Illinois Public Media News

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - October 28, 2011

Champaign, Ford County Regional Supt Hopeful for Funding Measure

If legislation to use local funds for the salaries of Illinois' regional school superintendents can pass it two weeks, one of those officials says it should be enough.

Jane Quinlan is the superintendent for Champaign and Ford Counties. She says it's a little hard to tell what the overall amount in personal property replacement tax will be, but Quinlan says anticipated Department of Revenue figures for Fiscal 2012 appear to be slightly better than last year, and would cover areas vetoed by Governor Pat Quinn. The bill failed Thursday by four votes, but is expected to come up for another vote in two weeks.

Quinlan says she holds out hope for this measure.

"We do have funding to pay for the staff that provides the services and programs that we have," she said. "I think the question is out there about 'how do those services (function) without the regional superintendent, who has the authority to execute those?"

If the bill doesn't pass when lawmakers return to Springfield November 8th, Quinlan says each regional superintendent and their assistant will have to take a hard look at their options, which may include retirement. She says it's unrealistic for these officials to work a few months more without pay.

Quinn eliminated the money for the superintendents and their assistants in July because he says the state can't afford the $11 million.

State Senator Shane Cultra says the bill that failed Thursday is likely the only one that will be considered on this issue when legislators return to Springfield. The Onarga Republican says he's all for restoring these salaries, but not with the personal property replacement tax. The measure needed 71 votes to pass, but failed 59-to-55 in the House.

Cultra says this issue lies in the hands of Democratic House Speaker Mike Madigan, who isn't directly impacted, since Cook County has no regional superintendents.

"He's basically letting us fight over how we're going to pay them, and who we're going to take the money from" said Cultra. "Somebody's going to get hurt. Is it the superintendents, or is it going to be local units of government? So I don't like that discussion. I don't think it should be that way. But unfortunately, that's what we're stuck with."

Cultra says lawmakers should have been allowed to override Governor Pat Quinn's veto of those salaries, and take the funds out of general state revenue. The bill that failed was put on 'postponed consideration', meaning the sponsor can drum up support before bringing it up for another vote. The fall veto session continues November 8th.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - October 27, 2011

Ill. Commission Votes to Block Facility Closures

A bipartisan legislative commission is rejecting Gov. Pat Quinn's proposal to close three social-service facilities and a youth prison.

The Commission on Government Forecasting and Accountability cast advisory votes Thursday against closing a juvenile detention center in Murphysboro, a developmental center in Dixon and mental health hospitals in Rockford and Chester.

Quinn announced last month he needs to close seven facilities and lay off nearly 2,000 employees because of budget shortfalls.

A spokeswoman says Quinn has no choice but to shut the facilities unless the Legislature appropriates more money.

The American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees opposes the closures. Executive Director Henry Bayer says the votes indicate lawmakers believe the facilities are necessary. The commission has yet to vote on closing facilities in Lincoln, Jacksonville and Tinley Park.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - October 26, 2011

Ill. Senate Examines Quinn Gambling Ideas

The Illinois Senate is moving toward action on a gambling expansion based on Gov. Pat Quinn's recommendations.

Lawmakers passed a major expansion plan earlier this year, but Quinn says he'll veto it.

He wants a plan that creates five new casinos, including one in Chicago, but does not allow slot machines at race tracks.

A Senate committee debated the proposal today. A vote by the full Senate could come later in the day.

If the measure fails, it would help lawmakers argue that only the larger expansion can draw enough support to pass. That might build a veto-proof majority for expansion.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - October 25, 2011

Urbana Council Scraps CVB Funding

The city of Urbana's community development staff will work up a convention and tourism promotion campaign in conjunction with the Urbana Business Association.

A plan to fund Champaign County's Convention and Visitors Bureau at a much lower level failed to receive the necessary votes in last night's committee of the whole meeting to move forward.

The plan to give the CVB $18,800 needed six votes, but only received five. Alderwoman Heather Stevenson was absent. Opponents include Alderman Eric Jakobsson, who raised concerns with the lack of information and links on the Bureau's website. Mayor Laurel Prussing still contends the CVB still hadn't proved it was providing a return on the city's $72,000 investment.

"They're operating in a market that is completely dominated by the University of Illinois, and what they do isn't going to make one difference one way or the other," Stevenson said. "The major thing is people come here for a football game, a basketball game, for (the U of I's) Krannert Center. What CVB says on their website or doesn't say on their website isn't going to make any difference to that."

The original amount for the CVB was vetoed by the mayor, and the city council failed to override that veto in July. Community development staff is expected to prepare a report in the coming weeks.

Alderman Dennis Roberts questioned how those employees can take on such duties, and stay apprised of local events. Alderman Brandon Bowersox-Johnson argued that it only made sense to market businesses and special events on a regional basis.

