Illinois Public Media News

AP - Illinois Public Media News - August 01, 2011

Asset Sales Raise $7 Million for Victims of Decatur Ponzi Scheme

Sales of homes, jewelry and other assets that once belonged to a former Decatur resident convicted of investment fraud have raised more than $7 million. But that's less than a third of the money William Huber was convicted of stealing.

The (Decatur) Herald & Review reports (http://bit.ly/pVqG6C) that court documents indicate most of Huber's former assets have been found and sold.

That includes homes in Florida and California as well as cars and clothes. One of the more recent sales was $39,000 worth of jewelry.

Huber was sentenced to 20 years in prison in December after he pleaded guilty to running a Ponzi scheme that stole $23 million from investors.

Huber is now 62 and in prison in California. He's appealing his sentence claiming it's too long.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - August 01, 2011

Judge Sets Blagojevich Sentencing Date

A federal judge has set an Oct. 6 sentencing date for ousted Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich.

Judge James Zagel set the date during a status hearing Monday. Blagojevich didn't attend the hearing.

Legal observers say Zagel is likely to sentence Blagojevich to about 10 years for a lone conviction at his first trial and convictions on 17 corruption counts at his retrial. The retrial convictions in June included trying to sell or trade President Barack Obama's vacated Senate seat.

Blagojevich was last in court in July to sign papers putting up his home and another property as collateral for a $450,000 bond that lets him remain free while awaiting sentencing. The 54-year-old did appear last month to sign papers putting up his home and another property as collateral for a $450,000 bond that lets him remain free while awaiting sentencing.

(AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato)


AP - Illinois Public Media News - July 28, 2011

Caterpillar to Pay $2.55 M for Air Act Violations

The U.S. Department of Justice says Caterpillar Inc. has agreed to pay $2.55 million to settle allegations that it violated the U.S. Clean Air Act.

The department said Thursday that it believed the Peoria-based heavy equipment-maker had shipped more than 590,000 engines that lacked proper emissions controls. The engines were for vehicles made for highway travel and for other purposes.

Engines lacking such controls can emit excess nitrogen oxides and other pollutants that can harm human health.

As part of a consent decree signed with the department, Caterpillar also must continue recalling the engines to make repairs.

Caterpillar spokeswoman Bridget Young says the company denies any wrongdoing and will comply with the decree.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - July 27, 2011

Savoy Man Who Killed Brother Gets 35-Year Prison Sentence

A 35-year prison sentence awaits a Savoy man who shot and killed his brother inside Tolono's only grocery store.

Forty-three year old Brian Maggio has already been jailed for slightly over a year - he will be required to serve 100 percent of the murder sentence for the death of his 32 year old brother Mark.

Mark Maggio was killed during an argument inside the Tolono IGA, which never reopened after the shooting.

Brian Maggio owned that store while his younger brother owned the IGA in Arcola, but the two had a history of financial disputes.

Brian Maggio pleaded guilty to the murder last month - state's attorney Julia Rietz says while Maggio's attorney had asked for a 20 year sentence, the judge decided to order the maximum allowed under the plea agreement.

Categories: Criminal Justice
Tags: crime

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - July 26, 2011

Blagojevich Files for New Trial

Former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich is asking a federal judge for a new trial after being convicted last month on 17 counts of corruption, including trying to sell a vacant U.S. Senate seat.

Blagojevich's lawyers filed a 158-page motion with 10 different categories detailing why they think the former governor didn't get a fair trial.

In a signed affidavit, Blagojevich stated that he only took the stand because his attorneys assured him he would be able to tell jurors he sincerely believed his actions had been legal. He added that he would not have waived his constitutional right to not testify had he known Judge James Zagel would sustain prosecutors' objections whenever he started talking about the perceived legality of his actions.

In the filing, Blagojevich's attorneys say Judge Zagel tried to read the mind of defense lawyers, limiting which topics they could and couldn't bring up. Attorneys also assert Zagel should have allowed the defense to play secretly-recorded conversations in which Blagojevich talked about appointing Attorney General Lisa Madigan to a vacant senate seat.

