Illinois Public Media News

AP - Illinois Public Media News - December 15, 2010

George Ryan’s Wife Has Months to Live, According to Doctors

Doctors say the former first lady of Illinois, Lura Lynn Ryan has terminal lung cancer with only three to six months to live.

The details of Mrs. Ryan's health were revealed in a letter filed in federal court this afternoon. Former Governor George Ryan is appealing parts of his conviction and asking the court to let him out of prison on bail while his appeal is considered so that he can be with his ailing wife.

According to a letter written by the medical director of Rush Riverside Cancer Institute in Kankakee, Mrs. Ryan had a CT scan on Monday which showed a mass in the left lower lung that measured up to 7 centimeters in diameter. A scan on Tuesday confirmed the growth.

Doctors say lesions in the liver and bones suggest an aggressive cancer and given her age and condition. They say Ryan could have as little as three months if their preliminary diagnosis is correct.

Prosecutors have argued against releasing Governor Ryan saying it is the sad fact that all prisoners are separated from their families during trying times.

(Photo courtesy of the Kankakee Public Library)


AP - Illinois Public Media News - December 14, 2010

Police Say Springfield Mayor Tim Davlin Found Dead In His Home

Illinois State Police were investigating the death of Springfield's mayor, whose body was found in his home on Tuesday after he failed to show up for a court hearing in a probate case involving his late cousin's estate.

Police Chief Robert Williams said officers responded to a 911 call shortly before 9 a.m. Tuesday at Timothy Davlin's home and found the 53-year-old Democratic mayor dead.

Williams declined to immediately offer details about how Davlin died, saying the investigation was in its infancy and has been turned over to the Illinois State Police, which also deferred specifics about the matter.

"The situation is very dynamic and evolving as we go,'' Williams told reporters. "That's all I'm at liberty to state at this time.''

The State Journal-Register in Springfield reported Tuesday that Davlin - mayor of Illinois' 120,000-resident capital city since April 2003 - failed to appear in court that morning as ordered in a probate case involving the estate of one of his cousins, Margaret Ettelbrick, who died in 2003. After Davlin's no-show, Circuit Judge Pete Cavanagh removed him as the estate's administrator.

The newspaper reported that Davlin failed to meet a court deadline for a financial accounting of the estate. Patrick "Tim'' Timoney withdrew as lawyer for the estate in October, saying he could not come up with a final accounting because Davlin had not provided documentation. Timoney last week submitted a claim against the estate for more than $19,000 in legal fees.

Cavanagh ordered Davlin and Bradley Huff, an attorney for Catholic Charities of Springfield, to appear for Tuesday's hearing to discuss the accounting and the status of attorneys in the estate case.

In October, the newspaper reported that Davlin owed the federal government nearly $90,000 in unpaid income taxes, and liens had been filed against his home. The lien notice filed in the Sangamon County recorder's office showed that Davlin owed income taxes for the years 2003, 2005 and 2006.

At the time, the mayor blamed the problem on a dispute with the IRS over taxes owed on investments he cashed in to buy the home. Sangamon County property records have shown that Davlin bought the home for $237,500 in 2004.

He earned more than $119,000 a year, according to city payroll records from earlier in 2010.

Gov. Pat Quinn called Davlin's death "truly a tragedy,'' saying in a statement that Davlin "was a great public servant who loved Springfield and its people.''

"The city of Springfield is a better place because of his leadership,'' Quinn said. "He was not only a champion for Springfield, but also for the entire state, and he will be greatly missed by all who knew him.''

Davlin announced last month that he would not seek a third four-year term, telling Springfield radio station WFMB he wanted to leave office before getting burned out. Davlin insisted at that time that financial issues had nothing to do with that decision involving the nonpartisan post he called "grueling.''

"No one has any idea what it's like until they've been there,'' he told the station.

Davlin was a political novice when elected in 2003, having been an insurance and investment broker after graduating from a local high school and getting an associate degree from Springfield College before attending what now is the University of Illinois at Springfield.

As mayor, Davlin welcomed the 2005 opening of the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum and helped guide the city less than a year later through the aftermath of a tornado, marshaling hundreds of workers and thousands of volunteers in the cleanup effort.

In his biography posted on the city's website, Davlin lists among his credits his creation of an education liaison tasked with working with local schools, his stumping for a student-driven recycling program, and his formation of a task force on homelessness.

Davlin, a father of four, has four grandchildren.

An alderman, Frank Kunz, is mayor pro tem. City law requires that a new mayor be selected within 60 days.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - December 14, 2010

Budget Limitations Damper U of I’s Ability to Catch Copper Thieves

The theft of more than $10,000 worth of copper building materials taken last week from the University of Illinois' Natural History Building has prompted university police to look at efforts to protect its other copper-rich buildings.