"It doesn't make sense for our staff here in community development to be promoting a couple of things on our side of the line, but for us not to be able to tell people to go see Hardee's Reindeer Ranch or to go tour the (U of I's) supercomputer or to see other amazing things in Champaign County," Bowersox-Johnson said. "So ultimately if we all try to do our own little piece of this puzzle, I don't think we'll market Champaign County as well."

But since Urbana will forgo CVB funding for the time being, Bowersox said the city owes it to local businesses and shops to do a good job.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - October 24, 2011

Quinn Appoints Illinois Transportation Secretary

Gov. Pat Quinn has appointed a new leader for the Illinois Department of Transportation.

Quinn on Monday named Ann Schneider to be secretary of the state transportation department. Schneider has been acting secretary since July and previously was chief of operations for the department. Schneider also was chief fiscal officer for the Illinois Department of Natural Resources and in the Governor's Office of Management and Budget.

The governor also named John Holton as director of the Illinois Department on Aging.

Quinn also made other appointments, including Jim Larkin as acting director of the Department of Agriculture, Andrew Stolfi as acting director of the Illinois Department of Insurance and John Kim as interim director of the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - October 24, 2011

Indianapolis Schools Chief Demands Charter Investigation

The Indianapolis Public Schools superintendent wants the state to investigate charter schools that he claims break federal and state laws by turning away homeless and disabled students.

IPS Superintendent Eugene White wrote Superintendent of Public Instruction Tony Bennett Monday requesting the investigation into enrollment practices at all charter schools operating within its district boundaries and at 10 schools in particular. He says six schools have threatened to expel students only to give parents the option of withdrawing students to avoid expulsion.

White says 72 students have returned to IPS since the September count date that determines state funding while 27 students have left IPS for charter schools.

Indiana Department of Education spokesman Alex Damron says the state will carefully review documents on the charter schools' enrollment practices provided by IPS.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - October 24, 2011

Lawmakers Return to Springfield for Fall Veto Session

From pension reform to pregnant prisoners, lawmakers returning to Springfield face a packed agenda. Since adjourning in the spring, state legislators have been on standby while Gov. Pat Quinn took his turn.

Quinn used his veto power to alter, cut and outright dismiss measures ranging from the state budget to college scholarships. Now the focus is back on the General Assembly, which returns to the capitol on Tuesday for the fall veto session.

Legislators say they expect to vote on a gambling expansion bill, again, after Gov. Pat Quinn rejected several pillars of the plan they sent him in May. Quinn said he can accept new casinos in Danville, Chicago, two suburban towns, and Rockford. But he is drawing the line at allowing slot machines at racetracks, airports and other locations.

"We have no interest in becoming the Las Vegas of the Midwest," Quinn said during a press conference last week. "We have to maintain our culture (and) our character."

That opposition may jeopardize the entire package. Quinn is betting there will be a lot of negotiations and variations of gambling proposals during the veto session.

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel has said he hopes lawmakers and the governor can find common ground. Otherwise, a casino for Chicago, which the mayor wants to help ease budget constraints, could be placed on the back burner after finally getting through both chambers for the first time in more than a decade.

The day before he was sworn into office, Gov. Quinn wiped out state money that funds the salaries of regional superintendent. Quinn says regional superintendents are not the state's responsibility, but fall in the hands of local governments.

It will be up to legislators to decide if they will let Quinn's vetoes stand, or if they want to overrule the governor. Those in the offices who continue to work are responsible for things like inspecting school buildings, and certifying teachers and bus drivers, tasks that could have prevented schools from opening if they weren't done.

County regional school superintendents hope to get paid. Thomas Campbell considers himself a patient person. But after going without pay nearly four months, Campbell turned in his letter of resignation as Christian and Montgomery County's Regional Superintendent. He hasn't got a paycheck since he began the job July 1.

"We are elected just like the governor's an elected official, and to suddenly without discussion without sitting down across the table without any type of democratic approach to resolving any issues, we just got lined out of the budget and put out there in no man's land," Campbell said. "I just think it did show a great deal of disrespect. I think it has brought on a lot of disillusionment and disenchantment with what i call common sense governance."

Quinn eliminated their salaries from the budget in May, but support has emerged for a plan to pay them out of local tax dollars.

State support for school transportation was also reduced by Quinn. He also wants to delay how much hospitals get for taking care of Medicaid patients.

While some legislators want to keep overall spending down, others say it's clear the budget legislators approved in the spring doesn't provide enough funds.

Quinn wants to save money by closing a handful of state facilities, including a juvenile prison in Murphysboro, a medium security prison in Lincoln, mental health centers in Chester, Tinley Park and Rockford. Developmental centers in Jacksonville and Dixon would also be affected, and 1,900 state workers could be laid off. Unions and the communities that host those facilities are fighting the proposed shutdowns.

