Illinois Public Media News

AP - Illinois Public Media News - June 07, 2011

Blagojevich Testimony Entering Final Stages

The judge in ousted Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich's retrial says he expects the jury to begin deliberating Thursday.

U.S. District Judge James Zagel made the comment shortly after Blagojevich ended his testimony on Tuesday.

Zagel says the defense plans to call two more witnesses Wednesday, when the government could be ready to present its closing arguments.

The judge says jurors could start to deliberate Thursday after the defense finishes their closing.

The testimony stage of the retrial has lasted six weeks.

The government presented a streamlined, three-week case and called 15 witnesses.

The defense called three witnesses over three weeks. Blagojevich was on for most of that time. Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel and U.S. Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. also took the stand for the defense.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - June 06, 2011

Blago: Emanuel Raised Issue of Congressional Seat

Rod Blagojevich says Rahm Emanuel raised the issue of having then-Gov. Blagojevich appoint a successor to Emanuel's congressional seat in 2008 when Emanuel became White House chief of staff.

Blagojevich says his staff told him the move would be unconstitutional. Normally, a special election is held for a congressional vacancy.

Blagojevich is testifying for a sixth day at his corruption retrial.

Prosecutor Reid Schar (shahr) introduced the issue of the congressional seat. He asked whether Emanuel had approached Blagojevich about making an appointment. Blagojevich agreed the purpose would be to give the appointee an advantage in a special election.

Blagojevich said he was told by his lawyers and political consultant that such an appointment would be unconstitutional.

A spokesperson for Emanuel, now Chicago's mayor, could not immediately be reached for comment.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - June 06, 2011

Federal Prosecutors Rest in Mumbai Terror Trial

The federal government has rested its case in the trial of a Chicago businessman accused in the deadly 2008 Mumbai attacks.

Prosecutors rested Monday after calling the last of eight total witnesses in the case against Tahawwur Rana. Rana has pleaded not guilty to providing a cover story for David Headley, an admitted Pakistani-American terrorist who conducted surveillance ahead of the attacks that killed more than 160.

Rana's defense attorneys now begin their case and say they'll call witnesses a including a computer expert. Rana isn't expected to testify.

Headley has pleaded guilty and was the government's star witness. He testified how he took orders from Pakistani intelligence and a militant group as he took video surveillance.

Categories: Criminal Justice
Tags: crime

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - June 03, 2011

Cars, Tenants Still Observed at Cherry Orchard

(Reported by Pam Dempsey of CU-CitizenAccess)

It's been six weeks since a Champaign County judge ordered the closure of an apartment complex between Rantoul and Thomasboro.

But public health officials say people continue to live there. Indeed, as of Thursday, there were several cars parked in front of a far east building, which had a new dumpster nearby and kids playing in the yard.

The first collection buildings in the complex, known as Cherry Orchard, looks empty from the main highway - County Road 1500 East. There appears to be no cars and no people.

In April, a Champaign County judge fined its managers, Bernard and Eduardo Ramos, more than $54,000 and ordered them to close down the property following a nearly four-year-old Champaign County Public Health Department case.

New painted words "For Sale" have replaced "Cherry Orchard" on a large, weathered wood sign. New phone numbers with the 202 area code have appeared. The property is listed for $1.3 million on this website. There is no longer a "for rent" sign.

The main entrance is blocked by an old telephone pole propping up a door turned on its side decorated by the word "Closed" in spray-paint. An electrical cord of some type serves as a make-shift rope between two trees that flank the main entrance.

By all appearances, from the corner of county roads 1500 East and 2700 North, the 11-acre, 68-unit apartment complex looks to be in compliance with the April court order.

A woman answered a call to one of the phone numbers listed on the sign, but pleasantly declined to give her name and said she would only discuss the details of the complex and its selling price with serious buyers. She said the complex was "empty, completely empty."

The Ramoses were accused of failing to legally connect sewer and septic systems for six of their eight apartment buildings on the property. The apartment complex has traditionally housed many migrant workers.

The Health Department had sought to stop the Ramoses from renting out the property until the septic system could be legally fixed.

Bernard and Eduardo Ramos have repeatedly declined to comment for any news stories about the complex - including not returning calls seeking comment and posting signs warning "media dogs" to stay away. After April's ruling, the pair flashed a sign at reporters that read "slander- lying" as they left the courtroom.

