Illinois Public Media News

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - August 11, 2011

UI President Opens Up Scholarship to Undocumented Immigrants

University of Illinois President Michael Hogan says he has set up a scholarship fund that is available to students who are U.S. citizens and undocumented immigrants.

Students who are not living in this country lawfully have been ineligible for scholarships in Illinois, but that changed this month after Gov. Pat Quinn signed legislation known as the Illinois Dream Act. The measure opens up privately funded college scholarships to illegal immigrants.

Hogan said he gave a $100,000 contribution to the University of Illinois Foundation for the scholarship, which will be for students majoring in history. He said every student should have a chance to get into the U of I, regardless of their legal status.

"It's both need and merit based," Hogan explained. "They're in a great position now to make a long-time contribution to the well-being of our state, and sustain a great reputation of the university."

Students can apply for the U of I scholarship through financial aid.

Gov. Quinn said he plans to appoint a nine-member commission by the middle of September to oversee scholarships created as a result of the Illinois Dream Act. Students must have at least one immigrant parent and must have attended school in Illinois for at least three years to qualify for scholarship money.

Illinois and several other states already provide undocumented students in-state tuition.

(AP Photo/Seth Perlman)

Categories: Education, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - August 11, 2011

Ill. Sen. Kirk Concerned Joint Committee is too Partisan

Illinois U.S. Sen. Mark Kirk cautioned Congress about a new committee that will fight the federal deficit.

Republicans and Democrats have selected nine of the committee's 12 members. Kirk said he is worried the committee won't be in a position to compromise.

"I worry about this joint commission that it may be too partisan," Kirk said. "One idea that I know will never have a chance would be to have the Democratic leaders to appoint the Republicans and the Republicans leaders appoint the Democrats, so that the people who played best in the sandbox would then take on the work of this joint committee."

Kirk urged President Obama to end the congressional recess so legislators can get the new debt committee ready by Monday.

Congress is not scheduled to return to work until after Labor Day.

(AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

Categories: Economics, Government, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - August 11, 2011

Quinn Admin. Answers Charges on Appointments

Governor Pat Quinn's press secretary is discounting a charge from Republican John Bambenek that the Quinn administration's appointments to many state boards and commissions violate rules setting out how many members of each party may serve on a panel.

Bambanek said many of the governor's Independent appointees are actually Democrats, according to their voting records in primary elections. Among the examples he cites are Illinois Human Rights Commissioner Terry Cosgrove -- who Bambenek said has always voted in Democratic primaries. He also cites University of Illinois trustee Lawrence Oliver, who was appointed as an Independent in 2009, and voted in a Democratic primary in 2010.

But Quinn press secretary Brooke Anderson said those appointed as Independents to boards and commissions by the governor declared themselves as independents when they first applied.

"Each candidate for an appointment goes through a thorough application interview and comprehensive vetting process," Anderson said. "The majority of the governor's appointments have gone to individuals who applied to our website. Political affiliation is evaluated at the time of the appointment, based on the self-declaration of the candidate, and an additional review of the candidate's voting records."

Anderson also questions the credibility of Bambenek's charges, because his list of examples contains errors and includes several appointees held over from previous governors. In reply, Bambenek said his list is based on information on the Quinn administration's appointments as listed on the state appointments website, as of Aug. 1. He said the website was updated after he released his allegations.

Bambenek said that by appointing Independents who are actually Democrats, the Quinn administration is allowing several boards and commissions to have more Democrats than partisan balance rules allow. He said the practice raises questions about the legal status of those bodies that may have to be resolved by a judge.

Bambanek is running for the Republican nomination for state Senate in the 52nd District, against Champaign County Board member Alan Nudo. On the Democrats' side, incumbent Senator Mike Frerichs is seeking re-election.

Categories: Government, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - August 10, 2011

Comptroller Topinka Launches ‘Critters’ Program to Help Animal Shelters

Illinois Comptroller Judy Barr Topinka is showing her love for animals by helping shelters seek out homes for them, and cut down a little on Illinois' deficit.

Her trek around the state to promote the 'Comptroller's Critters' program included a stop Wednesday at the Champaign County Humane Society. Pictures of dogs, cats, and other animals from 70 shelters are now part of Topinka's web site. She calls the program one-stop shop for potential pet owners without spending more money.

"That web site already exists," Topinka said. "We don't buy any new programs. We don't hire any new people. We don't get any computers. There's no extra cost to the taxpayers that's already not out there."

