Illinois Public Media News

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - May 20, 2011

Quinn Rules Out Casino in Danville

(With additional reporting from The Associated Press)

Illinois Governor Pat Quinn says he is willing to talk about adding a casino in Chicago, but he stated on Friday that he is opposed to a larger expansion of gambling.

"If it's done the right way, it's worth looking at," Quinn said, referring to the possibility of starting a casino in Chicago. "It's very important where the money goes that is derived from this."

Quinn wants help to fund areas of the budget like education. A Chicago casino would be much larger than any currently in operation in Illinois. Gaming supporters have also pushed for slot machines at horse tracks.

New Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel supports a casino in the city to help generate revenue. Many Chicagoans now make the short drive over the Indiana border to gamble at casinos there.

When asked what he thinks about the prospect of Danville getting a casino, Quinn said Danville Mayor Scott Eisenhauer should not "hold his breath." Quinn said he doesn't want the state to be the "Las Vegas of the Midwest."

Eisenhauer said a casino would be a huge boost to Danville's economy, bringing in millions of dollars in additional tax revenue and resulting in up to 1,200 permanent jobs. He said if a casino works in Chicago, there is no reason other communities shouldn't get one.

"I think we can certainly make the case that there are other communities in the state of Illinois who could also benefit from such a license," Eisenhauer said. "Danville being the poster child of that."

House Republican Chad Hays of Catlin echoed Eisenhauer's sentiment, saying downstate border communities are just as worthy of a gaming license.

"I find that kind of statement by the Governor to be very unfortunate," Hays said. "I certainly would hold out hope that if there's going to be an expansion, people south of I-80 would not be left out. I don't think the people south of I-80 would be appreciative, and I certainly don't think they would forget."

Danville's immediate dreams for a casino were dashed earlier this year when a gaming expansion bill failed to make it out of the Illinois House. That effort included five communities poised to get a casino, which Quinn called top heavy.

"We're not going to do that," he said. "I will never support that. It's way too much. I told all the legislators, Democrat and Republican, House and Senate, that having the doors wide open and anything goes, that's just not the way to go."

Skokie Democrat Lou Lang said he plans to introduce a gaming expansion measure next week in the Illinois House of Representatives that includes Danville.

Categories: Business, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - May 20, 2011

Governor Unveils Illinois Innovation Network

Illinois Governor Pat Quinn says Illinois could be a leader in creating start-up companies.

On Friday, Quinn announced the "Illinois Innovation Network" in an invite-only event for leaders of high-tech firms.

The network is designed to help entrepreneurs get their businesses off the ground. The idea is to connect them to free or discounted advice in areas like legal matters, real estate and business development.

"The best way to fight poverty, the best way to fight crime, the best way to keep families together is a J.O.B. - a job," Quinn said. "We want to work together as a team as a family to make things happen in Illinois."

Brad Keywell, founder of Chicago-based Groupon, is chairing the network. Keywell said that in the past 25 years, the single largest creator of new jobs in the Midwest has been businesses 5 years old or less.

The website for the Illinois Innovation Network is expected to be launched Friday afternoon.

During the same event, Quinn also announced that Illinois will be the first state to partner with Startup America - a national effort to promote innovation and entrepreneurship.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - May 20, 2011

Latino Youths Organize for Control of Chicago’s Radio Arte

Some young radio producers are organizing for control of the Chicago area's only noncommercial Latino broadcast outlet.

They're upset about plans by the National Museum of Mexican Art to sell the building and license of WRTE-FM Chicago (90.5), a youth-run station known as Radio Arte that airs music and public affairs content in English and Spanish.

Transmitting at 73 watts from Little Village, Radio Arte reaches several other Latino neighborhoods of the city's Southwest Side and some nearby suburbs.

The station also trains hundreds of volunteers a year and puts dozens on the air each week. Some have formed a group to try to keep the station in their community's hands.

Many of these volunteers share a bond: They don't have papers to be living in the United States.

