Illinois Public Media News

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - March 14, 2011

U of I Japan House Announces Earthquake Relief Fund

A fund-raising effort has begun at the University of Illinois Urbana campus to help victims of the earthquake and tsunami in Japan.

The university's Japan House, together with the College of Fine and Applied Arts, have launched Illinois Japan Disaster Relief Fund through the University of Illinois Foundation.

Japan House director and Associate Professor of Japanese Art and Culture, Kimiko Gunji, said friends in Japan that she has been able to contact tell her they are all right, following last week's earthquake. But Gunji said she hasn't yet reached anybody in Sendei, one of the areas hardest hit by the quake, and Gunji said her friends in Japan tell her that the earthquake's impact is evident, even in parts of the country relatively unscathed.

Speaking of a friend who lived on the outskirts of Tokyo, Gunji said, "She said her condo shook (for a) long time, and all her china was all broken into pieces. And another friend who lived in Tokyo, told me that when she went to pick up her husband, it took her ten hours, just for the short distance, couldn't move."

Gunji said periodic, severe earthquakes are a fact of life in Japan, once that people prepare for: "especially people living in (the) Tokyo area. My sister lived in the outskirts of Tokyo. Always she had a whole bunch of --- stuff. If something happened, (this) is the stuff that's prepared. Water, and things like that."

But Gunji said last week's quake and tsunami were especially devastating.

Gunji said the private donations sent in for the Illinois Japan Disaster Relief Fund will go directly to support the people of Japan. She said they plan to work with the Japanese Consul General in Chicago, and the Illini Japan Club --- an association of U of I alumni in Japan --- to determine how best to spend the donations.

The College of Fine and Applied Arts has set up a web page for donations to the Illinois Japan Disaster Relief Fund. Donations can also be mailed directly to Japan House or the University of Illinois Foundation. Checks should be made out to UIF/Illinois-Japan Disaster Relief.

Illinois-Japan Disaster Relief Japan House 2000 South Lincoln Avenue-Urbana, Illinois 61802 Phone: 217.244.9934- Email: japanhouse@illinois.edu

University of Illinois Foundation 1305 West Green Street Urbana, IL 61801-2962 Phone: 217.333.0810 Email: uif@uif.uillinois.edu

Prof. Gunji will dedicate a traditional tea ceremony to victims of the recent earthquake and tsunami this weekend. The event is scheduled for Saturday, March 19th at 1 PM at the U of I Japan House, at 2000 S. Lincoln in Urbana. The public is invited, and donations to the relief fund will be accepted at that time.

Categories: Community, Education

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - March 14, 2011

UI Board of Trustees Chair Discusses Economic Importance of University Research

University of Illinois board of trustees chair Christopher Kennedy addresses the U of I community in the Beckman auditorium to discuss the importance of research at the university to the economic development of Illinois and the nation. He explains why advancing efforts to secure new research opportunities will have a positive effect on the economy.

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AP - Illinois Public Media News - March 13, 2011

Illinois Prepares to Face Former Coach Kruger

Illinois coach Bruce Weber sat at a card table surrounded by reporters Sunday night, getting to know UNLV, the team his Illini will face in the NCAA tournament, as best he could with nothing more than a roster and rundown of wins and losses to work with.

The one thing Weber and the rest of the Illini know for sure, the eighth-seeded Rebels (24-8) are coached by one of the two main men Illini fans sometimes compare Weber to, Lon Kruger.

And if the ninth-seeded Illini (19-13) can get by UNLV Friday in Tulsa, Okla., they might well face the other one, the man Weber replaced, Kansas coach Bill Self.

All of that mattered little Sunday to an Illinois team just relieved to be in the NCAAs for the first time in two years. A year ago, they were stunned by an NCAA snub and trying to muster some enthusiasm for the NIT.

"After what I experienced last year, you never know," said senior Bill Cole, who pointed out that Illinois had to wait for two of the tournament's four regions to be filled before learning it was in. "When the first two regions go by, you're just begging to hear your name called."

The Illini were shocked to be left out of the NCAAs last year, their second tourney miss in three seasons.