Skip Frost, the Patrol Division Commander with the University's police department, said the incident was the largest of its kind on campus in recent memory. Frost said the university is in talks with building contractors to figure what can be done to prevent more thefts from happening.

"What we'd like to do and what we're able to do are two different things," Frost explained. "There are so many things that could be done, including securing (copper) in a better fashion, having better key card access, and improving locks, but you can put all those things in there, that does not mean crime is not going to occur."

Copper prices went up in November, and have continued to rise this month, reaching more than $4.00 per pound. Ameren spokesperson Brianne Lindemann said she expects there will be more thefts from homes and businesses as commodity prices for copper go up.

"You need to secure any building that you have," Lindemann cautioned. "You definitely want to keep some lights on. You just want to make sure that those buildings look like somebody has been in there.

Tags: crime, economy

AP - Illinois Public Media News - December 08, 2010

Falsely Accused Cop Getting Hate Mail

A lawyer for a police officer falsely accused of shootings along the Illinois-Indiana state border says his client's been receiving hate mail.

Authorities arrested Brian Dorian as the gunman in the Oct. 5 shootings that left one man dead and two others injured. But days later they ruled him out as a suspect.

Dorian was cleared after detectives verified he'd been home logged onto his computer on the morning of the attacks and so could not possibly have been involved.

The investigation into the shootings has apparently stalled, with investigators saying they have no suspects. But attorney Bob O'Dekirk said he fears Dorian will continue to be wrongly viewed with suspicion by some until there is an arrest.

Categories: Criminal Justice
Tags: crime

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - November 17, 2010

Police Training Institute Expected to Close By End of Year

The University of Illinois plans to close its Police Training Institute by the end of 2011.

The decision to eliminate the training facility comes after a budget review panel raised concerns about the institute's long term economic stability.

The latest in a series of Urbana campus reviews looking at cost-saving measures at the U of I said there is no justification for the university to provide $900,000 a year to train police officers.

"We believe this decision to be necessary because we cannot justify using resources to fund PTI that derive from student tuition and the shrinking state funding available for our core education and research missions," according to the 'Next Steps' letter released by Interim Chancellor and Provost Robert Easter and Interim Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs as part of a recent 'Stewarding Excellence' report. "Fundamentally, our primary mission of educating lllinois' undergraduate, graduate and professional students must remain a priority."

U of I spokeswoman Robin Kaler said the university can no longer rely on tuition dollars to keep the program going.

"The university has a very proud history of supporting law enforcement training," Kaler said. "Funding for this purpose hasn't kept pace with the increase in costs, and so we had to review where this kind of training falls within the missions and the priorities of the campus as a whole."

With the closure of the 55-year-old training program, Champaign County Sheriff Dan Walsh predicts that police training will be moved to the Illinois State Police Training Academy in Springfield. Walsh, who was trained at the PTI and now teaches there, said it is unfortunate that the program will leave the university.

"I think it is advantageous to have it part of the University of Illinois because the police officers then at least socially during the 12 weeks there here can interact with students from literally around the world," Walsh said. "I think it's a good thing for diversity training."

The PTI has cut its expenses by 45 percent in the last three years, and the report said the institute could improve its cost structure by trimming $666,251 from its budget. Still, the commission said the chances that the institute will latch onto additional funding or new partnerships are slim. The PTI is considered Illinois' flagship training facility.

(Photo courtesy of the Police Training Institute)


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - November 12, 2010

University Town Hall Meeting to Address Campus Violence

University of Illinois officials are holding a forum Saturday afternoon to address the U of I's response to the recent wave of campus violence.

On Monday, a student was sexually assaulted in a dormitory bathroom. Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Renée Romano said that attack prompted U of I officials to organize the meeting, which she hopes will help inform parents about what they can do to protect students.

"Students are in a lot of contact with their parents," Romano said. "So parents can remind their students to lock their doors, remind their students to use safe walks, to walk with friends, to use safe rides, and that sort of thing."

The university in recent weeks has agreed to hire more police officers, installed dozens of security cameras, and activated a call center where operators who can answer questions about the attacks. Romano added that she hopes this town hall meeting will encourage students to come forward if they witness violence.

"If they report a crime or if they see something suspicious, and perhaps they've been drinking," she said. "They're not going to get a drinking ticket."

U of I Police Chief Barbara O'Connor reported that police have made more than 25 arrests related to the campus assaults and robberies.