"Radio Arte helped me learn to fight back," said volunteer Adriana Velázquez, 20, who arrived in the Back of the Yards neighborhood from Mexico at age 11.

Velázquez graduated from Benito Juárez Community Academy in nearby Pilsen and dreamed of going to college. But her immigration status disqualified her from most financing.

"So I felt like all I had done all these years in high school - being a good student, a good member of the community - was not worth [anything] to people," she said Thursday.

Velázquez said her life changed in 2008, when she started working on a Radio Arte show, Salud: Healing Through the Arts. "That summer was when I started really talking about my status and sharing that with other students who were also going through my situation," she said.

"It was kind of a relief to feel [at] home somewhere, not feeling ashamed that I was undocumented," said Velázquez, now a music-performance student at Northeastern Illinois University.

Velázquez and the other volunteers want control of Radio Arte's name, license and transmitter. But they haven't won over museum officials.

President Carlos Tortolero said the volunteers were making too much of the museum's plans. "Radio, to a lot of funders, is old school," he said. "And we can still do radio classes without a radio station. A lot of people are streaming now online and podcasting."

Tortolero said selling the building and radio license would free up resources for projects in other media such as video and computer graphics.

The Radio Arte volunteers counter that terrestrial radio signals still reach much bigger audiences than web streaming and podcasting do. "That's especially true in immigrant and low-income communities," Velázquez said.

The license's value is not clear. Radio Arte staffers say the museum paid $12,000 for it in 1996.

Tortolero said the museum hasn't received any offers yet but adds he's talking with potential buyers, including DePaul University and California-based Radio Bilingüe. He's also met twice with Torey Malatia, chief of Chicago Public Media, the parent of WBEZ.

Interviewed Wednesday, Malatia said his organization would not have cash for the license at this point. But Chicago Public Media is preparing a proposal to "help with operations and costs," he said.

"We deeply respect Radio Arte's mission," Malatia said. "If we get involved, we would keep the tradition alive."

Malatia said Chicago Public Media would connect Radio Arte to WBEW-FM (89.5), a youth-oriented station known as Vocalo that transmits from Chesterton, Indiana. Vocalo Managing Director Silvia Rivera worked at Radio Arte for more than a decade, including three years as general manager.

If the Chicago Public Media proposal were accepted, Radio Arte likely would continue broadcasting student- and volunteer-run shows, while "primetime blocks would be simulcast" with Vocalo, according to Malatia.

"As this story gets out," Malatia added, "it puts pressure on DePaul and [Radio Bilingüe] to close the deal, and probably will pull some religious buyers into the mix."

The building, 1401 W. 18th St., houses Radio Arte's offices and studios as well as Yollocalli Arts Reach, another youth program of the museum. The wedge-shaped structure has two stories and a partly finished basement. Tortolero said the space totals about 11,000 square feet.

The museum had a real-estate appraiser look it over this month but Tortolero said his team has not set the asking price yet.

The building stands on the corner of Blue Island Avenue and 18th Street. The intersection, which includes a Mexican-themed plaza, is an anchor of Pilsen, a neighborhood whose Latino population has been shrinking.

The volunteers say they won't try to buy the building.

(Photo by Chip Mitchell/IPR)

Categories: Business, Education

AP - Illinois Public Media News - May 18, 2011

Museum to Sell Radio Arte License, Building

The license of Chicago's only noncommercial Latino radio station is for sale.

The board of the National Museum of Mexican Art has decided to unload the broadcasting license of youth-run WRTE, 90.5 FM, better known as Radio Arte, according to museum President Carlos Tortolero. Tortolero said the museum also plans to sell an 11,000 square foot building in the city's Pilsen neighborhood that houses the station and another museum youth program, Yollocalli Arts Reach.

"The funding, especially in radio, is going south," Tortolero said. "We have a building that's costing us money. We tried to borrow some money to do some things and [banks] are saying, 'No, no. You can't.' The banks are looking at us and saying, 'Hey, you have to get rid of some of this stuff.'"

