WILL Highlights

WILL - WILL Highlights - July 23, 2014 ~ Comment (0)

The Ape Who Went to College

7 pm Wednesday, July 23, on WILL-TV: The story of an orangutan raised as a human child on an American university campus.

Chantek at 9 months

Part of the My Wild Affair series, this is the incredible story of Chantek, the orangutan raised as a human child on an American university campus during the 70s and 80s. Taught to speak in sign language, he is now living among his own kind at Zoo Atlanta, although he describes himself as an “orangutan person.”

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WILL - WILL Highlights - July 20, 2014 ~ Comment (0)

Hold your (literary) horses!

From classic Westerns to racy romances, horses carry so many beloved books. NPR tells you about 10 four-legged tales.

Herd of horses

WILL - WILL Highlights - July 17, 2014 ~ Comment (0)

Josefowicz plays Stranvinsky Violin Concerto

WILL-FM's Evening Concert, 7 pm Tuesday, July 29, with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra

Leila Josefowicz

Tuesday July 29:  Chicago Symphony Orchestra

Susanna Mälkki conducts La mer

Sibelius: Suite No. 1 from The Tempest
Stravinsky:  Violin Concerto in D Major (Leila Josefowicz, violin)
Thomas Adès (British, b. 1971):   but all shall be well
Debussy: La mer 
Dvorák:   The Water Goblin (Sir Mark Elder, conductor)
J.Williams: Excerpt from film score for Lincoln


WILL - WILL Highlights - July 16, 2014 ~ Comment (0)

Frontline: Losing Iraq

9 pm Tuesday, July 29, on WILL-TV: Frontline examines the unfolding chaos in Iraq: What went wrong? How did we get here? And what happens now?

Iraqi with face wrapped and gun

In a special developing report, Frontline examines the unfolding chaos in Iraq and how the U.S. is being pulled back into the conflict. Drawing on interviews with policymakers and military leaders, the investigative team traces the U.S. role from the 2003 invasion to the current violence — exploring how Iraq itself is coming undone, how we got here, what went wrong and what happens next.

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WILL - WILL Highlights - July 15, 2014 ~ Comment (0)

A Stellar Job on ‘Big Picture Science’

5 pm Saturday, July 26, on WILL-AM: Stars can tell us a lot about other celestial phenomena.

Hand giving thumbs up in front of a celestial body

The stars are out tonight. And they do more than just twinkle. These boiling balls of hot plasma can tell us something about other celestial phenomena. They betray the hiding places of black holes, for one. But they can also fool us. Find out why one of the most intriguing discoveries in astrobiology – that of the potentially habitable exoplanet Gliese 581g – may have been just a mirage.

Plus, the highest levels of ultraviolet light ever mentioned on Earth’s surface puzzles scientists: is it a fluke of nature, or something manmade?

And a physicist suggests that stars could be used by advanced aliens to send hailing signals deep into space.

Guests:

Paul Robertson – Postdoctoral fellow, Penn State Center for Exoplanets and Habitable Worlds
Mike Joner – Research professor of astronomy at Brigham Young University
Nathalie Cabrol – Planetary scientist, SETI Institute
Anthony Zee – Theoretical physicist at the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics at the University of California, Santa Barbara


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