And their last trip two years ago, as a No. 5 seed, ended with a first-round upset loss to 12th-seed Western Kentucky, a game that still leaves a bad taste for Illinois' four starting seniors: Cole, Demetri McCamey, Mike Tisdale and Mike Davis.

That 76-72 loss, Davis said Sunday, should hold a lesson for the Illini: Cliche or not, take the tournament one game at a time.

"Back then we saw Western Kentucky and we thought "Aw, we're gonna' win this one,'" he said.

The Illini aren't exactly riding a high as they get ready for UNLV, either.

They lost 60-55 to Michigan in their opener at the Big Ten tournament on Friday after leading by as many as 12 points.

That loss was reminiscent of a string of disappointing and often close losses for Illinois. The Illini opened the season ranked No. 13 and considered a contender for the Big Ten title. They finished in a tie for fourth.

UNLV spent four weeks in the Top 25, but dropped out for good after an up-and-down start in the conference.

The Rebels finished third in the Mountain West and won their last five regular-season games. They knocked off Wisconsin and Kansas State early but lost twice each to the elite of their conference, San Diego State and BYU.

Kruger coached the Illini for four seasons, leaving after the 1999-2000 season to become head coach of the Atlanta Hawks. He took over at UNLV in 2004.

Kruger's Illini went to the NCAA tournament three times in four years, won a Big Ten title in 1997-98 and finished in the Top 25 three times.

At UNLV, he's had similar success, coaching four of his seven teams to the NCAAs, including four of the last five.

The Rebels are led by Tre'Von Willis, who averages 13.5 points a game, and Chace Stanback, who averages 13 points a game and six rebounds.

Sunday night, Weber said he knew Kruger fairly well and faced him while an assistant at Purdue.

"He's a very, very good coach and that team will be well coached and play hard," Weber said.

Beyond that, he said he didn't know yet just what to expect beyond the likelihood that a smaller UNLV team was likely to press and trap.

McCamey said the Illini will need to rely on good defense to counter that strategy.

"If you get stops and get out in transition, they can't press you," McCamey said.

Weber declined to look ahead at a potential matchup with Self and the Southwest top-seed Jayhawks. Kansas opens with Boston University, a 16 seed.

Some fans on Internet message boards and elsewhere over the past couple of seasons have compared Weber unfavorably to Self, sometimes saying Weber's best year, the 2005 run to the NCAA final, was built on players Self recruited.

Tisdale said, while he's focused on UNLV, the idea of beating at least one of his coach's predecessors would add a little extra incentive.

"Everybody's going to be talking about Kansas and Illinois and all this stuff, but our focus right now is UNLV," the 7-foot-1 center said. "We're going to do what we can to win one for our coach.

Categories: Education, Sports

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - March 11, 2011

Unions, Faculty, Students Rally at UI For Workers’ Rights

University of Illinois students, faculty, and local high school students stepped away from the classroom to speak out on behalf of public employees in Wisconsin, Indiana, and other states.

About 250 carried signs on the Urbana campus quad to show their solidarity for collective bargaining rights and public education. Library and Information Science professor Susan Davis of the U of I's Campus Faculty Association said the events in Wisconsin this week were an attack on the right of people to act collectively to define their own interests.

"So for weeks, the Republicans framed their attack on the unions as a purely fiscal issue," she told the crowd. "But on Wednesday night, they admitted that the motive was not the budget. It was collective bargaining all along. It wasn't about money, it was about power."

Davis' words were met with cheers. Two University Laboratory High School students that play on the girls' soccer team say they're being threatened with a suspension and missing their first game. They say threats of those consequences kept about 30 of their classmates from attending. About five other students from Urbana High School attended the rally as well, including junior Julian Threlkeld.

"Unions workers work really hard at their jobs," Threlkeld said. "They deserve the rights. They deserve the priveleges. And the fact that the movement of collective bargaining has been taken away from them is totally wrong in my opinion."

Threkeld says he might get a detention because of his leaving school early, but says the cause was worth it. The majority of the crowd consisted of U of I students. The rally was led by the Graduate Employees Organization.