A legislative commission will continue holding hearings this week, and it will begin issuing advisory opinions about the future of these facilities.

Also set for a committee hearing is a bill to prohibit the Department of Corrections from shackling prisoners while they are giving birth. The bill arose after national news stories highlighted that restraints were being used on women during labor.

Look out for another controversial measure too, which pits the governor and consumer advocates against literal powerhouses ComEd and Ameren. Lawmakers narrowly passed a plan that would allow the utilities to raise monthly bills to pay for a modernized power grid. Quinn vetoed it. ComEd CEO Anne Prammagiore argues it's needed.

"A modern grid, while requiring an investment on the front end, would deliver multiple layers of economic benefits over the long run," Prammagiore said. "These benefits are real, and they've been enhanced."

But the Paul Gainer with the Attorney General's office said it's bad for electric customers' wallets.

"ComEd and Ameren have set the bar so low on the performance metrics that they know they will have absolutely no problem meeting those metrics, and getting exactly what they want - certainty, rate hikes, double digit profits," Gainer said.

It's unknown if the utilities have the clout to win over enough legislators to get their plan into law.

Also unclear is the fate of a legislative scholarship program the governor wants abolished. Many legislators want to keep their ability to hand out tuition waivers to students in their districts. But the program has been a magnet for scandal through the years, after some officials awarded the scholarships to campaign contributors' children.

Finally, public employees are on guard. They are concerned about the possible resurgence of a plan to reduce their future retirement benefits. Several bills are expected to move through committees that would eliminate a loophole in pensions for leaders of organized labor, along with revamping the pension boards that oversee systems for city of Chicago and Cook County employees. It is likely legislators will respond to stories about Chicago union leaders receiving both city and union pensions, a practice known as double dipping.

The veto session will run for six days, split over several weeks.

(AP Photo/Seth Perlman, File)


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - October 20, 2011

Danville Explores Plans to Increase Revenue

The city of Danville is exploring different opportunities to boost revenue.

On Wednesday night, the Public Safety Revenue Committee discussed a five-cent public safety tax that's expected to generate around $170,000. Committee co-chair Nancy O'Kane said that money would be used to strengthen Danville's police and fire departments.

"We're not looking to just go out there and just raise taxes to be raising taxes nor are we looking to give those police officers and those firefighter's raises," O'Kane said. "We're trying to put more officers on the street and more firefighters to protect our city."

O'Kane, who is a former Danville alderwoman, said she hopes the full council votes on the measure by December.

Meanwhile, Alderman Michael Puhr said whatever course the council takes, it will first survey the public to find out if they would support a new tax.

"You know, in these economic times we do have to watch what we do," Puhr said. "A lot of people in our community are on fixed incomes, but we still have to operate in a positive cash-flow in city government, as well."

Earlier this week, the city council narrowly voted down a measure that would have raised Danville's garbage pickup fee. Puhr said the council will likely consider a revised version of that plan. He said the Public Safety Revenue Committee is also exploring the prospect of charging extra for its public safety services in communities outside of Danville, and impounding vehicles of drivers who are caught under the influence of alcohol or in possession of marijuana.

Categories: Business, Economics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - October 20, 2011

U of Ill. Sports Gets $900,000 a Year in Waivers

The University of Illinois provides more than $900,000 a year in tuition waivers to cover scholarships for athletes and will continue to provide such support despite a committee's recommendation that the practice stop.

The Chicago Tribune (http://trib.in/pZkqNv ) reports that the university has provided the money from its general fund since the 1970s. A campus committee recommended that the waivers be phased out over five years as the university looks for ways to save money. They will instead be reduced.

Associate Chancellor Bill Adams was a member of the committee. He says the school's sports programs would have trouble making up the money if it was eliminated.

The waivers began in the 1970s as a way to support women's sports. Among Big Ten schools, only Wisconsin has a similar arrangement.

Categories: Economics, Education, Sports

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - October 19, 2011

Unpaid Ill. Regional School Superintendent Resigns

A central Illinois regional school superintendent has announced his resignation after going without pay for 14 weeks.

Christian and Montgomery County Regional Superintendent of Schools Tom Campbell on Wednesday told the Breeze-Courier (http://bit.ly/keaUC6) in Taylorville he can't continue. Campbell blames "political decisions made by our governor" for taking "a tremendous toll" on his ability to "stay positive and focused on remaining in office."

In July, Gov. Pat Quinn cut off pay to superintendents and their assistants. He says the state can't afford to pay the salaries. Quinn wants local governments to pay the salaries, but made no arrangements before vetoing the money.

Campbell says the decisions by state leaders show "total disrespect" for those who work in regional education offices in Illinois.

Taylorville is about 25 miles southeast of Springfield.


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