome on this show.


WILL - Focus - August 17, 2012

The Accordian Family: Boomerang Kids, Anxious Parents, and the Private Toll of Global Competition

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(Duration: 55:01)

Katherin S. Newman, Ph.D., James B. Knapp Dean of the Zanvyl Kieger School of Arts and Sciences, Johns Hopkins University

Host: David Inge

In the U.S. and in other affluent nations, growing numbers of young adults in their 20s and 30s are living with their parents. Sociologist Katherine Newman says that while this kind of doubling-up has long been seen in families that were less well-off, the middle class has never before needed to provide a long-term economic safety net for their grown children. We’ll explore this change with Katherine Newman, author of "The Accordion Family." The book looks at the ways global economic conditions have redefined family life.

This is a repeat broadcast from Wednesday, June 20, 2012, 10 am


WILL - Focus - June 20, 2012

The Accordion Family: Boomerang Kids, Anxious Parents, and the Private Toll of Global Competition

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(Duration: 51:19)

Katherine S. Newman, Ph.D., James B. Knapp Dean of The Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, Johns Hopkins University

Host: David Inge
 

In the U.S. and in other affluent nations, growing numbers of young adults in their 20s and 30s are living with their parents. Sociologist Katherine Newman says that while this kind of doubling-up has long been seen in families that were less well-off, the middle class has never before needed to provide a long-term economic safety net for their grown children. We’ll explore this change with Katherine Newman, author of "The Accordion Family." The book looks at the ways global economic conditions have redefined family life.


WILL - Focus - December 13, 2011

Schools and Obesity Prevention: A Regional Look

Schools and Obesity Prevention: A Regional Look

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(Duration: 52:49)

With Cheryl McIntire (Principal, Northeast Elementary School, Danville, Illinois), and Wendy Starwalt (Coordinator for Elementary Physical Education for Unit 4 Schools; Coordinator for the CATCH Program at Carrie Busey School, Champaign), and , and Craig Gundersen, Ph.D. (Professor, Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics, University of Illinois)



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