Illinois Public Media News

AP - Illinois Public Media News - May 18, 2010

New Signs Proclaim Urbana Bike Friendly Community

Signs will soon go up along streets leading into Urbana that tell people their bicycles are welcome.

The purple signs recognize Urbana's new designation as a bike-friendly community by the League of American Bicyclists.

Public Works Director Bill Grey says the signs send an important message.

"It does send a message that this is a town that is accommodating bicycling as a mode of transportation", says Grey. And we're implementing the facilities to do so, and the education and enforcement that go along with that. And encouragement of people to want to get out of their cars , or seek this as a viable mode of transportation."

City councilman and avid cyclist Charlie Smyth says the designation is important for Urbana because of the estimated 8 percent of city residents who use bikes to get to work. Smyth says that's according to the Champaign County Regional Planning Commission. And he says it's important for the city to upgrade its designation from bronze to silver-level. Smyth says that will require more and better bicycle education programs in Urbana --- and better connections between bike paths.

Champaign has not been named a Bicycle Friendly Community --- but the League of American Bicyclists did name Champaign city government a Bicycle Friendly Business.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - May 05, 2010

Mable Thomas Street” Gets Initial Champaign Council Okay

Longtime Champaign neighborhood services employee Mable Thomas, who passed away last month, will likely receive a street named in her honor.

With unanimous preliminary approval from the Champaign City Council, University Avenue from Elm Street to State Street would be designated as Mable Thomas Street. It was chosen because it borders West Side Park, where Thomas was known for organizing the local National Night Out against Crime.

City Councilman Tom Bruno enthusiastically supports this gesture to honor Thomas, based on what he saw of her work in the Neighborhood Services Department. "She would be able to maintain a level of order and courtesy so that people's emotions could cool down a little and they could talk rationally about a grievance they had or a problem," Bruno said. "In that way, she was just really good at what she did. Her passing is a great loss for the city of Champaign."

Thomas' accomplishments included helping to expand the city's Neighborhood Watch Program and creating the Neighborhood Small Grant Program. She helped to organize hundreds of neighborhood groups and was active in many community organizations and activities, including CommUnity Matters and First Street Farmer's Market.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - May 04, 2010

CU Bike to Work Day Aiming to Take Some Cars off the Streets

The bicycling community in Champaign-Urbana hopes to start commuters on a new habit Tuesday morning.

"CU Bike to Work Day" has attracted about 500 people who have signed up to receive a t-shirt and pledge to ride their bike instead of drive. Rick Langlois of the group Champaign County Bikes says the group is now out of shirts, but it still expects lots of unregistered riders to take part too.

He says the goal of the event is to encourage more bicyclists to overcome their worries and take to the streets. Langlois says some are concerned about safety, which is why his group advocates bike lanes for a little more peace of mind.

"Bike lanes are very much an effort to assist those less comfortable or average adult riders feel more comfortable," said Langlois. "A bike lane is not a magic force field and it doesn't keep somerone from being struck by a vehicle, but it does designate a space where a bicyclist is expected to be."

But Langlois also reminds drivers that bicyclists also have the right to use a traffic lane in areas without bike lanes.

He says the bike group is also collecting information on bicycle use for planners in Champaign and Urbana as they consider infrastructure in the years ahead.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 28, 2010

Illinois Marathon’s Street Closures Will Impact Farmer’s Market

Saturday's Illinois Marathon in Champaign-Urbana could alter the schedule for some shoppers at this season's first Market at the Square.

The Market will start its 31st season this weekend at Illinois and Vine Streets in Urbana. Vine is also one of those streets that will see more than 10,000 runners pass through from the west, as the marathon and half-marathon races get underway at 7:30. Starting their route at the U of I by going up 1st Street, runners will be entering Urbana on Green Street, north on Race, and east on Main Street. Lieutenant Kent Jepsen is the special events coordinator with Urbana Police. He expects the intersection of Main and Vine Streets to re-open around 9, but says there will be some gaps. "Prior to that, of course the runners will have lightened up," said Jepsen. "You'll be at the back of the pack of the 9-to-10,000 runners, so there will be pusling across Main and Vine as runners allow. In other words, when there's light runners and gaps in between them, the officer and volunteers will allow traffic to pulse through southbound." Market at the Square shoppers who live just south of that intersection won't be impacted. The runners will continue east on Main Street and south down Cottage Grove.