The Ramos incurred more legal troubles when they failed to show up for a status hearing in May, after reports that the complex had yet to be closed and tenants remained. They notified the state's attorney's office prior to the hearing to report that they were on an extended trip to Texas.

At the May hearing, Judge John Kennedy issued a civil contempt warrant and a criminal contempt warrant for both Bernard Ramos and his father, Eduardo. The arrest warrants each include a $10,000 bond. If arrested, the judge requires that the Ramoses post the full amount - a total of $20,000 each - rather than the typical 10 percent before they can be released.

Soon after, the complex appeared to have been closed down.

But health officials who regularly spot-check the complex have found people living there, and neighbors have reported to health officials that men are working on apartments during the day as well and that residents remain in the buildings.

A visit to the area on Thursday morning showed the same.

While the main entrance to the complex is closed, a second driveway - accessible further down County Road 2700 North - leads right to the far east building (noted as number 5 on the map below).

There appeared to be a work van and four or five cars parked in front of the complex.

There were also children playing out front.

Neighbors have also reported that new air conditioners have been installed in the windows and a new dumpster was placed nearby.

Health Department officials do not have the authority to physically remove anyone from the complex; however, they remain concerned about the safety and health of residents who continue to live there due to the conditions of the complex.

Health officials are also concerned that the Ramoses are preparing the place for additional tenants - migrant workers who typically move to the area during this time of year, said Public Health Administrator Julie Pryde.

As of Friday, Bernard and Eduardo Ramos have yet to be arrested on the outstanding warrants for contempt of court.

The County Board of Health plans to meet next week with officials from the county to see what options they can legally pursue to ensure that the apartment complex is vacated and the illegal discharge of sewage ends, Pryde said.

(Photo by A. H. Gorton of CU-CitizenAccess)

Recent Photos Taken of the Cherry Orchard Apartment Complex:


AP - Illinois Public Media News - June 02, 2011

Prosecutors Begin Blagojevich Cross-Examination

(With additional reporting from The Associated Press)

The prosecution has begun an aggressive cross-examination of Former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich at the ousted Illinois governor's corruption retrial.

Prosecutor Reid Schar asked Blagojevich if he was a convicted liar. Blagojevich answered yes.

Prosecutors likely relished the chance to grill Blagojevich. At his first trial last year - in which he was convicted of lying to the FBI - the ousted governor never took the stand and prosecutors never had a chance to cross-examine him.

During five days of questions from his own attorney, Blagojevich denied all the allegations against him, including that he tried to sell or trade President Barack Obama's vacated U.S. Senate seat.

Earlier, Blagojevich tried to carefully explain conversations he had with his advisers in late 2008 about various ways he could leverage his power to appoint a U.S. senator.

The conversations were secretly recorded by the FBI, and the jury in Blagojevich's federal corruption trial has already heard them.

At one point, Blagojevich is heard talking with members of his inner circle about his desire to be appointed Secretary of Health and Human Services by President Barack Obama.

"If [HHS] was available to me, I could [appoint Obama friend] Valerie Jarrett in a heartbeat," Blagojevich said on the call.

Asked on Thursday morning by his attorney, Aaron Goldstein, to explain that statement, Blagojevich analogized it to saying, "If I could play center field for the Cubs, I would do that in a heartbeat, too."

Blagojevich testified he understood the cabinet appointment was not going to happen. He said that's because, in part, one of his friends and closest political supporters, the SEIU's Tom Balanoff, told him it was not a possibility.

Why, then, was Blagojevich still talking about the idea on wiretapped conversations with his advisers?

"It goes to one of my insecurities," he explained. "I was embarrassed by the flat out dismissal of the idea by [Balanoff]."

The ex-governor testified that he was "trying to not look too irrelevant to my staff."

Guided by Goldstein, Blagojevich reiterated that no actual deal was offered involving the cabinet job and a Jarrett appointment. He explained that no decision had been made.

Labor Union Gig

The testimony then moved on to another alleged scheme, that Blagojevich would appoint Jarrett if Obama was able to arrange for the governor to become a national coordinator for the labor advocacy group "Change to Win."

Blagojevich testified that such a job would put him in a position to "have my cake and eat it too." He said it would allow him to make money to help his family's finances, while being involved in an issue important to him, and allow for a possible - though admittedly unlikely - political comeback.

