Focus

WILL - Focus - January 31, 2013

Immigration Reform

The move to overhaul the nation’s immigration system is gaining momentum in Washington, and President Obama has called that “good news.” Today on Focus: the current path to citizenship and the challenges and barriers it presents to immigrants.

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(Duration: 50:49)

Jeffrey Hays in the WILL studio

The move to overhaul the nation’s immigration system is gaining momentum in Washington, and President Obama has called that “good news.” This hour on Focus, we’ll talk about the current path to citizenship and the challenges and barriers it presents to immigrants. Guests include Jeffrey Hays, an immigration attorney at Erwin, Martinkus and Cole in Champaign and Ricardo Diaz of the Champaign-Urbana Immigration Forum. We’ll also check in with Felicia Sonmez of the Washington Post to get an update about what’s happening in Washington, and we’ll talk with Illinois Public Radio’s Statehouse Bureau Chief Amanda Vinicky about changes to Illinois’ immigrant driver’s license policy.

Do you think undocumented immigrants should be allowed to stay? What changes should be made to the US’s immigration policies? Join the conversation on Facebook at www.facebook.com/focus580 or on Twitter @Focus580.

Categories: Immigration, Politics

WILL - Focus - December 27, 2012

Interview with Journalist Jose Antonio Vargas

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(Duration: 50:33)

Since the beginning of his career in journalism eight years ago, Jose Vargas has written hundreds of stories — including covering the 2008 presidential campaign for The Washington Post; profiling Al Gore for Rolling Stone and Mark Zuckerberg for The New Yorker; writing and producing a documentary on the AIDS epidemic in the nation's capital; and winning a Pulitzer Prize for helping cover the Virginia Tech massacre.  A little over a year ago, Vargas wrote a groundbreaking essay in the New York Times Sunday Magazine revealing his "undocumented immigrant" status.  Since then, he founded Define American and has worked to facilitate dialogue about the DREAM Act and immigration issues.

This is a repeat broadcast from Friday, October 26, 2012, 10 am


WILL - Focus - October 26, 2012

Interview with Journalist Jose Antonio Vargas

Listen

(Duration: 50:33)

Interview with Journalist Jose Antonio Vargas

Host: David Inge

Since the beginning of his career in journalism eight years ago, Jose Vargas has written hundreds of stories — including covering the 2008 presidential campaign for The Washington Post; profiling Al Gore for Rolling Stone and Mark Zuckerberg for The New Yorker; writing and producing a documentary on the AIDS epidemic in the nation's capital; and winning a Pulitzer Prize for helping cover the Virginia Tech massacre.  A little over a year ago, Vargas wrote a groundbreaking essay in the New York Times Sunday Magazine revealing his "undocumented immigrant" status.  Since then, he founded Define American and has worked to facilitate dialogue about the DREAM Act and immigration issues.

On Friday, October 26th at 12:00 noon, the University YMCA will host Pulitzer Prize winning journalist José Antonio Vargas to talk about his experiences as an undocumented immigrant and how debate over immigration policies is shaping the 2012 election season.


WILL - Focus - August 14, 2012

Showdown in the Sonoran Desert: Religion, Law, and the Immigration Controversy

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(Duration: 55:01)

Ananda Rose, Ph.D., Journalist

Host: David Inge

Every day, people from Mexico risk their lives to enter the United States. Many become lost in the desert. A few Americans have taken steps to help these undocumented people who would otherwise die of exposure, but that puts them in direct conflict with their fellow citizens and with the U.S. government. Poet and journalist Ananda Rose traveled to the Southwest to talk with people on both sides of the issue, those motivated by compassion and those by law. She’ll tell us what she learned. It’s all in her book "Showdown in the Sonoran Desert."

This is a repeat broadcast from Wednesday, June 13, 2012, 11 am

Categories: Immigration

WILL - Focus - July 18, 2012

The Irish Way Becoming American in the Multiethnic City

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(Duration: 55:03)

James R. Barrett, Ph.D., Professor of History, History Department, University of Illinois

Host: Celeste Quinn

Historian James Barrett says America’s first ethnic group, its first immigrants, were the Irish.  As such, they laid the foundation for the immigrants who followed.  That foundation was at once hostile and welcoming. Barrett says, in the end, it led to a new sense of American identity that continues to influence today.

This is a repeat broadcast from Tuesday, April 17, 2012, 11 am


WILL - Focus - July 05, 2012

The Global Grapevine: Why Rumors of Terrorism, Immigration, and Trade Matter

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(Duration: 50:58)

Northwestern University Sociologist Gary Alan Fine has been studying rumors for over 35 years. He began by looking at the ways rumors affected race relations and made it so difficult for blacks and whites to get together. In his more recent work, he has looked at rumors that deal with international politics. He says rumors provide access to what people believe and the beliefs they keep hidden. Fine will share some ideas from his book "The Global Grapevine: Why Rumors of Terrorism, Immigration and Trade Matter."

This is a repeat broadcast from Friday, May 04, 2012, 10 am


WILL - Focus - June 13, 2012

Showdown in the Sonoran Desert: Religion, Law, and the Immigration Controversy

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(Duration: 51:41)

Ananda Rose, Ph.D., Poet; Journalist

Host: David Inge
 

Every day, people from Mexico risk their lives to enter the United States. Many become lost in the desert. A few Americans have taken steps to help these undocumented people who would otherwise die of exposure, but that puts them in direct conflict with their fellow citizens and with the U.S. government. Poet and journalist Ananda Rose traveled to the Southwest to talk with people on both sides of the issue, those motivated by compassion and those by law. She’ll tell us what she learned. It’s all in her book "Showdown in the Sonoran Desert."


WILL - Focus - May 28, 2012

Liberty’s Exiles: American Loyalists in the Revolutionary World

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(Duration: 55:01)

When the British left America after the Revolution it was cause for celebration, but not all Americans were pleased to see the redcoats sail away. Fearing for their safety, some 60,000 Americans who had remained loyal to the crown decided to leave and make new lives elsewhere in the British Empire. In a program from the archives, Harvard historian Maya Jasanoff talks about her book "Liberty’s Exiles: American Loyalists in the Revolutionary World." It explores the many ways that the loyalist diaspora helped Britain overcome a stinging defeat and go on to become a world power.

This is a repeat broadcast from Thursday, March 31, 2011, 11 am




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