Illinois Public Media News

AP - Illinois Public Media News - January 13, 2010

Champaign City Council Endorses Updated Police Use of Force Policy

Changes made in the wake of the Kiwane Carrington shooting are now part of the Champaign Police Department's Use of Force policy and procedure. The Champaign City Council endorsed the revisions last (Tuesday) night.

The updated policy now spells out the combination of circumstances that must be in place before an officer may use deadly force on a citizen --- involving cases where a person has harmed, or is threatening to harm the officer or another person, or is threatening to use a deadly weapon to escape.

The police department's Taser policy is also clarified. New language makes it clear that Champaign Police do not use Tasers, but may call in other agencies with Tasers when they feel they are needed. Police Chief R-T Finney says even then, Taser use is limited, according to the situation.

"We had a situation where we needed to use a Taser", says Finney. "(The) agency came; the situation changed in terms of the person who was barricaded was utilizing some volatile chemicals in the house. And we opted not to use the Taser at that point. So, you know, we still have that control."

The changes to police policy come after 15 year old Kiwane Carrington was shot to death during a struggle with a Champaign officer last October. The shooting led to renewed charges that Champaign Police do not treat African-Americans fairly --- and pledges from the city council to improve police/community relations.

The changes were not enough for eight people who addressed the city council last night. They included Terry Townsend, who said the changes were only incremental, and failed to address deeper problems with relations between police and the African-American community.

"It is imperative that we do something to take the confrontational nature out of police community relations" Townsend told the city council. "And having these policies that you just can't make major changes because of constitutional or state law ... that you tweak ... that's not going to make the issue go away."

Some council members said they thought more needed to be done as well. District One Councilman Will Kyles says he saw frustration among both police and community members who did not believe that change was possible.

"That's the root of the problem", said Kyles. "That's what I want to work on --- not just having a discussion, but really helping, not only the community but the officers believe that things are going to change. Because right now, I don't think in my heart that people thing that."

Kyles called for more positive engagement between the Champaign Police Department and the community - including with some of the department's harshest critics.

City Manager Steve Carter said the revisions to the Use Of Force Policy may not address all problems, but were a step forward. Police Chief Finney says he doesn't think the policy needs any further tweaking. He says there are other police policies to address other concerns.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - January 12, 2010

Second Suspect in Grisly 2006 Champaign Murders Sentenced to Life

Two life sentences await one of the three suspects in a grisly double murder in Champaign three years ago.

A Champaign County judge yesterday sentenced 32 year old Crystal Myrick, who along with her ex boyfriend Sean Kelly beat and stabbed Jeremiah and Sue Haigh in the Haigh family's home in the summer of 2006. Kelly pleaded guilty to Jeremiah Haigh's death last year and is serving a 50 year sentence. Myrick's uncle Russell Pitcher is also charged in the case and is awaiting trial. Testimony showed the couple were killed in the course of a robbery.

Categories: Criminal Justice
Tags: crime

AP - Illinois Public Media News - January 11, 2010

Internal CPD Investigation into Carrington Death Gets Underway

As Champaign City Council members consider changes to the police department's use-of-force policy, an internal review is getting underway into last fall's police shooting death.

15 year old Kiwane Carrington was shot and killed as he and Officer Daniel Norbits were scuffling during a report of a break in at a Vine Street house. Police chief RT Finney had also responded and was slightly injured controlling another juvenile.

Champaign city manager Steve Carter is in charge of the internal investigation - he'll be assisted by two people outside city government - retired Urbana police chief Eddie Adair and retired McLean County judge John Freese.

Adair says their investigation will review the state police report into the shooting incident but won't change the outcome of that report, which led to a state's attorney's decision not to file charges.

"This is of an internal focus, looking at the training practices of the department and its policies and procedures as it relates to those only," Adair said.

Tomorrow night the Champaign City Council looks at proposed changes to the police department's use of force policy. City officials want to clarify for officers the right times to use lethal force.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - January 08, 2010

Quinn says he didn’t ask details of early release inmates who went back to prison

Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn says he didn't know why 48 inmates released early were back in prison when he talked about them last week -- and he didn't ask.

Quinn stopped a secret early release program known as MGT Push and announced that 48 of 1,700 inmates set free early were back behind bars because they violated parole rules.

The Associated Press found that at least 17 violated parole by committing violent crimes like attempted murder and armed robbery.

Quinn said Friday he never asked Corrections officials what the violations were.

The Democrat wouldn't say whether the public should have known about the crimes. He says he stopped the plan quickly and is reforming the prison agency.

Quinn was at an unrelated event in the Chicago suburb of Matteson.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - January 06, 2010

Legislative Panel Endorses Sale of Thomson Prison to House Guantanamo Detainees

Gov. Pat Quinn and Sen. Dick Durbin are applauding the s recommendation of a panel of Illinois lawmakers to close a state prison so that it can be sold to the federal government.

In a statement, the Democrats say that selling Thomson Correctional Center to the U.S. to house Guantanamo Bay detainees shouldn't be a political or partisan issue. They say it should be about "doing what's right for our troops, for our national security and for the people of Illinois.''

The Illinois Commission on Government Forecasting and Accountability voted 7-4 Wednesday to accept a recommendation to close Thomson.