But once again, Blagojevich told jurors he wasn't sold on the idea and didn't try to make it happen.

"I never decided to do it," Blagojevich testified. "I ultimately didn't like the idea."

Non-Profit Advocacy Leader

Instead, Blagojevich said he started to focus on another idea he found "more appealing." He wanted to land a leading role at what would be a new non-profit that would advocate for children's healthcare.

At this point in his testimony, Blagojevich tried to further an underlying theme to his defense: that he was influenced by the words and assistance of his advisers.

Regarding the non-profit idea, Blagojevich said he talked to his top government lawyer, Bill Quinlan, "constantly and continuously" about how to form such a group.

Judge James Zagel has barred Blagojevich from employing an "advice of counsel" defense to the charges he faces. But he is allowed to state that informal advice from his staff contributed to his "state of mind." Blagojevich insists he was acting "in good faith."

Getting to Rahm

On one of the wiretapped phone calls, Blagojevich is heard chatting with his former aide, Doug Scofield, about the non-profit idea. They were trying to figure out the best way to get a message to then-U.S. Rep. Rahm Emanuel, to see if he'd be willing to approach some big Obama donors to provide start-up cash for the advocacy group.

The ex-governor said he was being clear to Scofield that he didn't want there to be any commitments made to Emanuel, who at the time was the incoming White House chief of staff. They planned to ask John Wyma, an insider who was close to both Emanuel and Blagojevich, to be the emissary.

"I didn't want him to give the wrong impression that I was promising something I hadn't decided on," Blagojevich testified, referring, in part, to the U.S. Senate seat.

Blagojevich acknowledged he believed it would be "highly unlikely" for Emanuel to agree to help set up the advocacy group, but added, "Why not see if he'd be willing to help? You never know."

The ex-governor said he did not make the call personally, because he was "frankly being sensitive to Rahm."

The message apparently never got to Emanuel, who is now the mayor of Chicago. Testifying last week as a witness for the defense, Emanuel said he was never approached about a potential deal involving the Senate seat, and an advocacy group.

More Emanuel Contact

Earlier on Thursday, Blagojevich testified he talked, directly, to Emanuel three times about the Senate appointment.

The ex-governor said he raised the idea of appointing Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan to the Senate, in exchange for some sort of possible legislative deal with her father, House Speaker Mike Madigan.

Blagojevich said he believed Emanuel was "pleasantly surprised" that the governor was considering a Madigan appointment.

"[Emanuel's] a sensible guy and understood the politics as well as the good things that could be done," Blagojevich said on the stand.

Madigan "Mega Deal"

Blagojevich testified that "throughout the entire period, [Lisa Madigan] was always on my mind" as a Senate pick.

Blagojevich referred to a possible deal involving the Madigans as the "mega deal." He said he directed his deputy governor, Bob Greenlee, to prepare a document containing a legislative wish list that could be presented to Speaker Madigan.

"I love that document," Blagojevich said, noting it included an expansion of state-funded healthcare, passage of a statewide construction bill, and a written promise from Madigan that he would seek no sales or income tax increases.

"I couldn't get any of it done without Michael Madigan unless I found creative ways around him," Blagojevich testified. "But we needed him to do this."

Describing other items on the document, including climate change and poverty reduction initiatives, Blagojevich was warned by Judge James Zagel to read the list "without your campaign speech."

And he would have help making the deal, Blagojevich said. The governor said he had conversations about it with a number of U.S. Senate Democrats, including Nevada's Harry Reid, Illinois' Dick Durbin and New Jersey's Robert Menendez. He said they wanted Lisa Madigan to be appointed, and it was his hope that - should he choose to go through with the deal - "they would be the ones to broker [and] negotiate" it.

Blagojevich has yet to be cross-examined by prosecutors. But they are likely to point out, as they often have, that there was, in fact, no Madigan "deal," because the Madigans were not approached about it.

The former governor and his attorney tried to stay one step ahead of that argument. Blagojevich testified he was trying to "line up everyone I could [in support of the deal] before [making] the ask."

(AP Photo/M. Spencer Green, File)

Categories: Criminal Justice
Tags: crime

AP - Illinois Public Media News - June 02, 2011

Blagojevich Starting to Crumble on the Stand

(With additional reporting from The Associated Press)

For much of his time on the stand in his corruption retrial, former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich has been engaging, articulate, funny and most importantly, believable, but that's changing, and on Wednesday he was struggling to explain his own words to jurors.