Between housing the animals, and euthanizing them if they aren't found a home, it costs $250 to $300. Topinka said it is not close to Illinois' multi-billion dollar debt, but it's a start.

"But billions of dollars and trillions of dollars don't just start clean out of the box," she said. "They start at hundreds. They start at tens. They start low, and work their way up. And if all these taxing bodies in the state of Illinois get hit up, of which we have close to 80, it's still the same pair of pants, different pocket."

The Humane Society of Central Illinois, based in Normal, also is participating in Comptroller's Critters. As of Tuesday, more than 60 dogs, cats, and other pets have been adopted through the comptroller's new program.

Categories: Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - August 10, 2011

Ill. Gov. Quinn Kills Controversial Scholarship Plan

Gov. Pat Quinn flexed his veto power Wednesday by rewriting legislation in a way that would end the long practice of letting Illinois legislators hand out scholarships to state universities.

Quinn's amendatory veto now compels lawmakers to make a choice about whether to give up the perk as federal prosecutors investigate scholarships awarded by one of their former colleagues.

Because the scholarships are technically tuition waivers, state universities wind up eating the cost of educating the people who receive them. The waivers sometimes have gone to the children of legislators' friends and political allies.

"You can't put perfume on a skunk. This system has had too many problems for too many years and it's time to abolish the legislative scholarship program," Quinn said at a press conference in Chicago.

Federal prosecutors have subpoenaed records regarding scholarships that former state legislator Robert Molaro granted to a supporter's children, according to copies of two subpoenas obtained by The Associated Press. He awarded them to the children of a campaign donor, although it's not clear that they lived in his district, one of the requirements for receiving the scholarships.

Molaro did not return a call for comment Wednesday.

Quinn insisted Wednesday that taxpayer-funded scholarships should be based on financial need and merit.

"Education should not be a political thing where if you know some politician and you're a family member of a donor or something like that," Quinn said.

Under the program, General Assembly members have been allowed to give constituents free tuition each year that equals two, four-year scholarships at a state-funded university. A 2009 Associated Press analysis of the scholarships and state political contribution records found that between 2004 and 2009, at least 41 scholarships went to relatives of someone who gave money to the lawmaker awarding the waiver and at least 42 more went to relatives of other politically connected people, such as donors to other politicians, lobbyists, party officials and others.

Lawmakers have placed restrictions on legislative scholarships over the years, but have rejected Quinn's previous calls for ending the program.

Quinn's amendatory veto doesn't force lawmakers to take action, but it does create a high-profile decision for them to make. They can do nothing and let the bill die, they can override Quinn's changes and keep the scholarships or they can accept the veto and end the scholarship program.

Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan's spokesman Steve Brown said Madigan has previously voted to abolish the program. Illinois Senate President John Cullerton's spokeswoman Rikeesha Phelon said they would evaluate Quinn's veto action "to make sure that it is compliant."

Republican Senate leader Christine Radogno of Lemont praised Quinn's action.

"I have long championed ending the legislative scholarship program which has become rife with abuse and a financial drain on our higher education system. ... Perhaps with the governor's intervention, the legislature will finally realize it is time for this program to end," she said in a statement. Radogno's office said she has opted out of the scholarship program, instead recommending other higher education assistance programs to families.

Quinn said in his veto message that lawmakers should voluntarily stop awarding scholarships until they are barred by law. He also noted that the state's Monetary Award Program scholarship lacks money to cover everyone who qualifies.

"Because of my firm belief in the power of education to uplift and expand opportunity, I believe we must offer the opportunities that scholarships create to those that are the most deserving," he said.

(AP Photo/Seth Perlman, File)

Categories: Education, Government, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - August 10, 2011

Alan Nudo Launches Run for the Ill. Senate

Champaign County Board member Alan Nudo, 63, is running for the Illinois legislature in the 52nd Senate District against Democratic incumbent Mike Frerichs.

Nudo is entering his fifth year with the Champaign County Board. He made the campaign announcement Wednesday morning in Rantoul. Before he can square off against Frerichs, Nudo has to defeat political activist John Bambenek in a Republican primary. However, Nudo said his attention is focused on beating Frerichs in the general election.

"I'm not running against John (Bambenek)," Nudo said. "I want to distance myself against Mr. Frerichs. John's got his own position and he's going to do what he has to do. My job is to provide jobs for the state of Illinois and this district."