Defense attorneys says that prosecutors tainted the jury pool by holding a press conference the day Blagojevich was arrested.

In the filing - defense attorneys say even before the trial began - they tried to make sure people like Juror #116 didn't get on the jury. Juror #116 said he believed Blagojevich was guilty, but the judge let him pass through.

On the other hand - Blagojevich's attorneys say Juror #213 should not only have sat on the jury - but also should get an award - because she said defendants are innocent until proven guilty. That juror was dismissed from the jury pool.

A hearing is scheduled before the judge next week.

(AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast, File)


AP - Illinois Public Media News - July 26, 2011

Bill Would Free Cook County Inmates Wanted by ICE

A Cook County commissioner is quietly proposing an ordinance that would require the county's massive jail to release some inmates wanted by immigration authorities.

Sponsored by Jesús García, (D-Chicago), the measure would prohibit the jail from holding inmates based on an Immigration and Customs Enforcement request unless they have been convicted of a felony or two misdemeanors, and unless the county gets reimbursed.

The legislation's preamble states complying with the ICE detainers "places a great strain on our communities by eroding the public trust that local law enforcement depends on to secure the accurate reporting of criminal activity and to prevent and solve crimes."

The jail now holds detainees requested by ICE for up to 48 hours after their criminal cases would allow them to walk free. Sheriff Tom Dart's office said the jail turns over about a half dozen inmates to the federal agency each business day.

Dart this month told Illinois Public Radio station, WBEZ, that his staff was exploring legal options for releasing some of these inmates. The sheriff said his review began after he noticed that San Francisco County Sheriff Michael Hennessey had ordered his department to quit honoring certain ICE detainers beginning June 1.

If Dart's office follows Hennessey's path or if García's legislation wins approval, Cook County could become the nation's largest local jurisdiction to halt blanket compliance with ICE holds.

"Cook County would be a counter pole to Arizona's Maricopa County," said Chris Newman, general counsel of the National Day Laborer Organizing Network, a Los Angeles-based group that opposes involving local authorities in immigration enforcement.

García's office didn't return WBEZ calls or messages about his legislation. The offices of Sheriff Dart and Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle said they had viewed the bill but declined to say whether they supported it.

A spokeswoman for Cook County State's Attorney Anita Alvarez said late Tuesday her office had not been consulted about García's proposal. A 2009 letter from Alvarez to Dart's office said federal law required the sheriff to comply with "any ICE detainers" lodged with the jail.

In recent months, however, immigration authorities have acknowledged that local jails do not have to comply with the detainers.

Asked for comment about García's legislation, ICE spokeswoman Leticia Zamarripa sent a statement calling the detainers "critical" for deporting "criminal aliens and others who have no legal right to remain in the United States."

"Individuals arrested for misdemeanors may ultimately be identified as recidivist offenders with multiple prior arrests, in addition to being in violation of U.S. immigration law," the ICE statement said. "These individuals may have been deported before or have outstanding orders of removal."

Jurisdictions that ignore immigration detainers would be responsible for "possible public safety risks," the statement added.

García's proposal is on the county board's agenda for Wednesday morning. Possible steps by commissioners include referring the measure to committee or approving it immediately.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - July 20, 2011

Attorney Seeks $340,000 from Davlin Estate

An attorney is seeking more than $340,000 from the estate of former Springfield Mayor Tim Davlin, who committed suicide last year.

The lawyer represents the estate of Margaret Ettelbrick. She was Davlin's cousin, and he became executor for her estate after she died in 2003.

The claims filed against Davlin's estate allege that he sold Ettelbrick's house for about $46,000 less than it was worth, spent more than $85,000 for his personal benefit and used more than $200,000 to buy stock in a company.

The (Springfield) State Journal-Register reports that the claims were filed by Kevin McDermott, the Sangamon County public administrator who is administering Ettelbrick's estate.

Davlin shot himself in December on the day he was due in court to answer questions about her estate.