His attorney, Aaron Goldstein, started leading him through some of the more damning evidence related to appointing a senator to replace Barack Obama. Even with his lawyer's softball questions, Blagojevich was flustered.

On one tape, Blagojevich talks about Valerie Jarrett, an adviser to Obama. Blagojevich says Jarrett knows that he's willing to appoint her to the Senate. He wonders how much she wants the position and how hard she'll push to get Blagojevich an appointment to Obama's cabinet.

Blagojevich insists the two weren't connected. Goldstein asked what Blagojevich meant when he talked about this. Instead of answering, Blagojevich reread the transcript while mumbling and finally said "I don't know what I'm saying here," and then asked his attorney to help him.

The ousted Illinois governor is expected to testify further Thursday about the allegation that he sought to sell or trade President Barack Obama's vacated U.S. Senate seat.

The 54-year-old faces 20 criminal counts, including attempted extortion and conspiracy to commit bribery. He denies all wrongdoing.

(Robert Wildeboer/IPR)


AP - Illinois Public Media News - June 01, 2011

Mumbai Terror Trial in Chicago Winding Down

The trial of a Chicago businessman accused in the 2008 Mumbai attacks is winding down faster than expected.

Judge Harry Leinenweber says closing arguments are planned for Tuesday.

Proceedings in Tahawwur Rana's terrorism trial ended Wednesday after prosecutors called seven witnesses.

They included FBI agents who verified communication between Rana, the government's star witness David Coleman Headley and others.

Jurors don't return to court until Monday because attorneys had trouble scheduling witnesses. The trial runs a four-day schedule.

Headley pleaded guilty to scouting sites for the attacks and agreed to testify against Rana.

Rana has pleaded not guilty to providing Headley with cover as he took video surveillance in Mumbai.

Categories: Criminal Justice
Tags: crime

AP - Illinois Public Media News - June 01, 2011

Judge to Blagojevich: Stop Smuggling in Testimony

An angry judge chastised ousted Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich on Wednesday for "smuggling" testimony into his political corruption retrial that the judge had previously ruled inadmissible.

Judge James Zagel said Blagojevich has insisted on mentioning issues or opinions that the judge has ruled shouldn't be cited in front of the jury. He warned him sharply not to do it again.

"This is a deliberate effort by this witness to raise something that he can't raise," Zagel said. "This is not fair, this is a repeated example of a defendant who wants to say something by smuggling (it) in."

Zagel, who sent the jury out of the room before admonishing Blagojevich, implied that the former governor's motives were less than pure.

"I make a ruling, and then the ruling is disregarded, and then I have to say, 'Don't do it,'" Zagel said. "And when you do that more than once or twice, it is inevitable that I'm going to believe that there is some purpose other than the pursuit of truth."

The judge had said earlier that Blagojevich wasn't allowed to tell jurors that he thought his plans to seek a top job in exchange for appointing someone to President Barack Obama's vacated U.S. Senate seat were legal.

At a hearing without jurors present, Blagojevich told Zagel that he wanted to testify that he believed he wasn't crossing any lines by asking Obama to appoint him to an ambassadorship or Cabinet post in exchange for appointing the president-elect's choice for the seat.

But Zagel was largely unswayed, ruling that jurors won't be allowed to hear any opinions about legality.

"The fact that he thinks it is legal is not relevant here," Zagel said.

Prosecutors had fought to keep Blagojevich from talking about the legal issue, and it's unclear how radically it will affect Blagojevich's testimony going forward or his defense strategy.

Jurors finally began hearing from Blagojevich about the Senate seat Tuesday after three days of testimony in which he had focused on accusations that he attempted to shake down executives for campaign cash. He began delving into the Senate seat charge toward the end of that day.

Blagojevich told jurors he wasn't enticed by an alleged pay-to-play proposal from fundraisers close to U.S. Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. to raise millions of dollars in campaign cash if Blagojevich named Jackson to the seat.

"That's illegal," Blagojevich said. "I was opposed to the offer of fundraising in exchange for the Senate seat."

Blagojevich also echoed a long-held defense argument that all the FBI wiretaps that capture him talking on the telephone about how he might benefit from naming someone to seat was just that - talk.

