Illinois Public Media News

AP - Illinois Public Media News - October 01, 2009

U of I Board Sets Saturday Meeting to Appoint Interim President

The University of Illinois Board of Trustees plans to appoint an interim president at a special meeting it's called for this Saturday on the Urbana campus. The meeting begins at 9 AM at the Illini Union.

The interim president would take over from B. Joseph White, who announced his resignation last week, in the wake of the U of I admissions scandal. The agenda doesn't give a name for the proposed interim president.

Former U of I president Stanley Ikenberry says he's been approached by some trustees about serving as interim president. He says he would accept the position if it were offered formally.

Trustees also plan to appoint an interim president designate. U of I spokesman Tom Hardy says that position would help ease the transition over to the interim president, before White's resignation takes effect, January 1st.

"It's likely that it would be the same person as the interim president", says Hardy.

The agenda for Saturday's board of trustees meeting also includes a motion to form a search committee to help find a permanent president. Trustees could also approve a revised employment agreement for President White, who plans to continue teaching and fundraising work at the Urbana campus.

Hardy calls the items on the quickly put-together agenda "probable". He says while trustees may choose not to act on some of them at that particular meeting, putting all of them on the agenda gives them some flexibility.

Categories: Education

AP - Illinois Public Media News - September 30, 2009

Champaign Unit 4 School Board Passes Deficit Budget

The Champaign School Board passed a deficit budget Tuesday night for the current school year. And while Unit Four officials say their cash reserves are enough to cover the loss, they warn of more serious deficits next year, unless some difficult cuts are made.

The 153 million dollar budget includes a nearly 3-point-9 million dollar deficit. Unit Four Chief Financial Officer Gene Logas says the district was the victim of unexpected cuts in state funding, changing rules for the use of federal stimulus funds, and tax revenues dampened by the recession.

"This is the most difficult budget I've had to put together in 22 years of public service", said Logas.

Still, Logas says the budget is not a total disaster. He says Unit 4 is avoiding large scale cuts, and should end the fiscal year with over 16 million dollars in its fund balance. Logas says that's still a healthy level for Unit 4. But he warns says the school district's finances will be even tighter next year, and planning must start soon for more cuts and the possible issuing of more working cash bonds.

The 153 million dollar budget includes a nearly 3-point-9 million dollar deficit. Unit Four Chief Financial Officer Gene Logas says the district was the victim of unexpected cuts in state funding, changing rules for the use of federal stimulus funds, and tax revenues dampened by the recession. The Champaign School Board is expected to start studying those options at its October 26th meeting.

The Unit 4 school board also approved a 3 percent raise for its administrative staff --- not including Superintendent Arthur Culver. Assistant Superintendent Beth Shepperd says the increase is lower than usual, because of the tight budget, and may have to go even lower next year.

Categories: Education

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - September 29, 2009

UI History Professor Recalls 1950’s Ouster of University President

Joseph White's announcement last week that he would resign as President of the University of Illinois is not the only time a president at the university was forced out of office. 56 years ago... the Board of Trustees pressured George Stoddard into stepping down as President after a 7-year tenure marked by controversy. AM 580's Jeff Bossert spoke with Professor Emeritus of History Winton Solberg on both the good and bad of Stoddard's tenure:

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Categories: Education, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - September 23, 2009

More on White Resignation and Upcoming U of I Decisions from Current and Former Trustees

A new member of the University of Illinois' Board of Trustees says talks could begin as soon as Thursday morning on seeking out an interim replacement for President B. Joseph White.

In Chicago, Karen Hasara and the two other members of the Ad Hoc Committee on University Personnel Matters are scheduled to meet Thursday for the first time. The former Springfield Mayor says initial discussions towards appointing that interim could be part of that meeting. Most of it is expected to take place in closed session.

Hasara says she respects White for stepping down, saying it was probably in the best interest of the university. But she's unsure yet about what the fate of Urbana Chancellor Richard Herman should be.

"We really haven't gotten into details of what to do about that", says Hasara. "We've gotten letters, quite a few letters in support of him, and of course, the faculty vote not in support. But that will be the next big decision, I believe --- besides an interim

Hasara says she still needs time to read up on all the reports on improper admissions at the U of I, and who was responsible for them. But she says it will be important to get all Trustees together to discuss the future of university leadership.

