Illinois Public Media News

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - May 04, 2011

Wind Turbine Project Scrapped for UI Campus

The University of Illinois has scrapped a proposal to build a single wind turbine on the Urbana campus' South Farms site, citing the project's rising cost and its negative response from area residents.

The Board of Trustees' Audit, Budget, Finance and Facilities Committee chose not to advance the proposal, so it won't be voted on by the full board.

First introduced in 2003, the project has evolved over the last year, going from three wind turbines to only one. Earlier this year, the U of I sought an additional $700,000 for the project, bringing the overall cost to more than $5 million.

U of I spokesman Tom Hardy said the university will work with sustainability groups on the Urbana campus to come up with other energy projects.

"I think it's just a matter of going back and identifying those that can fit within a certain budget, and don't have a community impact that this one had," Hardy said.

Most of the funding for the wind turbine would have been supported by the university, with an additional $2 million dollars coming from a grant awarded by the Illinois Clean Energy Community Foundation The foundation said the grant will not be available if the wind turbine isn't built, but an official with the organization said the project's termination shouldn't affect future grant applications submitted by the U of I.

Kevin Wolz with the Student Sustainability Committee said he hopes funds reserved for the wind turbine support other environmental efforts, like campus composting, solar technology, and native landscaping.

"There is probably nothing we can do that can achieve the same symbolism that that turbine would have for campus sustainability in our movement," Wolz said. "That indeed will be the most difficult thing to replace.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - May 04, 2011

Don Gerard Sworn In as Champaign’s Next Mayor

The first city council meeting for Champaign's new mayor was an uneventful one. But Don Gerard will work to fulfill part of his campaign platform starting next week.

Gerard was sworn into office before the packed city council chambers Tuesday, a night where all votes were unanimous and the bills before the council prompted little conversation. But at next Tuesday's study session, the new mayor and council will revisit the cost-cutting proposals of ending overnight front desk hours at the police station, and reducing staff at one fire station. City leaders say $2-million in cuts are needed.

Gerard says he wants to look into spending some reserve funds and saving jobs. He says it's all in the interest of the taxpayer.

"I want to bring them all the services they deserve, and all the services they're paying for," said Gerard. "We have money in rainy day accounts, and I think it's raining. So I think it's time to decide if we can move some of that money around a little bit, and get us through as we meet the economic recovery here."

New District 5 Council member Paul Faraci, also sworn in Tuesday night, says he has no intention of cutting police or fire services. The state economic official says he was 'energized' by Tuesday night's crowd, and is anxious to get his feet wet.

"There's a lot of work to do, and we've got a lot of hard decisions to make in the future," Faraci said. "But I think the quality of the staff, the experience of the sitting city council and our new mayor, I look forward to getting a lot of things accomplished."

And Mayor Gerard wants to turn his attention to another group suffering from the poor economy - teenagers. He wants to start up a citywide teen summer job program.

"What are we doing with a generation of teenagers who have been displaced by adults who have taken part-time jobs and so forth just to make ends meet," said Gerard. "The job market in Champaign is really tough right now. The best way to keep our streets safe and our community healthy is have teenagers working."

In other business, Champaign's city council has gone on record opposing the state's decision to drop Health Alliance. The council Tuesday unanimously backed a resolution urging that the decision be re-examined. Company CEO Jeff Ingrum told the council that more than 30,000 state employees in Champaign County are covered by Health Alliance, and the state's decision could impact the local economy by more than $30-million. Ingrum says members would essentially be 'left to choose between their doctors and their wallets.'

A new recycling center is expected to open soon in Champaign. The council last night approved a special use permit for the drop-off facility operated by Green Purpose LLC located at 807 Pioneer Street, just to the south of where the city used to operate a facility of its own.

Categories: Economics, Government, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - May 03, 2011

U of I Academic Senate Cites Concerns Over IT Changes

A plan by University of Illinois administrators to place information technology directly under their control isn't sitting well with the Urbana campus Academic Senate.

The faculty-student body opposed the move Monday on a 61-to-14 vote. U of I Chemistry Professor Al Scheeline said consultants suggested the changes to IT just days before administrators approved them in February.

He said no faculty saw the report in that time, and they still don't have a clear idea of what the impact will be. Scheeline said the suggested savings of $18-million a year by the year 2013 are up in the air as well.

"Were the costs accurately figured out? Were the benefits accurately figured out? Was there sufficient breadth in looking at those costs and benefits? I have to clue to the answer of any of those questions," Wheeler said. "And I don't know we would have come up with any different answer if we had those answers, but the faculty just feels like it's been cut off from asking the right questions before precipitious actions were taken."

