Illinois Public Media News

AP - Illinois Public Media News - July 27, 2009

U of I President Pledges to Kill Admissions Clout List and Set New Admissions Policy

University of Illinois President Joseph White says it's no surprise that the university developed a 'Category I' list politically connected applicants for whom inquiries had been made by trustees and politicians.

But he told the Governor's Admissions Review Commission Monday in Urbana that he'd only recently heard of the list, and intends to kill it. White says flagged applications have been around a long time, but he was surprised that applicants he assumed had been rejected ended up being admitted.

White says the University should now take a leadership position on admissions --- one that bars top administrators from interfering in the admissions process. He says that policy would apply tio anyone above the level of dean, and include the Development and Government Relations offices.

"I think that in a year," says White, "we will know whether conventional wisdom is right, and we've really hurt ourselves in terms of donations and how legislators feel about it, et cetera."

During two hours of testimony... White did not make specific recommendations about the U of I Board of Trustees, some of whom had made inquiries on behalf of applicants.

But in testimony earlier in the day, U of I presidents James Stukel and Stanley Ikenberry both told the commission that the Governor should remove either some or nearly all members of the Board of Trustees. Stukel suggested that Board Chairman Naranjan Shah, trustee Robert Vickery, and former chairman Lawrence Eppley all be removed. Ikenberry suggested that all trustees be removed by Governor Pat Quinn with the exception of Ed McMillan, who was recently appointed by the governor. Quinn would then have the authority to interview and re-appoint trustees at his discretion.

Categories: Education, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - July 23, 2009

UI Trustees Ask for Patience in Admissions Scandal

University of Illinois trustees are conducting their own internal review of the influence of money and political power on student admissions.

At the start of their regular meeting in Chicago this morning, trustees said they plan to report their findings soon and offer improved admissions practices they can adopt. Several trustees have appeared this month before the state commission examining admissions at the school's Urbana campus.

Gov. Pat Quinn created the panel after news reports revealed the school maintains a list of politically connected applicants. Some of those applicants gained admission even though they were less qualified than other students who were turned away. The trustees' comment came in the form of a prepared statement.

Categories: Education, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - July 22, 2009

University of Illinois Exploring Furlough Days Option

Budget fears have prompted the University of Illinois to draft a furlough policy. Starting August 16th, school leaders will have the authority to require faculty and academic professionals to take unpaid time off. Employees were notified of the action by U of I's President and the chancellors of the Urbana-Champaign, Springfield and Chicago campuses Wednesday. University spokesman Tom Hardy stresses ... officials are not yet declaring furlough days. He says school leaders adopted the new policy as a contingency plan to control costs should U of I face a budget shortfall. He says there's a great deal of uncertainty about how much funding the university will receive from the state.

"We didn't have this tool to be able to deal with controlling costs in an economic or fiscal crisis. Now we have this ability to deal with anything that arises. And deal with it in a way that we see is very common practice now in public and private sectors," says Hardy. Hardy says officials will begin negotiations to create a permanent furlough policy. But the head of a group representing academic professionals at the U of I Urbana campus says she doesn't think that's a good idea. Jenny Barrett of the Association for Academic Professionals says unpaid furlough days should only be a temporary policy at times when the university faces financial risk. She says otherwise, the budget breaking point that would require furloughs could become vague and prone to misue.

Categories: Education, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - July 21, 2009

UI Trustee Faces Questions Over Future Son-in-Law’s Hiring

A University of Illinois trustee expected to face scrutiny today over admissions now may hear questions about how his son-in-law landed a six-figure job with the school.

The Chicago Tribune reports that trustee Niranjan Shah used his position in 2007 to help find his then-future son-in-law a job. Shah says he encouraged the university to hire Maarten de Jeu after he graduated first in his MBA class at Oxford University.

University Chancellor Richard Herman says the school created a $115,000 job for de Jeu in a business-consulting office. He left the university after 10 months. That's six months after he married Shah's daughter. Shah is scheduled to appear this afternoon before the commission examining the admission of politically connected applicants at the university.

Categories: Education, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - July 14, 2009

Parkland College Recieves Long-Awaited Funds for Student Center

The approval of state capital money for a student services center at Parkland College means administrators will start exploring other sources to complete the facility.

The chairman of the college's board of Trustees, Jim Ayers, says the building is much larger in scope and size than when originally conceived more than 15 years ago as part of a Campus Master Plan. The state is expected to fund roughly half of the center's cost... or $15 million. The rest would likely be sought through a combination of student fee hikes and a referendum. Ayers says such a center is now looked upon as more than a place for students to register for classes and discuss financial aid.

"I think we anticipate the Foundation is going to move there, a restaurant and hospitality program will be put in there someplace, and a wide variety of activites will all be brought under the umbrella of student services," says Ayers. Parkland Vice President of Student Services Linda Moore says having a student center would also free up existing offices for instructional space. While there's no timetable for building such a facility, Ayers says Parkland would likely decide by this fall on a plan to fund the building's remaining cost.