Only Republicans ... like Bloomington Sen. Bill Brady ... cast "no" votes. Brady, who's running for governor, says Quinn has botched programs to release Illinois prisoners early. He says it shows Illinois needs Thomson to house the state's own inmates. He points to an estimate that shows it may cost 350 million dollars to build a prison like Thomson today.

"But yet, our governor in all the great negotiating skills that he has, indicated he'd be thrilled if he could get 120 to 150 million dollars", said Brady. "This is something we can ill afford to give the federal government. We're not only giving them a way out on terrorists. We're giving them a facility for half of what it would cost them to build today."

Other Republicans on the Commission casting "no" votes were Rep. Patti Bellock, Sen. Mike Murphy and Rep. Raymond Poe. Two Republicans voted for the Thomson prison sale --- Rep. and Co-Chairman Rich Myers and Sen. Dave Syverson. The Commission's five Democrats all voted "yes" --- they are Sen. Mike Frerichs of Champaign, along with Rep. Al Riley, Sen. and Co-Chairman Jeff Schoenburg, Sen. Donne Trotter and Rep. Elaine Nekritz.

The vote by the bipartisan committee is nonbinding, and Quinn already has said he plans to sell the prison. The sale could be completed as early as the spring.

(Additional reporting by Illinois Public Radio)


AP - Illinois Public Media News - December 31, 2009

Brown’s Chicken Restaurants Files for Bankruptcy Protection

A chain of chicken restaurants that became noted due to the 1993 slayings of seven employees at one of its suburban Chicago stores has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection.

Brown's Chicken & Pasta filed on Tuesday ... two months after a DuPage County judge ordered the company to pay more than $800,000 to a former employee and minority shareholder. An attorney for the company says the company could not afford to pay the judgment.

Brown's has 39 stores in the Chicago area. The company once had as many as 150 stores, but the numbers have been dwindling since the slayings of the workers in Palatine.

The restaurants will remain open during the reorganization.

Categories: Business, Criminal Justice
Tags: crime, business

AP - Illinois Public Media News - December 31, 2009

Quinn Says Early Release of 1700 Inmates a Mistake

Governor Pat Quinn says a secret policy change that allowed some well-behaved criminals to leave prison after fewer than three weeks behind bars was a mistake. But he says given the state's budget woes, Illinois' prison system has been forced to economize.

The governor called the accelerated early release of inmates ... some of whom were violent offenders ... "bad judgment." And Quinn says he never gave Corrections Director Michael Randle the authority to do it.

Yet Quinn also seemed to downplay the gravity of the situation. He says each of the 1700 inmates released early on meritorious good time would have been out of prison by the end of January anyway.

"We should not in any way, I think, miss the point that there are literally thousands of people coming into our prison system for a very short period of time", said Quinn.

Quinn says that because the state corrections budget was slashed, Randle was put in the challenging position of finding savings. The governor says Randle will keep his job as director, but he has terminated the program. His opponent in the Democratic primary race for governor, Comptroller Dan Hynes, calls Quinn's acknowledgment "inadequate" and "lame.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - December 31, 2009

Danville Police Seek Two Suspects in First Savings Bank Holdup

Danville Police are investigating the armed robbery of the First Savings Bank on West Williams yesterday (Wednesday) afternoon.

Police answering an alarm at the bank were told by employees that two masked men displayed a handgun and fled the bank on foot with an undisclosed amount of money. No one was injured in the holdup.

The two suspects are described as black males in their late teens or early 20s, five-foot-nine to five-foot-ten in height with slim builds. Both wore hooded sweatshirts and dark pants with dark colored cloth over their faces.

If you have information about the robbery, call Danville Police at 431-2250 or make your contact anonymous through Vermilion County Crimestoppers at 446-TIPS.

Categories: Criminal Justice
Tags: crime

AP - Illinois Public Media News - December 28, 2009

Jackson Wants Federal Probe of Rockford Police Shooting

The Rev. Jesse Jackson is urging Rockford residents to push for a federal investigation into the police shooting of an unarmed man inside a church-run day care.

At a news conference at the day care center on Sunday, Jackson criticized a grand jury for ruling last week that the shooting was justified.

He urged residents to push for an outcome that's "just and fair.''

The Aug. 24 killing of 23-year-old Mark Anthony Barmore at the church-run facility in Rockford has heightened racial tensions in the community. The two officers are white and Barmore was black.

Witnesses say Barmore surrendered. But police have said Barmore tried to attack the officers.

Barmore's father, Anthony Stevens, says the grand jury decision made for the worst Christmas he's ever had.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - December 23, 2009

Home Where Central Illinois Family Slain to Remain Crime Scene

The Logan County home where five members of a family were found dead earlier this year will remain a crime scene until defense investigators can examine the property.

30-year-old Christopher Harris and his 22-year-old brother Jason Harris have been charged with numerous counts of first-degree murder in the deaths of Rick and Ruth Gee and three of their children in September. A fourth child at the home in Beason suffered critical injuries but survived.

The Harrises, of Armington, are jailed without bond.

In court this week, prosecutors agreed to preserve the Gee home until defense attorneys complete their work.

Illinois Assistant Attorney General Michael Atterberry says crime scene tape will remain around the property and windows will stay boarded.

Categories: Criminal Justice
Tags: crime

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