The Urbana campus Student Body President says plans to centralize Information Technology could mean a loss of autonomy for many who are used to making decisions at their level. David Olsen said the changes could take power away from faculty and researchers.

"How does academic and research educational IT fit into the broader IT picture, and how will that be impacted?" he said. "Will faculty and students who use these IT resources every day, especially in fields like computer science and electrical and computer engineering, how will those fields be affected?"

As with nearly all the votes taken by the Academic Senate, the vote is merely advisory. The Urbana campus' new Executive Chief Information Officer, Michael Hites, said the changes should allow the university to better prioritize certain projects, but he says some are misinterpreting the change in plans. He said the changes won't impact collegiate support groups or research departments like the National Center for Supercomputing Applications.

The Senate's Executive Committee and IT committee will continue to discuss the plans over the summer. Urbana campus Interim Vice Chancellor and Provost Richard Wheeler said the proof will come in the way the changes work out. But he said serious discussions on IT governance on campus are just getting under way.

"There are a lot of pretty good people who are applying themselves to coming up with solutions that will work." said Wheeler.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - May 02, 2011

Ind. Congressman Says bin Laden Death Opportunity for Change in Military Focus

A U.S. official says Osama bin Laden died firing at the Navy SEALs who stormed his compound.

A little more than a month before the Al Qaeda leader's death, the Congressional Research Service released a report estimating that U.S. operations in Iraq and Afghanistan in the last decade have cost about $1.3 trillion.

Congressman Todd Rokita (R-Indianapolis) sits on the House's budget committee. Rokita acknowledges that while bin Laden's death is a victory in the war on terror; it's also an opportunity for the United States to recognize another national security threat - its own debt.

"I see this as a silver lining as a breakthrough to the military industrial complex about how we really need to effectively fight the war on terrorism in the 21st century in a way that is economical and lets us live within our means," he said.

Rokita said more money should be going to support special ops campaigns...like the one that brought down bin Laden...and less on wars that drag on for years at a time and hurt the nation's economy.

"I think it might be more efficient and cheaper in the long run than sending brigades and units and boots on the ground all over the world."

Meanwhile, Congressman Tim Johnson (R- Urbana) released a statement, saying he looks forward to peace in the Middle East, and U.S. troops returning home from the region.

Categories: Economics, Government, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - April 28, 2011

Walgreens Buys Carle Retail Pharmacies

The Carle Foundation is selling its pharmacy division to Walgreens.

The drug store's purchase of Carle RxExpress will mean four of its pharmacy locations will close in the next two months. By May 31st, Carle pharmacies on Urbana's Cunningham Avenue and Windsor Road will close, along with the location in Danville. In June, Carle's South Clinic location will consolidate with main lobby pharmacy at Carle Hospital. The remaining six will stay open under the Walgreens banner, and Carle's remaining inventory will transfer to nearby Walgreens locations.

Carle Foundation Executive Vice President John Snyder said the retail pharmacy industry has become more competitive, with new consolidations. He said Walgreens can offer discounts on generics and 90-day prescriptions that Carle can't sustain. But Snyder said consumers using Carle pharmacy locations won't see a change in service.

"They have quite a bit of experience in taking over hospital pharmacies, as well as medical office building pharmacies," he said. "They don't run them like typical Walgreens stores. They do recognize there's a difference. Their plan is to run them basically as they're run now with the same hours, and hopefully the same staff."

Snyder says Walgreens has committed to hiring about 80-percent of Carle's 76 pharmacy workers, and will interview all who apply. He said other employees with the necessary skills will be offered the chance to transfer to other jobs at Carle, while remaining workers will receive a severance package. But Walgreens spokeswoman Tiffany Washington said there wasn't a specific figure, only saying that a 'large majority' or Carle RxExpress employees would still have positions at the pharmacies.

Financial terms of the sale weren't disclosed. Proceeds from the sale will go towards the purchase of new hospital facilities and equipment.

Categories: Business, Economics, Health

AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 27, 2011

Indiana Poised to Cut Planned Parenthood Funding

Indiana is poised to become the first state to cut all government funding for Planned Parenthood.

The move would be a significant victory for anti-abortion activists but could pose a political predicament for Republican Gov. Mitch Daniels as he considers running for president.

The Indiana House voted 66-32 Wednesday to cut off the $3 million in federal money the state distributes to the organization for family planning and health programs. The Senate approved the measure earlier this month.

Indiana risks losing $4 million in federal family planning grants if Daniels signs the bill.

A veto could antagonize ardent conservatives wary of Daniels' calls for a truce on "social issues" to focus on the economy. But signing the bill also could provide the political cover he needs from critical social conservatives.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - April 27, 2011

Champaign County Board Members Discuss Compensation Issue

Champaign County Board members haven't had a raise in more than 20 years.