Meanwhile, David Dorris --- one of the trustees who resigned in the wake of the admissions scandal --- also commends White for deciding to step down. But Dorris says White was not an effective president, and a change was in order.

Dorris says that after contacts with other former trustees, he believes that a majority of them shared his view. He says they arrived at that conclusion, before the admissions scandal broke. "We just thought it was time for a change in direction for the University of Illinois" says Dorris, "because his leadership as the president had been ineffective, and we thought that we could do better."

Dorris accuses White of mishandling the Global Campus project, and events leading up to the retirement of Chief Illiniwek ---although he doesn't include the Chief's retirement itself as a count against him. Dorris also says that the administration under White circumvented the board's rehiring policy, meant to keep employees from collecting a U of I pension and working for the university at the same time. And he accuses White of keeping 30-million dollars off the university's books without telling the board --- money that suddenly appeared in time to pay skyrocketing utility bills.

Dorris was alarmed by Governor Pat Quinn's comments on a Chicago radio station Wednesday morning suggesting that a replacement for White might be named that very day. That's turned out not to be the case, but Dorris says he's concerned that Quinn might be trying to engineer what should be the board's choice of an interim and eventually a permanent president for the university. Quinn has said it will be up to the Board of Trustees to decide White's successor.

David Dorris was one of seven U of I trustees who resigned in the wake of the admissions scandal --- only one, Ed MacMillan, was reappointed by Quinn. Dorris says the next U of I president needs to be a genuinely excellent choice, with stronger academic credentials in place of White's business background.

Categories: Education, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - September 23, 2009

UI President Joseph White Confirms Resignation

University of Illinois President Joseph White has confirmed his resignation, effective December 31st, in a letter today to U of I Trustees Chair Chris Kennedy.

That date will end a nearly 5-year tenure that was tarnished by the university's admissions scandal involving politically-backed applicants. University Spokesman Tom Hardy says he expects U of I trustees to hold a special meeting to name an interim president prior to their regularly scheduled November 12th meeting in Springfield. He says that person would assume leadership in January, and along with the trustees, oversee a national search for a permanent replacement, who could be in place by fall of 2010.

But Hardy says White still plans on being heavily involved with the U of I in other areas. "He's grown very close to the university community at large, and Urbana," says White. "He intends to make his home in Urbana and to continue to work with the university in a variety of capacities, chief among them being teaching and fundraising." The 62-year old White came to the U of I in January 2005 from the University of Michigan, where he served as a faculty member and administrator. By stepping down early from a contract that was extended last year, he will forgo a $475,000 retention bonus that would have kicked in next February. His current contract would have expired on June 30, 2011.

More material regarding President White's resignation can be found at the link below.

Categories: Education, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - September 23, 2009

Quinn: UI President White to Resign

Illinois Governor Pat Quinn says he expects to receive the resignation of the University of Illinois' president today.

The governor made his remarks on a Chicago radio station and repeated them before a breakfast he attended in Chicago this morning. There's been no official response from White or the University. Joseph White has come under scrutiny from university faculty members and the public for his part in an admissions scandal. Earlier this year - the Chicago Tribune reported the university accepted unqualified students who had connections to political clout. White has served as president since 2005. Chris Kennedy chairs the university board of trustees. When asked at the same breakfast featuring the governor this morning, Kennedy wouldn't comment this morning on White's resignation. Nor would Urbana Chancellor Richard Herman when we contacted his office this morning.

Categories: Education, Government, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - September 22, 2009

UI Professor’s Innovations Make Him a MacArthur “Genius

If you hear about someone pursuing their wildest dreams with a monetary windfall, the first thing to come to mind might be a lottery winner. But as AM 580's Tom Rogers reports, the latest half-millionaire in Illinois has worked hard for the reward.

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Categories: Education, Health, Technology

AP - Illinois Public Media News - September 15, 2009

H1N1 Flu Continues a Swing through the UI Urbana Campus

More than 400 cases of suspected H1N1 flu have been reported on the University of Illinois' campus in Urbana-Champaign so far this semester and more are expected.

Dr. Robert Palinkas of the McKinley Health Center says most of the cases have been relatively mild.

University officials have been asking students with suspected cases of the illness to go home until they're no longer contagious or isolate themselves in their residences. Palinkas says most families of undergraduate students have been heeding that advice, as have many students living independently. "We do trust them to comply, and generally we get pretty good cooperation from an individual when they understand the public health aspect of this," Palinkas said.

