Media Matters

WILL - Media Matters - November 27, 2011

News for All the People: The Epic Story of Race and the American Media

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(Duration: 1:00:01)

Bob's guests are Juan Gonzalez and Joseph Torres, authors of News for All the People: The Epic Story of Race and the American Media, a sweeping account of the class and racial conflicts in American news media, from the first colonial newspaper to the internet age. It chronicles key government decisions that created our nation's system of news, major political battles over the role of the press, and the rise of media conglomerates and epoch-defining technologies. The book reveals how racial segregation in the media distorted the news and unearths numerous examples of how publishers and broadcasters actually fomented racial violence through their coverage. And it illuminates how Black, Latino, Asian, and Native American journalists fought to create a vibrant yet little-known alternative and democratic press and then, beginning in the 1970s, forced open the doors of the major media companies.

The writing is fast-paced, story-driven and replete with portraits of individual journalists and media executives, both famous and obscure, the heroes and the villains. It weaves back and forth between the corporate battles and government policies that built our segregated media system- as when Commerce Secretary Herbert Hoover gave a radio license to a notorious KKK organization in the nation's capital-and those who rebelled against that system, such as Pittsburgh Courier publisher Robert L. Vann, who led a national campaign to get the black-face comedy Amos 'n' Andy off the air.


WILL - Media Matters - November 20, 2011

Harvard Law Professor Lawrence Lessig

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(Duration: 1:00:01)

Join Bob and Professor Lawrence Lessig on Sunday at 1pm for a live show. Call and comment. Lawrence Lessig is the Director of the Edmond J. Safra Foundation Center for Ethics at Harvard University, and a Professor of Law at Harvard Law School. Prior to returning to Harvard, Lessig was a Professor of Law at Stanford Law School (where he was founder of Stanford's Center for Internet and Society), Harvard Law School (1997-2000), and the University of Chicago Law School. Lessig clerked for Judge Richard Posner on the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals and Justice Antonin Scalia on the United States Supreme Court. For much of his academic career, Lessig has focused on law and technology, especially as it affects copyright. He is the author of five books on the subject - Remix (2008), Code v2 (2007), Free Culture (2004), The Future of Ideas (2001) and Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace (1999) - and has served as lead counsel in a number of important cases marking the boundaries of copyright law in a digital age, including Eldred v. Ashcroft, a challenge to the 1998 Sonny Bono Copyright Term Extension Act, and Golan v. Holder. His current academic work addresses the question of "institutional corruption" - roughly, influences within an economy of influence that weaken the effectiveness of an institution, or weaken public trust. His current work at the EJ Safra Lab oversees a 5 year research project addressing institutional corruption in a number of institutional contexts.

www.lessig.org


WILL - Media Matters - November 13, 2011

Glenn Greenwald, former Constitutional and Civil Rights Litigator joins McChesney on Sunday

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(Duration: 1:00:01)

Glenn Greenwald is a former Constitutional and civil rights litigator and is the author of two New York Times bestselling books on the Bush administration. His recent book, With Liberty and Justice for Some, is a look at what he calls America's two-tiered system of justice, where political and financial elites are rarely punished for financial crimes, yet ordinary Americans are subject to the world's largest and most merciless penal state. Greenwald was named by The Atlantic as one of the 25 most influential political commentators in the nation. He is the recipient of the first annual I.F. Stone Award for Independent Journalism, and is the winner of the 2010 Online Journalism Association Award for his investigative work on the arrest and detention of Bradley Manning.


WILL - Media Matters - November 06, 2011

Leo W. Gerard, Allied Industrial and Service Workers International Union, AFL-CIO, CLC

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(Duration: 1:00:01)

The son of a union miner and activist, Gerard went to work at a nickel smelter in his hometown of Sudbury, Ontario, at age 18. As a young man, he studied economics and political science at Laurentian University, where he later received an honorary doctorate of laws degree. Gerard was awarded a second honorary doctorate of laws degree, this one from the University of Guelph in Canada, in recognition of his contributions to social justice. Gerard was appointed International President on Feb. 28, 2001 by the USW's International Executive Board to succeed the late George Becker, who had retired. That November, Gerard was elected by acclamation in union-wide elections. Previously, Gerard was the union's International Secretary-Treasurer (1994-2001), the National Director for Canada (1991-1994) and Director of District 6 in Ontario (1986-1991). In 2005, Gerard led a ticket of International Officers and District Directors who, for the first time in the union's history, were elected without opposition. He was again re-elected by acclamation in 2009 and was installed in his current term on March 1, 2010. Call and Comment during this Live Program www.usw.org