And based on a straw poll conducted Tuesday night, a majority of them don't want to change the method they're paid, earning a specific per diem per meeting plus mileage, rather than an annual salary. But the amount of that per diem has yet to be set. It's currently $45, an amount some call woefully short. Urbana Democrat Tom Betz said it's kept some people from serving.

"It costs them more in the evening to pay the babysitter than they're getting in the per diem," he said. "It has really happened. I know one very good board member we lost because of that. No entity goes 25 years without any salary increase. It's really kind of ludicrous."

Champaign Democrat Michael Richards agrees, saying his party has trouble recruiting candidates with the current level of compensation, but Mahomet Republican John Jay said a raise can't be justified after the sacrifices county employees have made.

"So I'm hoping that we don't raise it at this time..," he said. "..In due respect to our employees, and to the taxpayers of this county, until we get our county back into some kind of reasonable fiscal shape."

Urbana Republican Steve Moser said money was never an incentive for him to serve on the county board, saying it's no different from serving on a school board.

County Administrator Deb Busey suggests the board set compensation rates every 10 years, and prior to a change in county board structure. It's expected to have 22 members instead of the current 27 after the 2012 elections. Voters recommended the change in an advisory referendum last fall.

The rates for board members don't have to be set until about six months before a new county board is sworn in, but county board chair Pius Wiebel said he'd hope to do it much sooner.

In another straw poll, the County Board also rejected a suggestion that the title of county board chair become an elected member of the county rather than one chosen by county board members.

Categories: Economics, Government, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - April 25, 2011

UI Faculty Senate Votes to Keep Institute of Aviation

UI Faculty Senate Votes to Keep Institute of Aviation

In a narrow 57-to-54 vote, members of the University of Illinois' Faculty Senate rejected a proposal Monday to close the Institute of Aviation located at Willard Airport in Savoy.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 25, 2011

Teacher Merit Pay Bill Heads to Gov. Daniels’ Desk

A bill linking teacher pay with student performance has won final legislative approval and now heads to Gov. Mitch Daniels for his signature.

The Senate voted 36-13 for the merit pay bill, which is part of Daniels' expansive education agenda. Under the bill, teachers would be evaluated annually. Only those in the top two of four categories would be eligible for certain pay raises. Local districts would create their own evaluations, but would have to include objective measures of student achievement, such as test scores.

Districts wouldn't be able to place a student for two years in a row with teachers rated in the lowest category without notifying parents.

Supporters say it's right to reward the best teachers, while opponents say teachers aren't in the profession for the money.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 22, 2011

Indiana Lawmakers Restrict Collective Bargaining for Teachers; Vouchers

Indiana Republicans have made two big gains in education policy. On Thursday a majority of the Indiana Senate approved what could become one of the most expansive school voucher programs in the nation. That comes just a day after the governor signed a new law that restricts collective bargaining for public school teachers.

Republican Gov. Mitch Daniels visited Valparaiso Thursday to tout the momentum he and the Republican-controlled legislature have seen for their education agenda.

Speaking on the collective bargaining issue, Daniels deflected criticism of being anti-union. He said, under the new legislation, teachers still have the right to bargain over salaries and benefits; they are only losing out on bargaining over things that have nothing to do with educating children. He cited things like like the color of paint inside teachers' lounges or the temperature inside of a school.

"This is the year we really transform Indiana for the better. I'm really very grateful for what the General Assembly has agreed to help us do," Daniels said before the Valparaiso Chamber of Commerce at Strongbow Inn. "Now, we have to go and make that system work."

The restrictions on teachers' collective bargaining take effect July 1.

Republican lawmakers are expected to enact more changes in education before the end of the legislation session, which ends next week. Several include changes Daniels laid out in his State of the State address in January.

Next on the list is the school voucher expansion, which the Senate approved Thursday. It could be taken up again by the Indiana House next week. The measure would allow some parents to use public money to send their children to a private school.

"Choice will no longer be limited to the well-to-do in our state. If you're a moderate or low income family and you've tried the public schools for at least a year and you can't find one that works for your child, you can direct the dollars we were going to spend on your child to the non-government school of your choice," Daniels said during his visit to Valparaiso. "That's a social justice issue to me."

Opponents worry vouchers would siphon money from public schools. The voucher issue is contentious; so much so that House Democrats referenced it when they bolted from the statehouse last month.

Another item in Daniels school overhaul initiative would impose a merit pay system on teachers. If it passes, the provision would tie raises in teacher salary to annual evaluations. Unions say that system could short-change teachers who work with students who are tough to teach.

Categories: Economics, Government, Politics

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