Categories: Education, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - March 11, 2011

U of I Earthquake Researchers Headed to Japan

A team of researchers from the University of Illinois will be going to Japan next week to survey the devastation caused by Friday's magnitude 8.9 earthquake and tsunami.

Doctoral candidate Hussam Mahmoud with the U of I's Mid-America Earthquake Center said one thing to learn from the world's 5th largest earthquake since 1900 will be how to better retrofit buildings. He said damage to newer structures will reveal flaws in design codes. But Mahmoud said Japan had already improved from prior designs, learning from the 1995 magnitude 7.2 quake near the city of Kobe that claimed more than 6,000 lives.

"Then we can see exactly what are the weak points we have in all design codes," Mahmoud said. "And the design really are no different in any countries of the world. What they have in Japan for design and the codes that we also have here, there's a lot of dissemation of information, there might be slight differences, but we're pretty much doing the same thing."

But Mahmoud said the tsunami and many fires associated with this earthquake make it very hard to assess the total loss of life, damage, and economic impact.

He said the information coming from his team's research in Japan will be distributed to thousands of agencies worldwide studying seismic activity.

Categories: Education, Science

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - March 10, 2011

UI Graduate Workers Will See Relief From Payroll Glitch with Grant Money

Nearly 200 University of Illinois Urbana campus graduate workers affected by a payroll glitch can receive emergency grant money this semester.

U of I spokeswoman Robin Kaler said the university is temporarily raising the cap on that program, so anyone impacted will be able to recoup what they were losing by the university's failure to collect taxes on tuition waivers the last seven years.

Revised figures show about 170 grad assistants were impacted, but Kaler said only six are to receive no pay over the next three months. One hundred ten of them will see a pay reduction of 10-percent or less. Graduate Employees Organization spokesman Christopher Simeone said he is happy to see the U of I stepped up and took the blame.

"We felt from the beginning that although this is a series of accidents that this was ultimately the University's responsibility," Simeone said. "We felt that it was unjust to hand down the consequences of the mistakes unto least able to bear those consequences."

Kaler said the cap for emergency grants is being temporarily increased to $2,200 this semester, allowing to recoup what would have received over the next three months. Students are normally limited to $500 a semester through the grants.

Kaler said there are other situations in which others students would apply for the grants.

"You do not have to be a GA or a PGA to apply for this program," she said. "If for example, you have a job on campus and you also have a job in the community somewhere and you've lost your job, you would be a candidate to apply for this."

Grant forms are being made available in the next couple of days, with the money expected with seven to 10 days. When the payroll error was discovered, some graduate workers indicated they would have to withdraw from school. Simeone said he can't verify that anyone did, but says members of the GEO were 'very scared'.

He said the union is still concerned about future problems regarding tax withholdings, and is working with the U of I to help plan members' budgets. He said the GEO is also trying to contact US Senator Dick Durbin's office about potential revisions to federal tax law.

Categories: Education, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - March 09, 2011

Illini Coach: Surely We’ll Make NCAAs

Heading into the Big Ten tournament, Illinois coach Bruce Weber has questions.

Will Jereme Richmond's banged-up shoulder hold up? Can he count on slumping guards D.J. Richardson and Brandon Paul for at least tough defense in Friday's game against Michigan? Will Demetri McCamey's solid form of the past few weeks last?

But Weber figures, surely, there's at least one thing he doesn't have to question -- what happens to Illinois (19-12, 9-9 Big Ten) after the conference tournament is done.

If Illinois isn't in the NCAA tournament, "I would be dumbfounded, to be honest," Weber said, counting off the tough non-conference opponents the Illini faced this season -- Texas, Maryland, North Carolina and Gonzaga among them. Illinois beat the last three and took Texas to overtime.

Then again, the Illini were stunned a year ago when they were left out of the NCAA tournament for the second time in three seasons. Their record then (19-14, 10-8) was even a little better as far as conference play goes.

This season, Weber said, the Illini went through a tougher schedule with last year's snub in mind.

If games against Texas, North Carolina and the rest don't get the Illini into an expanded tourney that now includes 68 teams, "I will totally change my mindset of scheduling philosophy, I promise that," he said.