(AP Photo/Tom Gannam)


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - July 15, 2011

Tenants Still Living at Cherry Orchard, Restraining Order Extended

(Reported by Pam Dempsey of CU-CitizenAccess)

People are still living at the Cherry Orchard Village apartments, located just north of Thomasboro.

Champaign County Judge John Kennedy extended a temporary restraining order Friday that gives public health officials the power to keep one building on the property closed. He first issued the order last week after several witnesses testified that people were still living in one of the buildings on the property.

Bernard and Eduardo Ramos, managers of the complex, were ordered in April to vacate all of the building on the property after they were found guilty of failing to legally connect and repair sewage systems for six of the eight buildings on the property. In addition, they were fined more than $54,000 following the conclusion of a civil case filed by the Champaign-Urbana Public Health District.

During several inspections, county health department officials have found raw sewage on top of the ground and discovered sewage flowing into a neighboring farmer's tile. The case was opened in 2007 and filed in court in 2010 after the Ramoses failed to remedy the problems.

The raw sewage poses serious health risks for both the tenants at Cherry Orchard and people they come in contact with - such as Hepatitis A, E. Coli and Salmonella , health officials said.

The temporary restraining order allowed officials to board up one building on the property - known as the "Jones Building"- post signs warning people to keep out and secure lids on open septic tanks.

Public health officials also spent last weekend evicting about 60 people from the Jones Building. Those tenants moved to Danville, said Julie Pryde, administrator for the Champaign-Urbana Public Health District.

Yet people continue to live in another building on the complex - a two-unit apartment building on the west side of the property, she said.

"I have no idea who is living up there," Pryde said after Friday's hearing. "We have seen at least four people, we've also seen four vehicles and a dog so it's anybody guess how many people are actually occupying the buildings over there."

The judge granted an extension of the restraining order until the next hearing on the case, which is to take place by September.

Bernard and Eduardo Ramos did not come to Friday's hearing or have representation. They have repeatedly declined to comment to the media and have yet to be arrested on two outstanding warrants. Kennedy amended the arrest warrant last week and required that the two be jailed until the Cherry Orchard property is empty or the sewage system is repaired.

(Photo courtesy of the Champaign-Urbana Public Health District)

Categories: Criminal Justice
Tags: crime

AP - Illinois Public Media News - July 15, 2011

Blagojevich Returns to Court to Hear Bond Details

Former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich told a federal judge Friday that he understands he could lose his home if he violates the conditions of his bond.

Lawyers for Blagojevich say the former governor and his wife are trying to sell their home on Chicago's North Side. News of the home sale came during the hearing where Judge James Zagel increased Blagojevich's bond to $450,000.

The former governor is considered a greater flight risk now that he is facing substantial prison time.

The Blagojevich's are using their home and a condo to secure the bond, but Blagojevich's attorneys hoped to exclude the house to make it easier to sell. Judge Zagel said both properties have to be put up.

"Patti and I were here to comply as we always try to do, with all the different rules and we signed all the necessary papers to comply with the bond requirements," Blagojevich said after the hearing.

The Blagojevich's say between their home and condo, they have about $600,000 in equity.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - July 14, 2011

Prosecutors: Blagojevich Not Fulfilling Bond Terms

Attorneys for Rod Blagojevich have asked a judge for permission to speak with the jurors who recently convicted the impeached Illinois governor on multiple corruption charges.

A filing with U.S. District Court on Thursday seeks access to jurors as the defense prepares post-trial motions. It doesn't specify the motions, but it's widely expected Blagojevich will appeal his convictions.

Defense attorneys often interview jurors about how they reached a verdict in a search for fodder that could bolster their appeal.

Jurors found the 54-year-old Blagojevich guilty on 17 of 20 counts, including attempted extortion for trying to sell or trade President Barack Obama's vacated U.S. Senate seat.

Several jurors told reporters after the retrial they liked Blagojevich and hoped to acquit him. But they said they believed the evidence was overwhelming.


Page 88 of 123 pages ‹ First  < 86 87 88 89 90 >  Last ›