A total of 14,200 runners are now registered for the 2nd annual Illinois Marathon. Full details are available on line at the Illinois Marathon website. Event Co-director Mike Lindemann says motorists in Champaign won't see the same impact, with some streets limited to one lane. "I don't want to say there won't be delays in Champaign, there will be." said Lindemann. "But if people are patient, or if they look at that web site, there's a beltway map to get around the course. And to get around it, obviously you have to drive a few miles out of the way, but it might be better than waiting 15 or 20 minutes at a corner to get across the street." Lindeman says the event has now recruited the volunteers necessary for Saturday's events. Six countries and 46 states are represented in the marathon, half-marathon, and 5K race.

Categories: Community, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 26, 2010

New Kind of Senior Housing To Be Built In Rural Champaign County

The village of St. Joseph looks to become the first U-S community to build a different kind of home for the elderly.

Abbeyfield House is a non-profit facility that began in England in the 1950's, and now has more than 700 locations in 16 countries. The goal of the Abbeyfield Society is keeping relatively healthy seniors near their current home, but adds the benefits of living with others.

A groundbreaking ceremony was held Sunday in St. Joseph, where organizers expect to move about 12 residents by the end of the year. Mary Butzow is the President of Abbeyfield Society USA. She began researching the overseas homes when seeking out a new place for her mother to live. "And too many seniors, particularly if they lost their house or their life partner, are isolated in their house,' said Butzow. "Their kids may not live around here. People drop in and out, but there are hours and hours at a time when they're alone. This way, they have 11 other people their same age who are going to be living within 10 feet of them. Research has shown that seniors stay healthier longer when they have good, nutritious meals and somebody to visit with."

The village of St. Joseph approved construction of Abbeyfield House last year. The home is being paid for by those who have bought apartments in the 13,000 square foot home, and will take most of it with them when leaving the home. Seven seniors already have memberships, ranging in age from 60 to 90. Butzow says Abbeyfield House differs from a nursing home, having no medical staff on hand, with only an on-site manager to prepare 2 meals a day . She says cities in Minnesota and Indiana have shown an interest in starting up their own house, but adds a few Central Illinois towns hope to generate enough interest for an Abbeyfield House of their own.

Categories: Community

AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 22, 2010

Gov. Quinn Helps Roger Ebert Kick Off Annual Film Festival

Roger Ebert's Film Festival kicked off its 12th annual edition in downtown Champaign Wednesday night, with a showing of "Pink Floyd The Wall", and an appearance by Governor Pat Quinn.

Quinn introduced Ebert, who came to the Virginia Theater stage as the near capacity audience rose to their feet to welcome him. The 67-year-old Ebert is a native son of Champaign-Urbana. He attended Urbana High School and the University of Illinois, before launching his career as a film critic at the Chicago Sun-Times and on a long-running TV show.

The governor presented Ebert with a proclamation naming the festival's s opening day as "Ebertfest Day" in Illinois. Reading from the document, Governor Quinn said that Ebert "has guided, informed and challenged Illinois moviegoers, championing films of every genre that lesser critics have ignored or demeaned".

The proclamation also praises Ebert for showing "extraordinary grace and unflagging courage in the face of serious illness, continuing to write with passion, strength and confidence about film, about life, and about the essential connections between the two."

Speaking through a laptop-mounted voice synthesizer, Ebert thanked the governor. "You took office at a difficult time, and brought honor back to the state's highest office", Ebert said through the device. "This is a most meaningful award, and with permission, I would like to share it with everyone involved in Ebertfest."

Ebert uses his annual film festival to highlight movies he feels deserve first-time or renewed attention. His choices range from Hollywood blockbusters, to little-known independent and foreign films, everything from silent movies to musicals.