Nudo said he would have voted down the 67 percent income tax hike that passed the General Assembly earlier this year with Senator Frerichs' support.

Nudo is president of the development firm, Robeson's Inc., and he said his pro-business attitude will be valuable in his effort to spur job growth in the 52nd Senate District.

"You get a better business environment; a rising tide lifts all boats," he said. "What union member, what trades person, what non-union member wouldn't want to have more jobs created? Why shouldn't they vote for me?"

The newly redrawn district includes Champaign-Urbana and Danville.

(Photo by Sean Powers/WILL)

Categories: Biography, Government, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - August 10, 2011

Bambenek Charges Quinn Appointments Break Partisan Rules

State Senate candidate John Bambenek claims that many independents appointed to boards and commissions by Gov. Pat Quinn are actually Democrats.

The Champaign Republican said many of Quinn's appointees listed as Independent are actually Democrats as defined by state election law --- because they voted in recent Democratic primaries. One example Bamanek considers to be the most blatant is Illinois Human Rights Commissioner Terry Cosgrove, whose political action committee, Personal PAC, supported Quinn's campaign last year.

"It's no secret that Terry Cosgrove is a Democrat," Bambenek said. "He's voted Democrat his entire life. He's known by Pat Quinn personally; he's known by many of the senators personally. For him to show up suddenly as an Independent when he's up for a state job on a committee that has a partisan balance requirement, it defies credulity that that was not an intentional choice on the part of Pat Quinn."

Other Independents with Democratic voting records listed by Bambenek include Illinois State Board of Education member David Fields (a former Danville school superintendent), and University of Illinois Trustee Lawrence Oliver. Citing that example, Quinn's press secretary, Brooke Anderson, said Oliver had not voted in a primary, and declared himself as an Independent when he was interviewed.

Anderson said many appointees are taken at their word, and some who have been appointed did the same thing as Oliver.

"Each candidate for an appointment goes through a thorough application, interview, and comprehensive vetting process," she said. "The majority of the governor's appointments have got to individuals who have applied to our web site. Political affiliation is evaluated at the time of the appointment based on the self-declaration of the candidate, and an additional review of the candidate's voting record,"

Bambenek said that by listing Democrats as Independents, Quinn is violating partisan balance rules on eleven state boards and commissions, and effectively allowing those panels to have more Democrats than the law allows. He says the practice raises questions about the legal status of those bodies that may have to be resolved by a judge.

"It could be that the last man out gets his appointment nullified," Bambenek speculated. "Somebody could turn around and say all the action of that board since this condition was true is null and void. You can stop elements of state government, because of this kind of egregious end-run around the law."

But Anderson said Bambenek's charge against the governor is not credible. She said Bambenek's summary of board and commission members includes errors, and fails to note that many of the members in question were appointed by previous governors. For instance, Independent Capital Development Board member Mark Ladd --- who Bambenek said voted in the 2010 Democratic primary --- was actually appointed in 2002, during the administration of then-Gov. George Ryan. Bambenek also lists Democrat Stephen Toth as a member of the Capital Development Board. But Anderson said Toth, whose term officially expired in 2008, has left the board.

John Bambenek is a Champaign resident who's seeking the Republican nomination for State Senate in the 52nd District. The newly redrawn district includes Champaign-Urbana and Danville. Champaign County Board Member Alan Nudo is also seeking the GOP nomination in that race. Democrat incumbent Mike Frerichs is running for re-election in the district.

Categories: Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - August 10, 2011

Quinn Picks Giannoulias as Chair of Illinois Community College Board

Former state Treasurer and failed U.S. Senate candidate Alexi Giannoulias has a new post.

Gov. Pat Quinn has picked the 35-year-old Democrat to serve as chairman of the Illinois Community College Board. The part-time position is unpaid.

Giannoulias tells the Chicago Sun-Times that he's "incredibly excited" to help reform Illinois' community colleges. He says a well-educated work force is crucial to putting Americans back to work.

Giannoulias lost the U.S. Senate race to Republican Mark Kirk last year.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - August 09, 2011

State Funding for Higher Ed. Still Concern for New UI Chancellor

The next chancellor of the University of Illinois' Urbana campus says she is ready to get to work.

