Illinois Public Media News

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - February 25, 2011

Labor Talks Still On Between UI and SEIU, but Under an Unfair Labor Complaint

Talks this week between the University of Illinois and one of its employee unions gained no ground - and now the union is filing an unfair labor complaint.

But the head of the Service Employees International Union local said the two sides have agreed to have a federal mediator sit in on talks next month. Ricky Baldwin said that will head off any labor action for at least a month.

Baldwin claims U of I negotiators haven't been bargaining in good faith by asking for new concessions that moved negotiations further apart. He also accuses the University of replacing some union jobs with lower-paid workers, many of them students.

"It's not an us versus them in terms of the contingent workers," Baldwin said. "We love for these people to be hired full-time, get decent pay and benefits and union rights. But they're not treated very well," Baldwin claimed, saying employees were afraid to complain after one supervisor demonstrated bad behavior.

The SEIU represents nearly 800 food service and building service employees on the Urbana campus. A U of I spokesperson has not been available for comment as of Friday afternoon.

Baldwin said negotiations will resume March 8th, a week before a federal mediator will join the talks.

Categories: Economics, Education, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - February 23, 2011

Indiana Democratic House Members Seek Middle Ground During Meetings in Urbana

(Additional reporting from the Associated Press)

A Western Indiana Democrat says the caucus meet-up of House members in Urbana should be looked upon as a time out to reach some common ground.

Dale Grubb of Covington said there are other bills besides a contentious right-to-work legislation that spurred him and over 30 of his colleagues to leave the capitol Tuesday.

"The only opportunity a minority has for input is the quorum issue," he said. "And I'm staying at home, I'm trying to work with people and see how quickly we can find common ground on some of those issues - get down to the issues that are the real sticklers. You have to be talking in order to come to some conclusion."

Grub says there are a number of bills concerning public education that also prompted the move, including one that will allow tax dollars to fund private school tuition for some families.

"The one charge that we have as a General Assembly to pass a budget... and adequately fund public education," Grubb said. "We've only got so many dollars. I don't see how we can take money away from public schools and not hurt our kids."

And a House Democrat from Ft. Wayne says Republicans have a radical agenda that will mean lower salaries across Indiana. Win Moses is also staying at the hotel in Urbana. He says progress has made, since Governor Mitch Daniels has agreed the right-to-work legislation shouldn't be taken up at this time. But Moses says the measure is scattered in several bills, and Democrats need to know for sure it's off the table. He says his party expected to forward more than 100 amendments to the capitol by Wednesday night, but Moses is not willing to predict how long Democrats will stay in Urbana.

""We have the agenda - the house bill list, and we're working on that," said Moses. "So we're prepared when we do go back. I don't know how long we'll be here, it depends on how negotiations go. If anybody predicts a day, the other side will probably use that to their advantage and try to push it a day longer."

Moses says Friday is the deadline for bills to pass out of the chamber they originated. But he says that won't have much of an impact, since half the legislative session is left.

Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels says Republicans will not be "bullied or blackmailed'' out of pursuing their agenda despite a boycott from House Democrats over contentious labor and education proposals. He told reporters Wednesday that Democrats will not keep him from pursuing his agenda even if it means calling special legislative sessions "from now to New Year's.''

Meanwhile, Indiana's Senate president says the House should have never taken up a contentious anti-labor bill that spurred the boycott by Democrats there, and he said the Senate won't push the issue this year. Senate President Pro Tem David Long said it was a "mistake'' for his fellow Republicans in the House to take up the issue. But he said it is water under the bridge now and he wants House Democrats to return to work.

Long said the Republican-ruled Senate won't push the"right-to-work'' bill that would prohibit union membership from being a condition of employment. Long said the Senate will instead propose a study committee to look into the matter over the summer. Most House Democrats are in Urbana, and their absence is preventing a quorum needed for House business.

(Photo by Jeff Bossert/WILL)

Categories: Economics, Education, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - February 23, 2011

Ind. House Democrats Make Urbana Their Home in Exile

The Democratic caucus of the Indiana House is holding court one state over.

Thirty-five state representatives left Indianapolis Tuesday. They're staying at a hotel in Urbana as they try to hold up bills they say would negatively impact organized labor and education.