Roger Ebert's Film Festival continues through Sunday in Champaign-Urbana, with movies shown at the Virginia Theater, and panels on film at the U of I Illini Union. Thursday night's s schedule includes a showing of the extended version of Francis Ford Coppola's "Apocalypse Now", with the film's sound designer Water Murch as a guest.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 15, 2010

New Art Film Festival Showcases Local and Midwest Filmmaking

The New Art Film Festival is underway in downtown Champaign's Art Theater. The festival --- which opened Thursday night --- showcases films by local and Midwest independent filmmakers.

Sanford Hess, the Art Theater operator, says the timing for it now was perfect, with the Boneyard Arts Festival also going on in Champaign-Urbana this weekend.

"We're looking at some of the materials that I'd been sent from Boneyard in February, and I just realized it was a great match", says Hess. I mean, here's local artists; they're doing work in a different media - film - but they're local artists."

Hess says the New Art Film Festival also will be a nice lead-in to Ebertfest next week.

The Film Festival will feature more than 20 films of many genres - from comedy to drama to documentaries..

Friday night's movies include the videogame parody "Press Start" produced by Champaign-based Dark Maze Studios. Also on the bill is Robin Christian's film "Act Your Age", featuring the late Pat Morita.

 

Categories: Community, Entertainment

AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 15, 2010

Champaign Park Board Delays Decision on Virginia Theatre Marquee

Faced with opposition to its plans to take down the neon marquee at the Virginia Theatre, the Champaign Park Board has decided the issue needs more study.

The V-shaped neon marquee has announced shows at the Virginia for 60 years or more. But Champaign park officials say restoration plans have always called for installing a less flashy marquee resembling what was on the Virginia when it opened in 1921. Susanne Skaggs, speaking during the public comment portion of Wednesday night's Champaign Park Board meeting, says the neon marquee distracts from the Virginia's Italian Renaissance façade.

"The marquee, as far as I'm concerned, is nothing but signage" says Skaggs. "And signage, certainly, can be easily changed."

But eight other people told park commissioners the neon marquee is an important part of the Virginia's history. Adam Smith is vice-chairman of the Champaign Historic Preservation Commission, which has formally requested that the neon marquee be preserved. Smith says the marquee has become a local landmark in itself.

"If the neon is lit, you know something is happening that night", says Smith, "you pull over on Park Street, you park and you find out what it is."

Champaign Park Commissioners voted Wednesday night to delay a decision on the Virginia marquee until they can get more information --- including how much it would cost to restore the current neon marquee, which is badly run down.

But the Park Board did approve nearly $600,000 in restoration work to be done this summer on the Virginia lobby, funded by private donations. Park Commissioners hope to do work on the marquee at the same time.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 14, 2010

The Census Takes a New Turn, with Workers Going Door-to-Door

A planner in Champaign County says response to the 2010 census is slightly better than at this point during the last census two years ago.

But Andrew Levy says census workers will still have to go door-to-door to find and count the 30 percent of people in the county who won't have turned in their forms by the end of this week. Levy says enumerators are already at work in some parts of the county that are usually tougher to count.

"They're focusing in rural areas and they have been out there for quite awhile," Levy said. "In Champaign-Urbana, census workers are concentrated around the U of I campus to make sure that they count the students before they leave for the summer. But they'll be all over Champaign-Urbana in the next few weeks."

Levy says if an enumerator comes to your door, they'll only ask the 10 short questions found on the census form - there's no long census form this year. Census workers are also required to show official identification and will not ask for anyone's social security or credit card number.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 13, 2010

Champaign Neighborhood Liaison Mable Thomas Dies

The head of the city of Champaign's Neighborhood Services department says a familiar face to neighborhood groups in the city will be missed.

Mable Thomas has been the neighborhood coordinator since the city formed its neighborhood services program in 1992. Thomas died early Tuesday morning in St. Louis after an illness of several months.

Kevin Jackson says Thomas was the main liaison between Champaign's many neighborhood groups and city government, and she was the right person for the job.

"She not only had to have the ability to remain calm and posed in potentially volatile situations, but dealing with a variety of stakeholder interests she had to be a strong-willed person and a very objective person to make sure that the right thing happened," Jackson said.

Champaign mayor Jerry Schweighart says Thomas's loss is a loss to city government and the community. Thomas created a small grant program for neighborhood projects and oversaw Champaign's role in the anti-crime program known as National Night Out.


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