Ayers holds out hope that federal money could be a part of that as well. He cites comments made Tuesday by President Barack Obama, who wants to pump $12 billion dollars into the nation's community colleges, including $2.5 billion for construction.

Categories: Education
Tags: education

AP - Illinois Public Media News - July 14, 2009

Trustee Eppley Denies Forcing UI to Admit Politically Connected Students

University of Illinois trustee Lawrence Eppley says he never forced politically connected students to be admitted to the Champaign-Urbana campus.

Eppley told a special commission he passed along between 5 and 10 names per year for special consideration. He says about half those came from staffers in former Gov. Rod Blagojevich's office.

Eppley says he thought passing the names on was "benign." University employees have testified that they considered inquiries from the trustees to be "directives."

Eppley says he now understands there were problems with the unofficial inquiries that he says functioned as an "underground recommendation system.''

Eppley says the state commission is needed to "fix'' the clout list. Gov. Pat Quinn formed the commission to investigate whether special treatment was given to politically connected applicants, known as "Category I.''

After the Chicago Tribune reported on the "Category I'' list in May, the university suspended it.

(Additional reporting by The Associated Press)

Categories: Education, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - July 14, 2009

History Grant Puts Teachers in the Research Seats

For a fifth straight year, a history education project headed up by the Urbana school district is getting a million-dollar federal grant.

The American History Teachers Collaborative is aimed at giving teachers the research time and resources they need to paint a more realistic and gripping picture of history in their classrooms.

The group's coordinator, Kathy Barbour, says when teachers conduct their own research, they can teach their students about national history through a local lens.

"For the teachers to be able to bring newspaper articles or photographs or documents or letters from right here in central Illinois and bring those to their classrooms, it's a very powerful thing for the students to be able to see that history happens here and we're tied to the bigger picture," Barbour said.

For instance, Barber says teachers have found articles and other documents about events in Champaign County that illustrate the national civil rights movement. She says the money helps fund workshops for teachers in seven area districts as well as research trips to museums.

Categories: Education, History

AP - Illinois Public Media News - July 14, 2009

Former U of I Administrators Say Alumni Association Should Choose Majority of Trustees

Four former presidents and chancellors of the University of Illinois are calling for a change in how members are appointed to the university's board of trustees.

The four, led by former U of I president Stanley Ikenberry, made their recommendation in a letter to the Illinois Admissions Review Commission, which is investigating charges that under-qualified students gained admission based on political influence. In many cases, the pressure to admit the students came from trustees.

Ikenberry says that the roots of the problem lie in having all university trustees selected by the governor. "I think that makes the university vulnerable," he says, "and I think it removes the checks and balances that would otherwise be important to healthy university governance."

In the letter, Ikenberry, former president James Stukel and former Urbana campus chancellors Morton Weir and Michael Aiken suggest a long-term solution. They argue that the U of I Alumni Association should elect six of the nine trustees on the U of I board in a "fair and transparent" manner, with only three selected by the governor. Ikenberry says many universities, such as Penn State, give alumni associations such appointment powers.

The Admissions Review Commission was scheduled to hear from three U of I trustees Tuesday afternoon --- David Dorris, Kenneth Schmidt and former chairman Lawrence Eppley.

Categories: Education, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - July 14, 2009

Champaign School Board Chooses Magnet School Themes for Garden Hills and BTWashington

Garden Hills Elementary School gets the fine arts magnet. Booker T. Washington Elementary School gets the science and math magnet. Those are the recommendations the Champaign School Board approved Monday night for the two schools slated for major renovations.

The Magnet School Planning Committee started developing the recommendations in March. Deputy Superintendent for Student Achievement and Equity Dorland Norris said the committee looked for themes that would be a good match for each school and would attract diverse families.

Norris said the administration's plan to move the Transitional Bilingual Education program from BTWashington School to the larger Garden Hills School was one reason the committee picked the fine arts theme for Garden Hills. She says foreign languages will be a major part of the offerings in the Garden Hills fine arts magnet program.

Garden Hills is being extensively renovated and BTWashington is being completely rebuilt. Both schools will get additional classrooms to meet requirements of the Consent Decree.

Categories: Education

AP - Illinois Public Media News - July 08, 2009

Officials to Testify on Clout at U of Illinois

The state commission that's investigating allegations that political clout was used to get underqualified students into the University of Illinois is meeting again.

The commission will meet Wednesday in Chicago.

Governor Pat Quinn formed the panel last month to look into the university's admissions system after word of the use of clout first surfaced in the Chicago Tribune. The commission is led by former federal Judge Abner Mikva and is due to issue a report next month.

Among those scheduled to testify is Heidi Hurd, former dean of the College of Law. She's now a law professor.

During testimony Monday, an assistant dean said that over four years, the university forced the law school to accept 24 students with political connections who wouldn't have been admitted otherwise.

Categories: Education, Government, Politics

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