News for All the People: The Epic Story of Race and the American Media

November 27, 2011

Bob's guests are Juan Gonzalez and Joseph Torres, authors of News for All the People: The Epic Story of Race and the American Media, a sweeping account of the class and racial conflicts in American news media, from the first colonial newspaper to the internet age. It chronicles key government decisions that created our nation's system of news, major political battles over the role of the press, and the rise of media conglomerates and epoch-defining technologies. The book reveals how racial segregation in the media distorted the news and unearths numerous examples of how publishers and broadcasters actually fomented racial violence through their coverage. And it illuminates how Black, Latino, Asian, and Native American journalists fought to create a vibrant yet little-known alternative and democratic press and then, beginning in the 1970s, forced open the doors of the major media companies.

The writing is fast-paced, story-driven and replete with portraits of individual journalists and media executives, both famous and obscure, the heroes and the villains. It weaves back and forth between the corporate battles and government policies that built our segregated media system- as when Commerce Secretary Herbert Hoover gave a radio license to a notorious KKK organization in the nation's capital-and those who rebelled against that system, such as Pittsburgh Courier publisher Robert L. Vann, who led a national campaign to get the black-face comedy Amos 'n' Andy off the air.

2004 election, adbusters, air america, alexander cockburn, al franken, amy goodman, anti-war movement, antiracismnet, a people's history of the united states, arianna huffington, art mcgee, association of public television stations, banksterusa, barbara ehrenreich, bernie sanders, bob mcchesney, books, carrie mclaren, censorship, code pink, communication studies, consumerism, counterspin, culture jamming, daly kos, danny schechter, dave zirin, douglas rushkoff, elections, fairness and accuracy in reporting, film criticism, free trade, gary ruskin, george w. bush, gore vidal, higher education,, howard zinn, huffington post, institute for public accuracy, internet, janeane garofalo, jeff cohen, jennifer pozner, jim hightower, john mccain, john nichols, juliet schor, kalle lasn, labor unions, lawrence lessig, leon dash, linda foley, matthew rothschild, media, media and commercialism, media and journalism, media beat,, media criticism, media matters, naomi klein, net neutrality, newspapers, new york times, nickeled and dimed, noam chomsky, norman solomon, occupy movement, oprah winfrey, paul krugman, phil donahue, politics, princeton university, public citizen, race, race and media, reading, robert greenwald, roger ebert, roger ebert's overlooked film festival, senate, sherrod brown, sports, sut jhally, tariq ali, telecommunications industry, the nation magazine, the new york times, the president, the progressive, thomas frank, tim robbins, vermont, wal-mart, wendell potter, william patterson, women in media & news, world bank,,