Asked by his attorney, Aaron Goldstein, if he spoke frequently about the seat in the weeks before his arrest on Dec. 9, 2008, Blagojevich did not miss a beat.

"Absolutely, yes. Incessantly," said Blagojevich.

He explained that his method for arriving at a decision on the seat was to talk with as many confidants and as often as possible.

"I wanted to be very careful to invite a full discussion of ideas ... good ones, bad ones, stupid ones," he said. He added, "There was a method to the madness."

The twice-elected governor briefly mentioned that he got word in November 2008 that Obama appeared to be interested in seeing family friend and fellow Chicago Democrat Valerie Jarrett named as his replacement.

Prosecutors played a recording during their three-week case where Blagojevich asks one aide about appointing Jarrett, "We could get something for that couldn't we?" He mentions the possibility of a Cabinet post.

Blagojevich told jurors he had in mind what he described as legal, political horse-trading.

At the end of those proceedings, prosecutors complained that Blagojevich seemed to be resorting to arguments that Zagel explicitly ruled he could not make, including that he was merely engaging in the kind of wheeling and dealing all politicians engage in.

Zagel agreed, warning defense attorneys then that he would likely instruct jurors before they began deliberating that any defense based on the theory that everybody does it isn't valid.

"There's legal horse-trading and there's also illegal horse-trading," Zagel said.

Blagojevich, 54, denies all wrongdoing. He faces 20 criminal counts, including attempted extortion, conspiracy to commit bribery and wire fraud. In his first trial last year, a hung jury agreed on just one count - convicting Blagojevich of lying to the FBI.

(AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)


AP - Illinois Public Media News - May 31, 2011

Blagojevich Denies He Used State Action to Force Donations

(With additional reporting from The Associated Press)

Former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich, testifying for a third day at his federal corruption trial, disputed prosecution claims that he tried to leverage state action for campaign donations.

Race track bill

Guided by his attorney, Aaron Goldstein, Blagojevich provided his defense to government charges that he tried to get campaign donations in 2008 by withholding his signature from a bill that would benefit the horse race track industry.

Prosecutors had played secretly-taped conversations between Blagojevich and his former chief of staff, Lon Monk, who was working as a lobbyist for the industry. The government alleges Blagojevich and Monk were trying to squeeze money from the racetrack-owning Johnston family in exchange for signing the legislation.

In his testimony Tuesday, Blagojevich said he had a couple reasons - entirely legal ones - for withholding his signature on the bill. First, he said he wanted to consider the legislation as part of his broader plan to use his amendatory veto power, what he called his "Rewrite to do right campaign."

Second, Blagojevich said he was nervous that he would sign the bill around the same time that a campaign donation from the Johnstons would arrive. He said he believed the donation was "imminent" based on his conversations with Monk, and didn't want there to be a perception that he signed the bill because of the money. He noted he'd been "stung" by a similar allegation in the past.

Tollway construction

Also Tuesday, Blagojevich addressed accusations that he tried to shake down road construction bigwig Gerald Krozel, by holding back approval for a major tollway project. The ex-governor, in his testimony, sought to provide another reason for his reluctance to move forward with expansion: that he was trying to get the legislature to approve with a much larger statewide construction plan, known as the capital bill.

The defense played a secretly recorded conversation between Blagojevich and his chief of staff at the time, John Harris. In it, they talked about a request from then-DuPage County Board Chair Bob Schillerstrom to include a western access road to O'Hare Airport in the tollway plan. Blagojevich scoffed at the request, as he wanted Schillerstrom to use his political heft to pressure House Speaker Mike Madigan to call for a vote on the larger capital bill.

That recording included several expletives from Blagojevich, which the ex-governor addressed on the stand.

"You had to pick one of me swearing, eh?" he asked his attorney. Then, to the jury, "I'm sorry again about that language."

The former governor also discussed a meeting he had with Krozel at his campaign offices. Krozel testified that at this meeting he felt Blagojevich was linking campaign donations and the expanded tollway plan, which would provide obvious benefits to Krozel's industry.

Blagojevich acknowledged both topics came up at the meeting. He said he talked to Krozel about a new ethics law, which restricted political donations from state contractors beginning on January 1, 2009.