Dr. Phyllis Wise spoke to members of the university community Tuesday about her upcoming role at the U of I. Wise is currently the provost and executive vice president at the University of Washington. But she is expected to start her new job at the U of I in a couple of months.

Wise said she knows a lot about the financial challenges facing universities. She said UW has dealt with deep funding cuts in recent years from its state legislature.

"In Washington, they provide relatively little amount of money toward our overall budget," Wise said. "It's been pretty grim, but the state legislature really realized that they could not do it themselves, and they gave us tuition delegating authority."

Wise said UW administrators raised tuition by 20 percent, after increasing it 14 percent during each of the two previous years. She also said financial aid was increased at UW to expand the pool of students eligible for assistance.

Last spring, tuition at the U of I went up by 6.9 percent for the next school year. Wise said she suspects she will have a big role working with the Illinois General Assembly to convince lawmakers to raise state support for higher education.

Chris Kennedy, who chairs the U of I's Board of Trustees, said he is confident Wise's experience as a researcher and administrator will help the university boost support from the state and individual research grants.

"I think the fact that we were able to recruit her sends a strong message all over the United States that the University of Illinois is a place for great researchers and academic achievers," Kennedy said. "We want to increase our research grants and contracts because those are the grants and contracts that attract the great researchers. Those great researchers attract the great graduate students, who attract the great students. You have this tremendous snowball effect."

Kennedy said he expects the Board of Trustees will unanimously approve Wise's appointment, so that she can start Oct. 1st. If approved, all three U of I chancellors will be women for the first time.

Wise was chosen about three weeks ago after a nearly nine-month search, but her appointment wasn't made public until last week, according to UI Physics Professor Doug Beck, who led the search committee.

U of I President Michael Hogan has confirmed that Wise will earn $500,000 a year and $100,000 per year deferred if she stays in the position for five years.

Wise would replace interim Chancellor Robert Easter, who took the job after the 2009 resignation of Richard Herman following an admissions scandal.

"We are at a pivotal time in higher education," Easter said. "What's the future of a major research university like this? I think we're perfectly poised to discover that future. My advice (to her) would not be bashful to thinking about the faculty and leadership about how we move ahead aggressively in areas that will create our future."

Easter said following his two-year stint as interim chancellor, he hopes to gain emeritus status. He also said he plans to occasionally come back to the U of I to teach in the Department of Animal Sciences.

(Photo by Sean Powers/WILL)


AP - Illinois Public Media News - August 09, 2011

ComEd: Smart Grid Could Save Customers $2.8 Billion

Commonwealth Edison says smart grid technology could save customers more than $2.8 billion over the next 20 years.

ComEd released an analysis Monday from Black & Veatch that puts the cost of installing smart grid as less than or equal to the savings.

Mike McMahan, vice president of Smart Grid and Technology for ComEd, said a rate hike of $3 per customer would cover the cost of the technology, and it would be made up soon after the smart grid was installed.

"We estimate at least $2 of that would be returned to the customer on their bills at the end of the deployment period and there would be an additional $1 in savings associated with fewer outages," he said. "So benefit to the consumer that doesn't pass through the utility."

McMahan said the savings identified in the analysis would come from three major changes. First, the smart grid technology would eliminate manual meter reading, and thus meter reading jobs, because the smart meters would send information directly to ComEd. This would also mean, according to ComEd, more accurate bills and fewer service visits. Secondly, McMahan said smart meters would detect electricity theft and therefore cut down on energy losses. Lastly, McMahan said the new technology would bring enhanced disconnection and reconnection of services, minimizing collection costs during storms, power outages or even when a renter is ending their ComEd service.

Yet all of this rests on the signature of Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn. Earlier this year, legislators in Springfield passed the Energy Infrastructure Modernization Act that would authorize rate hikes for both ComEd and Ameren customers to foot the smart grid bill. Quinn has said he would not sign the measure, as he wants power companies, rather than consumers, to pay for smart grid.

The bill doesn't sit well with members of the Citizens Utility Board. Executive Director David Kolata said he supports installing smart grid, but he does not think this bill is the way to do it.

"I think this analysis is further evidence that smart grid would be good investment for consumers -- we do think it's something that will save consumers money in medium and long term," Kolata said. "It's the other parts, though, that are problematic. You have to make sure you get those right. It's serving as Trojan horse for significant regulatory changes that apply to all ComEd's costs -- if it was just smart grid, it would have passed already."

The bill is currently on Gov. Quinn's desk.


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