Representative Craig Fry said they had few other options to block bills, including one that would prohibit union memberships or dues as a requirement for employment.

"It's been pretty obvious for about a week that we would have to do something pretty dramatic to make Republicans take notice," Fry said inside a conference room where the fugitive Democrats are holding caucus meetings. "Constitutionally this is all we can do, to deny quorum."

But Representative Charlie Brown said Democrats' anger goes beyond the so-called right-to-work bill. He said their walkout is also stalling bills to allow private-school vouchers and curtail collective bargaining rights for public-school teachers.

Indiana Governor Mitch Daniels has said he won't order state police to round up House Democrats, and he had asked Republican House leaders not to bring up the right-to-work legislation. He also told reporters yesterday in Indianapolis that he respected the Democrats' decision as part of the political process, though he wants them to return immediately to vote on the legislation, but Brown is skeptical.

"It's sometimes difficult to understand and appreciate whether the governor is playing good cop or bad cop," Brown said. "It would appear as though he's sincere, but then who knows for sure. I will leave that interpretation and judgment up to greater minds than mine, as to whether we should take him at his word."

Neither Brown nor Fry will say how long they expect to stay in Urbana. Brown said in a couple of days they may have less-weighty issues to deal with, like clean clothes. He is also not sure whether the delegation would have to leave the hotel if rooms are reserved for a future event in town, such as an Illini basketball game.

(Photo by Tom Rogers/WILL)

Categories: Education, Government, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - February 22, 2011

Rally on UI Campus in Support of Wisconsin Workers

As protesters flock Wisconsin's capitol in response to legislation to strip most public employees of bargaining rights, a group held its own rally on the University of Illinois campus.

About 125 people made up of university students and staff, and nearby residents stood in front of the Alma Mater statue chanting: "The workers united will never be defeated. The workers united will never be defeated. The workers united will never be defeated."

The Graduate Employees' Organization, a labor union representing 2,500 U of I teaching and graduate assistants, helped organize the event. Union member Stephanie Seawell said workers in Wisconsin and all across the country should be able to negotiate for better contracts, a right she criticizes Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker for trying to take away.

"That fundamental right is being challenged in Wisconsin, and if it can be challenged in Wisconsin, it can be challenged here," Seawell said. "Workers should join together and say this is enough."

At the close of the rally, participants marched to the YMCA on campus to hold a 24-hour-a-day vigil, which Seawell said will last until Governor Walker backs down from his proposal to eliminate collective bargaining rights for most of Wisconsin's public employees.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - February 17, 2011

Kids Count Study Shows Childhood Poverty on the Rise in Champaign County

Amid the highs and lows of Illinois' uncertain economy, a new report says Champaign County has followed a decade-long trend of increased childhood poverty.

The "Great at Eight" report, released by Voices for Illinois Children, focused on the resources children up until the age of eight need to succeed. The report's authors say at this age "children should be ready to shift from learning to read to reading to learn."

The study finds from 1999-2000, the childhood poverty rate in Champaign County was 14.3 percent, slightly below the statewide average of 14.8 percent. In 2008-2009, the county's child poverty rate went up to 18.9 percent, compared with 17.8 percent statewide.

Meanwhile, math and reading scores for 3rd graders on the Illinois Standards Achievement Test in Urbana and Champaign Schools last year were below the state average.

The authors of the report say the state fiscal crisis threatens an array of services, including early childhood education, mental health care, and family support. Beverley Baker, the director of Community Impact with the United Way of Champaign County, said she agrees that programs critical to a child's development are at risk, which is why she said state funding is making it more difficult to rely on Illinois for support.

"Each local community is going to have to look inward," she said. "There's no way we can replace what the state government does, but I think we're going to have to be creative, and we're going to have to pool our local resources to see what we can do."

The report acknowledges that there will likely be more spending cuts, as the recent income tax increase is not enough to close Illinois' budget gap.

In the last year, low-income students represented more than half of the enrollment at Champaign Unit 4 and Urbana School District 116. Unit 4 School board member Sue Gray said the school district is looking to trim up to $2 million from its $100 million budget, a task she said will not be taken lightly.