Illinois has rebounded in recent weeks from a midseason slump that saw them slide out of the Top 25 and into the middle of the Big Ten pack. McCamey's game in particular fell off and losses to Indiana, Penn State and Northwestern piled up like failing grades on the Illini report card.

Since then, the Illini sandwiched wins over the Hoosiers and Iowa around a close road loss to Purdue.

The team that won those games, Weber said, looked a lot more like the one that handled North Carolina than the one that couldn't buy a key basket when it needed one at Indiana.

"We had the puzzle pretty well put together early; it got messed up," Weber said. "Now we're putting those pieces back into the puzzle."

The biggest piece of that puzzle is McCamey..

The senior guard, even with his midseason slump, is Illinois' leading scorer with 15 points a game. And no one on the roster can run the offense the way McCamey can -- his 6.1 assists a game are second in the conference, behind the Wolverines' Darius Morris.

McCamey traces his problems -- and his team's -- to a tentative streak he believes is behind them.

"I think I've just got to be aggressive," he said, adding that the Illini were often slow to get into transition during their slump. "We are a real dangerous team when we get out in transition."

Weber said his other questions still need to be answered.

Richmond, the first player off the bench for Illinois, is playing with pain in his injured shoulder but will have to be a factor for the Illini if they're going to get past Michigan (19-12, 9-9).

Paul and Richmond, Weber said, could be important, too. Paul is one of Illinois' only options for spelling McCamey -- and when he's on, the sophomore guard can be a dangerous shooter. Richardson, meanwhile, will likely have a lot of the defensive responsibility for Morris.

"Morris is kind of the head of the group," Weber said. "A Steve Nash-like player that wheels and deals and sets up everyone else.

Categories: Education, Sports

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - March 09, 2011

U of I Student Wins Inventors’ Prize For Auto-Gear Wheelchair

A University of Illinois graduate student who developed an automatic gear shifting mechanism for manual wheelchairs is this year's winner of the Lemelson-MIT Illinois Student Prize. Mechanical engineering student Scott Daigle was to formally received the $30,000 prize at a ceremony Wednesday evening on the Urbana campus.

Daigle said his invention helps users of manual wheelchairs who risk chronic shoulder pain and even injury, from constantly pushing the back wheels of a wheelchair. He compares his "IntelliWheels" gearshift to the gearshift that a bicyclist uses to handle different terrains and speeds.

"The IntelliWheels system achieves that same goal, by automatically sensing what the user is doing," Daigle said. "How hard they're pushing, how fast they're going, what kind of hill they're on, and intelligently selecting the best gear for the job."

But Daigle said the most important result of the IntelliWheels wheelchair is that it helps wheelchair users better maintain their independence.

"We're not asking them to rely on big heavy motors or big batteries," he said. "It's an easier way of keeping your mobility in a manual wheelchair."

Daigle said his IntelliWheels wheelchair is still in the testing stage. Meanwhile, he is also working on other devices for wheelchair users, such as an emergency toolkit and what he calls "castor-skis" to go on a wheelchair's front wheels to get around on snowy winter sidewalks.

Daigle is doing the research through his IntelliWheels comany, formed with partners that include U of I PhD. candidate student Marissa Siebel, the athletic trainer for the U of I wheelchair athletics team. The company operates out of the EnterpriseWorks Technology Business Incubator at the U of I Research Park in Champaign.

Daigle said he plans to invest his Lemelson-MIT prize money into IntelliWheels. The Lemelson-MIT Illinois Student Prize is one of four prizes in the Lemelson-MIT student program, which rewards outstanding work by student inventors.

Categories: Education, Technology


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - March 07, 2011

UI Student Hit by Multiple Vehicles Dies

A University of Illinois student who was struck by two vehicles over the weekend has died.

The Champaign County coroner's office said 21-year-old Bradley Bunte died late Monday morning - he had been in critical condition since late Friday night, when an eastbound van clipped him at University and McCullough in Urbana. Bunte was then run over by a second vehicle.

He was a Champaign native and a sports reporter for the Daily Illini.

(Photo courtesy of Facebook)

Categories: Education

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