The town hall meeting will start Saturday at 3pm at the Illini Union's Courtyard Cafe. The event will be streamed live at http://illinois.edu/here_now/videos.html as well as for viewing at a later time. Questions may be phoned in during the meeting at 217-244-8938.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - November 09, 2010

U of I Activates Call Center Following Campus Attacks

A string of campus assaults and robberies in recent weeks has led the University of Illinois to activate its campus call center for the first time.

The latest incident involved a U of I freshman who was sexually abused Monday morning in a dormitory shower. University police Chief Barbara O'Connor said just in the last day, the university has been flooded with about a hundred e-mail and phone messages regarding that attack.

"You know, whenever we get parent calls and or e-mails, we attempt to take an individualized approach to responding to those, but at some point, the volume becomes so significant that you can't keep doing that any longer," O'Connor said. "We're at that point."

She said the call center will allow the university to give plenty of attention to each caller, and give university police more time to investigate criminal activity.

"We can get inundated so much so that the work of doing the investigation can get bogged down in responding to e-mails and phone calls," O'Connor explained.

University spokeswoman Robin Kaler said the 60 volunteers who have agreed to help out at the call center work in student affairs, and have extensive experience handling privacy issues. They were each required to go through a 90-minute training session before they could start working the phones.

The U of I community is encouraged to forward all messages regarding crime and safety on campus to 217-333-0050.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - November 06, 2010

Two Women Charged in Thefts from UI Library

University of Illinois police say a raid on the apartment of two Champaign women has led to the recovery of some 100 DVDs and video games stolen from the University of Illinois Undergraduate Library. The DVDs and games were reportedly worth about $2,700.

Authorities say 21-year-old U of I student Laura Cordova and Victoria Lopez, who is also 21, were arraigned Friday in Champaign County Circuit Court on felony charges of burglary and theft. Lopez was also charged with misuse of a credit card.

Campus police say security cameras showed two women stealing on Sept. 29

Pictures of the women were circulated on campus, leading to tips from the public.

Cordova and Lopez were released on $2,000 bond apiece and they are ordered to return to court Jan. 4 with their public defenders.

Categories: Criminal Justice
Tags: crime

AP - Illinois Public Media News - October 25, 2010

Champaign Cty Sheriff Says Opponent’s Proposals for Serving Subpoenas Won’t Save Money

The former Champaign County Sheriff's deputy waging a write-in campaign for sheriff says poor fiscal management in that department prompted him to run.

Jerommie Smith of Sidney said last year alone, deputies served more than 12,000 summons, subpoenas, and evictions, and attempted to serve 15,000 more. He said that is cutting down on training time for deputies, and their ability to patrol the streets. Smith said the department could also save money by hiring out a private agency to serve those papers.

"You look at the private agency, and see that's a flat fee of 35 dollars," Smith said. "I've spoken to other people that say that most of the time, it only costs us 35 dollars. If you figure the time to pick up that piece of paper and take it and serve it, by the time you pay the deputy's wages, and with mileage, you're probably at 50 to 60 dollars."

Sheriff Dan Walsh said serving those papers only takes a deputy a minute, while the civil duties generate more than $200,000 towards their salaries. He added that his department is hardly in a position to pay an agency, with cuts of more than 11-percent the last couple of years.

"As they're out there serving papers, what's the difference if I'm 'patrolling' or I'm driving down Vine Street to go serve a paper on the Urbana Chief?" Walsh asked. "I'm still there, and if I see something, I'm going to take action. So, I don't think that's a good idea at all, and I don't think it really takes away from their ability to patrol."

Smith's campaign as an independent was cut short because more than 500 petition signatures were declared invalid after a supporter of Walsh challenged them. He said those voters had yet to change their address, and a write-in campaign is a bit of a challenge. He said according to Champaign County Clerk's Office, anyone wanting to vote for him can simply mark 'J Smith' in the write-in space.

Smith, who operates a gym in Urbana, said he is getting a lot of support in door to door campaigns.

Walsh has been sheriff since December of 2002. He said facing his first election challenge has occupied his evenings and weekends, but not regular work hours.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - October 22, 2010

ISU Fires McLean County Board Member Following Domestic Battery Arrest

Illinois State University has fired a McLean County board member from his job with the university's Office of Environmental Health and Safety.

The Bloomington Pantagraph reports that ISU sent 48-year-old Robert Nuckolls a certified letter on Wednesday informing him of his termination. The action came a month after Nuckolls was indicted on criminal charges related to a dispute with a woman who said Nuckolls restrained and injured her after she tried to end their relationship.

Nuckolls is charged with felony unlawful restraint and misdemeanor counts of domestic battery and interfering with the reporting of domestic violence.

The Pantagraph reports that attempts to contact Nuckolls for comment have been unsuccessful.

(Photo courtesy of the McLean County Government)

Categories: Criminal Justice, Politics
Tags: crime, politics

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