Palinkas says students and others who suspect they have the flu should come to the university's health center. He also says they're standing by for word on an H1N1 flu vaccine, which he hopes to make available to students and others in October or November.

(help from The Associated Press)

Categories: Education, Health

AP - Illinois Public Media News - September 15, 2009

Consent Decree Hearing Reveals Resolve, Some Skepticism

What could be one of the final court hearings on the Champaign school district's consent decree is uncovering some doubt over a proposed settlement.

A federal judge invited written public comment on the proposal that would end seven years of court supervision over racial equity issues in Unit 4. On Tuesday, some of those commenters testified in person.

Before those people spoke, Champaign superintendent Arthur Culver answered a concern from Judge Joe Billy McDade that the public skepticism may stem from what happens in individual school - in other words, some staff may revert back to old habits or not share the same concern for equity.

I think it's clear that we're serous about this work," said Culver. "If our staff members aren't coming to work with the same vision and mission that we have set for this district, then there are consequences."

Part of the settlement includes a new committee to oversee future equity issues, such as alternative education or student assignment. Ardice James, with the National Council of African American Men worries that the Education Equity Excellence committee may not have any teeth.

"Who would this committee report to?" asked James. "I feel that this committee should report to the board and more or less be advisory. I also believe that any recommendation that this committee proposes, that the Board of Education should consider that recommendation very strongly."

But Carol Ashley, an attorney for the plaintiffs whose suit led to the consent decree, says that committee will be guided by a third party. It's not known when Judge McDade will decide to accept or deny the settlement.

The hearing was a rare event for a federal court in central Illinois. After initially ruling that television crews could videotape the courtroom hearing -- a rarity in the federal court system -- Judge Mc Dade responded to complaints from radio newspaper reporters and opened recording to all media. McDade told reporters before the hearing that he had made a mistake in believing he was approving one station's request to broadcast the entire hearing live, and he opened the hearing up to all recording devices out of fairness.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - September 15, 2009

U of I Urbana Academic Senate Passes Resolution Calling on Pres. White & Chancellor Herman to Go

Because of the admissions scandal, the president and Urbana campus chancellor at the University of Illinois should go ---- once "new leadership" is in place. That's the main advice to the Board of Trustees, offered in a non-binding resolution passed by the Academic Senate at the Urbana campus in a special meeting Monday.

The vote was 98 to 55, after Senators heard from president Joseph White and Chancellor Richard Herman, the two administrators named in the resolution.

White says he had no direct role in the admissions scandal, and had often fought to protect the university against political pressures from the Blagojevich administration. "The notion that I would submit to pressure or apply pressure for admissions or anything else in order to please the high and mighty is dead wrong", he told the Senate.

Herman admitted making mistakes in the admissions process, but asked for a second chance. "Give me the opportunity", he asked the Senate, "to convince you, the Board of Trustees and the public, that my body of work is worthy enough to consider that I be given the opportunity to continue in our cause. Every day, our future accomplishments will be my atonement."

But the resolution says that in addition to admissions reform, the Board of Trustees must hold White and Herman accountable to save the U of I's reputation. Political Science Professor Paul Diehl does not serve on the Academic Senate, but argued for the resolution at the special meeting. Diehl cited instances of intervention in the admissions process in support of a relative, direct orders to admit individuals over faculty judgment, and a 300-thousand dollar "payoff" to the law school as compensation for taking under qualified students --- all as reasons why White and Herman should depart.. "There's certain types of transgressions", said Diehl, "that are just so egregious that they don't merely tip the scale, but they make it come crashing down."

The resolution welcomes invitations from some new trustees for greater Board consultation with the Academic Senate. That's all that survived from a substitute motion that would have called for a review of White and Herman's performance, but would stop short of calling for their removal.

Senate Executive Committee Chair Joyce Tolliver says they proposed that motion after new trustees including Board Chairman Chris Kennedy showed an interest in greater faculty input, during a meeting last Friday with Academic Senate representatives.Tolliver says the level of faculty input proposed would be "unprecedented". But she says she understands the Senate's preference for the original resolution. "It was the consensus of the Senate that it was necessary to make a strong statement", she explained.

Categories: Education

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