"The good news for you and bad news for me is you can't contribute money to me anymore," Blagojevich recalled telling Krozel. "This is your last hurrah."

Blagojevich denied threatening or demanding that Krozel fundraise for him. He said the construction executive told him he wanted to help.

Blagojevich's team has yet to address the most headline-grabbing allegations against their client. He is accused of trying to personally profit from his power to fill the U.S. Senate seat that President Barack Obama vacated in late 2008.

Children's hospital

Blagojevich testifed Tuesday that "whenever a baseball manager calls me...I call them back." Such was the case when former Cubs manager Dusty Baker called Blagojevich in 2008 to ask him to help out Children's Memorial Hospital. The hospital's executive ended up asking Blagojevich to push through a Medicaid reimbursement rate increase for pediatricians.

Budget times were tight, but Blagojevich said he agreed. The governor said he told his deputy governor, Bob Greenlee, to get it done. He said Greenlee eventually told him he'd found the money to make it happen, effective after January 1, 2009.

Prosecutors allege Blagojevich was trying to get fundraising help from Patrick Magoon, and actually ordered the rate increase be put on hold when Magoon resisted. Blagojevich dismissed that claim, noting that he thought the rate increase was set. "My state of mind was it was done," he testified.

Blagojevich says the hospital was "a personal place" for him because a cousin died there in the 1960s.

Blagojevich's binder blunder

Shortly after Blagojevich began testifying Tuesday morning, the judge halted the proceedings and sent the jury out of the room because the ex-governor's microphone kept going on-and-off. Court staff soon discovered the problem: Blagojevich's binder, containing transcripts of wiretaps, "was resting on the on-and-off switch."

"You got to watch that binder, Rod," Goldstein told his client after the jury returned.

"Evidently it was my fault," replied Blagojevich.

Past conviction

Blagojevich has denied all wrongdoing since his arrest on December 9, 2008. Less than two months later, he was impeached and removed from office by the Illinois General Assembly. Since then, he's waged a very public campaign, declaring his innocence at every turn. He hosted a radio show on a local station, appeared in Celebrity Apprentice and acted as a pitchman for pistachios.

Blagojevich faces 20 federal charges, including wire fraud, attempted extortion, conspiracy to commit extortion, bribery and conspiracy to commit bribery. This is the ex-governor's second trial, after a different jury last summer deadlocked on all but one count. It found him guilty of lying to federal investigators, a charge that carries a maximum of 5 years in prison and a $250,000 fine.

Goldstein briefly asked Blagojevich about that conviction on Tuesday. The ex-governor acknowledged he was found guilty, and said Judge James Zagel is responsible for sentencing him. Goldstein then told Blagojevich he would move on to another subject, to which the defendant replied, "Please do."

Making faces

When the jury was out of the courtroom on a break, Blagojevich attorney Lauren Kaesberg told Judge Zagel that she has witnessed prosecutors making faces and engaging in "animated discussion" that jurors were noticing.

Prosecutor Reid Schar denied this, and Zagel said he had not noticed it.

The government made a similar complaint about Blagojevich during the first trial.

There were only 17 jurors listening to testimony today, down one from the standard of 18. It is not uncommon for one or two jurors to withdraw during a trial. It can sometime happen for health or personal reasons.

(AP Photo/Tom Gianni)


AP - Illinois Public Media News - May 31, 2011

Credibility of Government’s Top Witness Questioned in Mumbai Terror Case

Defense attorneys for a Chicago businessman accused in the 2008 Mumbai attacks are trying to undermine the credibility of an admitted terrorist who is serving as the government's star witness.

David Coleman Headley returns to the witness stand Tuesday to face questions from defense attorneys for Tahawwur Rana. He's accused of helping Headley, his longtime friend, lay the groundwork for the attacks that left more than 160 people dead in in India's largest city.

Headley has already pleaded guilty and agreed to testify against Rana, who is accused of providing a cover as Headley conducted surveillance for the attacks.

Rana's attorneys say Headley's testimony isn't credible because he's lied in the past. They went after his credibility last week, and told a judge they're just getting started. Headley has already pleaded guilty and agreed to testify against Rana, who is accused of providing a cover as Headley conducted surveillance for the attacks.

Rana's attorneys say Headley's testimony isn't credible because he's lied in the past. They went after his credibility last week, and told a judge they're just getting started.


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