Tortolero is meeting with potential buyers of the license. Those include Chicago Public Media, the parent of WBEZ. The museum has also brought a real-estate appraiser through the building. Tortolero said the museum, which launched both youth programs in 1997, plans to continue them.

But his moves have sparked opposition from some current and former Radio Arte volunteers. They say they're forming a cooperative to try to buy the station.

"We want to keep the frequency, name, license and transmitter," said Martín Macías Jr., 22, who produces a weekly news show for the station.

Categories: Business, Community

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - May 18, 2011

Construction Begins on Carle Heart and Vascular Institute

Carle Foundation Hospital has begun construction on a building that will focus primarily on heart and vascular care.

The nine-story Carle Heart and Vascular Institute, located on the hospital's campus, will include eight catheterization labs and upgrades to technology. The facility will also house intensive care beds that are currently located in buildings constructed in the 1960s and 1970s.

"We have a real need here to improve our facilities," Carle CEO James Leonard said. "We have fantastic technical capabilities. We have great people, but we're really out of space. The demand continues to increase for all cardiovascular care, both around heart attacks as well as strokes."

During a dedication ceremony Wednesday, the Institute's medical director, Matt Gibb, emphasized the center's role in treating health conditions that can worsen over time, such as a stroke, diabetes, or a heart attack.

"The tower will be a true environment for healing," Gibb said. "It will be a place where we can help patients prevent and beat heart disease, and also return to normal life following an event like a heart attack."

Hospital officials estimate the center will have a $100 million impact on the local economy, and create up to 150 jobs during the two years it takes to construct the building.

The $220 million project, which was approved by the state in 2010, will be financed with cash and the sale of bonds.

It is scheduled to be completed in 2013.

(Design courtesy of Carle Foundation Hospital)

Categories: Business, Health, Technology

AP - Illinois Public Media News - May 16, 2011

Panera’s “Pay-What-You-Want” Concept “Huge Success

The St. Louis restaurant company Panera says its experiment to open several "pay-what-you-want nonprofit restaurants" has been a huge success.

Customers at these special facilities order like normal, but the cashiers simply suggest payment amounts - what customers actually put into the donation box is up to them.

Panera founder and chairman Ronald Shaich says nearly 80 percent of customers pay the full prices or more.

"The singular thing we've learned is that humanity is fundamentally good," Shaich said. "People have essentially been doing the right thing. People get it, people respond to it, they don't abuse it. I think at first some people thought that they would abuse us."

All proceeds go toward a non-profit foundation as well as a job training program for youth.

Panera's first pay-what-you-want location was in opened in Clayton. The company has since opened two other facilities in Detroit and Portland, Oregon.

(Photo courtesy of TerryJohnston/Flickr)

Categories: Business
Tags: business

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - May 13, 2011

Company to Reopen Plant in Mattoon

A company that closed a plant in Coles County two years ago is coming back.

Houston-based NCI Building Systems, Inc. operated a plant in Mattoon for about 20 years until it was forced to close in 2009 because of downturns in the economy.

The company manufactures insulated wall systems for large commercial and industrial developments.

Angela Griffin, the president of Coles Together, said the closure left a dent in the community by eliminating about 45-to-50 jobs. She said many of those workers have been able to find new jobs within the last couple of years.

"There may still be some that are on unemployment, and hopefully they can reach back to those people and get them," Griffin said.

She said the company's return is about a $20 million investment in the community, which she estimates will initially lead to about 25 new jobs.

Mattoon beat out four other sites outside of Illinois to host the plant.

"We thought we had lost them for good," she said. "Their industry had taken a big hit, and they had vacant buildings in other states. We thought it was a slim chance that they would bring production back to Central Illinois. So, we were very pleased.

Categories: Business, Economics, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - May 12, 2011

Audit: Some State Employees Overpaid by $25K, More

Four Illinois state employees whose work was split among agencies were overpaid by $77,000 the last two years, an audit released Thursday shows.