The School Board plans to hold a public meeting Tuesday, February 22 at 6pm at the Mellon Building in Champaign to seek community input on how to make those cuts.

(Graphic courtesy of Voices for Illinois Children)


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - February 17, 2011

Governor Pat Quinn Introduces New Budget Plan

Getting more revenue for the state was the main goal of Governor Pat Quinn's previous budget addresses. But this year, with a new income tax hike in effect, Quinn on Wednesday made no such pitch. The Governor mentioned a few new initiatives ... such as efforts to attract start-up companies to Illinois, and to double the state's exports. But the governor says the main focus of his proposed spending plan is exercising spending restraint. As Illinois Public Radio's Amanda Vinicky reports ... for some, the cuts Quinn has proposed don't go far enough. Others call them devastating.

(Photo courtesy of Chris Eaves)

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WILL - Illinois Public Media News - February 16, 2011

Pavement Collapse Forces Closure in Downtown Champaign

Part of Market Street in downtown Champaign was closed Wednesday morning, after the pavement collapsed.

The section of Market Street between Logan and Bailey runs past the Illinois Terminal Building, and is heavily traveled by both buses and motorists using the Terminal Building's parking lot.

City Operations Manager Tom Schuh said the collapse was due to the failure of the material packed underneath the street's original brick pavement. He said the collapsed produced a series of depressions in the street, cracking and displacing the asphalt surface.

Schuh said it will take until Friday for a crew to rebuild the roughly 50-foot section of Market Street. Until then, he says that section of Market Street is closed to all but parking lot traffic.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - February 16, 2011

Bookseller in Normal May Change Plans in Wake of Border’s Bankruptcy

The announced closure of the Border's store in Normal could change the approach of a locally owned bookstore. Sarah Lindenbaum manages Babbitt's books, located near Illinois State University.

She says her store, which sells solely used books, has been anticipating the Border's closing. Lindenbaum said her store buys a lot of trade paperbacks that customers have bought at Border's.

"Are people going to be bringing as many?," she said. "But again, there are still bookstores in Peoria, there's still Barnes and Noble in Bloomington. And another thing we've discussed as far as what would happen if Border's closes, and maybe even Barnes and Noble, is would we start to stock new books and try to capitalize on that."

Lindenbaum said if her store did sell new books, it would take more than a year before those sales could take place. She said Babbitt's took a dip with the recession, but has rebounded lately, and has retained all of its regular customers. And Lindenbaum said she thinks there will continue to be a market for modern first editions and collectable books.

Categories: Economics, Education

AP - Illinois Public Media News - February 16, 2011

Quinn Proposes Oft-defeated School Consolidation

Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn wants to increase public school spending slightly in the coming year. But he would save state money by consolidating schools and cutting spending on regional offices of education.

The Democrat outlined his budget proposal for the coming year Wednesday.

Elementary and secondary education spending would be up about 3 percent.

But the governor is proposing mergers to reduce the 868 school districts across the state - an emotional issue that has failed in the past.

Quinn also wants to cut $14 million the state spends on 45 regional education offices. He says the State Board of Education can take up their tasks.

And he would reduce state spending on bus transportation for students by $95 million. He says local school districts should shoulder that cost.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - February 16, 2011

Quinn Creating ‘Innovation Council’ to Create Jobs

Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn proposed a slight increase in education spending Wednesday but wants to save state money by pushing school consolidation and eliminating regional education offices, two ideas that have gone down in flames over the years.

Quinn resurrected the idea of consolidation, which has caused ll feelings since the days of the one-room schoolhouse, but didn't say how much might be saved.

His chief of staff, Jack Lavin, said he number of districts in Illinois -now 868 - "should be down significantly."

The Democratic governor also proposed cutting a $14 million subsidy to 45 regional offices of education, which conduct training and special schools, and reducing by $95 million the amount the state pays to bus students to the classroom.

Overall state support for elementary and secondary education would climb 3.2 percent to $7.2 billion, still 1 percent lower than in 2009-2010 school year.

Higher education would see just a slight increase in money, 1.2 percent to $2.15 billion.


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