One employee working for the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation got $36,151 more than specified. Another received and additional $25,662.

Auditor General William Holland's office examined seven cases where department employees did work for other agencies. In four of them, the employees wound up being paid too much. The audit did not indicate how many such" interagency agreements" the agency had.

In three cases, the other agency involved was the governor's budget office.

The case of the $36,000 overpayment happened under former Gov. Rod Blagojevich, said Susan Hofer, spokeswoman for the Department of Financial and Professional Regulation. She couldn't immediately say whether money had been recovered.

The other overpayments occurred when payroll for the agency was being centralized and confusion over the new system might have played a role, she said.

Holland's report also found in several cases that the agency lacked documentation showing an employee did any work for the Department of Financial and Professional Regulation and other cases where there was no explanation of how payment among the participating agencies was determined.

In its response to the audit, the department said it will be more diligent in recognizing possible overpayments and adjusting pay in such cases. Officials said they would try to develop a way to determine how much each agency should pay.

The report also declared that the Department of Financial and Professional Regulation couldn't find $240,000 worth of equipment - mostly computers - the last two years.

The agency told Holland it didn't know whether the computers contained any confidential information.

Hofer said some computers were stolen during a break-in at an agency office, but she couldn't immediately say why that wasn't mentioned in the audit.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - May 11, 2011

McKinley YMCA Sold, to Revert Back to Mansion

An old mansion in Champaign that was converted into the McKinley YMCA could soon become a mansion once again.

Local developer Leon Jeske has purchased the McKinley Y from the Champaign County YMCA for $450,000. He plans to restore the century-old building, and lease it out as a private residence. Jeske stepped in after earlier plans to sell the square-block site to Owens Funeral Home fell through.

Jeske said the building is in essentially good shape. He said much of its interior features are unchanged, despite decades of use by the YMCA.

"They put in some ceiling tiles --- like acoustical tiling, one foot square," Jeske said. "That's not original. But the woodwork is all intact, even where they added a partition or wall, they did not disturb the crown moldings, they just kind of went over them, cut around them. So everything's there."

Jeske said he hasn't yet decided what to do with the adjoining carriage house, or the additions built for the building's YMCA use, including an indoor swimming pool. But he said the additions have separate entrances and could be converted into apartments, and he said the site also has commercial potential.

"It's right across the street from Westside Park," Jeske explained. "I could see a small cafeteria-type restaurant that could serve coffee and cake, and maybe a glass of wine, with a lot of outdoor seating where you could overlook the park."

Jeske said a restaurant would require a zoning change, but he said the site is appropriate for that sort of use.

The facility will continue as the McKinley YMCA until the Champaign County Y's new facility in southwest Champaign is ready to open next year. CEO Mark Johnson said construction of the new facility is moving ahead on schedule, and until it's completed, they're leasing the McKinley "Y" back from Jeske on a month-to-month basis.

Categories: Architecture, Business

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - May 09, 2011

State Farm to Close Champaign Office

State Farm Insurance says it will close two-dozen field offices over the next year in three states, including one in Champaign on West Park Court that employs 20 people.

It is part of an effort to save the company $8 million over the next five years. State Farm did a year-long study leading up to the consolidation plan, and found it could save money by centralizing technology while remaining efficient.

State Farm spokeswoman Missy Lundberg said administrative staff will consolidate to Indianapolis, but she said most employees will not be affected.

"A lot of those 13 hundred employees are what we call mobile claim workers, and they will be staying in those communities," she said. "What that means is that they will maybe work out of their home, maybe work out of a car, maybe work out of an agent's office."

The Bloomington-based company says it hopes to retain all the affected employees.

In addition to the State Farm office in Champaign closing, Illinois branches affected by the consolidation are in Marion, Collinsville, Springfield, Peoria, Moline, Rockford, Elmhurst, Tinley Park, and Arlington Heights.

Offices in Michigan and Indiana will also close.


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