Illinois Public Media News

AP - Illinois Public Media News - November 02, 2010

High Turn Out of Voters Head to the Polls in Champaign County

Champaign County clerk Mark Shelden said he expects a near-record turnout by the time polls close Tuesday night.

Shelden said he thinks more than 55,000 voters will make it to the polls, which is well above the 2002 record for a non-presidential election year. By contrast, Shelden said more than 84,000 Champaign County residents voted in the 2008 presidential race.

"We had to bring a few ballots out to places, especially federal only ballots," Shelden said. "I think we're seeing kind of a significant uptick in those ballots, and those are people who didn't get their addresses updated in time."

Election judges at two Champaign polling sites report that there has been a steady stream of voters coming in throughout the day. About 400 people cast their ballots by Tuesday afternoon at St. John's Lutheran Church. At the McKinley Foundation, things were slower, as they often are for Campustown polling sites. Still, more than 40 came in by late morning while as many as four had to wait in line.

At The Church of Christ on Philo Road, voter Melanie Kruger said she rarely misses an election, and used this one to take some frustration out on incumbents by choosing third-party candidates in some races.

"I'm just tired of people getting into the office, and then seeming to put priority on their party rather than on their constituents," Kruger said. "I don't know how else to protest."

Shelden said more than 6,000 votes were cast well before Tuesday's opening of the polls, and he said a few more absentee ballots will trickle in over the next few days. He added that there have been few minor problems at a couple of Champaign County polling places with tabulators, but he said those problems were eventually resolved with no effect on voting.

(Photo by Jeff Bossert/WILL)

Categories: Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - November 01, 2010

Quinn, Brady Urge Voters to Get to the Polls

Candidates for Illinois governor touted their efforts to create jobs and reduce the state's $13 billion budget deficit during campaign stops in Savoy.

Democratic Governor Pat Quinn returned to Savoy's Plumbers and Pipefitters Union Hall where he was joined by union members and state elected officials.

Quinn said while his Republican opponent, State Senator Bill Brady of Bloomington, seeks to cut the state's minimum wage and slash education funding by more than a billion dollars, he said his own initiatives while serving as governor have helped the state's unemployment rate begin to drop in the past nine months.

"We're not going to be tearing down Illinois; we're building up," Quinn explained. "We want to make sure we have the proper funding for our schools, and for our students."

Quinn touted his efforts to rescue Illinois' Monetary Awards Program, which provides grants to college-bound students. He blasted Brady for wanting to cut education programs and the minimum wage.

"If you're working 40 hours a week, you shouldn't have to live in poverty," Quinn said.

As Quinn was talking to supporters, Brady was nearby at Savoy's Willard Airport where he criticized Quinn's track record as governor, and reiterated his own plans to balance the state's budget without raising taxes.

"The last two years have been a failure for Illinois under (Quinn's) reign," Brady said. "Illinois needs a governor who will put the people first, not a governor who has secret deals, secret early release programs, secret pay raises, secret tax increases, and record unemployment."

Looking forward to Tuesday's legislative races, Brady predicted Republicans will set victory records across the state.

"We're going to do better than we've ever done," Brady said. "For too long we've had a Chicago-centric governance that needs to understand that there's more to Illinois than Chicago."

With Congressman and U.S. Senate hopeful, Mark Kirk, by his side, Brady also said he thinks Illinois voters will shift party leadership in the U.S. House of Representative by sending as many as four more Republicans to Congress.

Despite polls showing Brady ahead, both candidates are working to get out the vote until the polls close. The Green Party's Rich Whitney, Independent Scott Lee Cohen, and Libertarian Lex Green are also on the ballot.

(Photos by Jeff Bossert/WILL and Sean Powers/WILL)


AP - Illinois Public Media News - November 01, 2010

Reminding Voters to Vote While at the Polls

A computerized alert system is reminding voters this election year to choose a candidate for each of Illinois' constitutional offices, which include governor, lieutenant governor, and attorney general.

The technology aimed at catching ballot errors stems from a 2007 law that took effect during the February 2 primary election. If a voter forgets or chooses not to vote for a candidate, they are notified to make that vote if they choose.

The alerts are only used during election years when constitutional office holders are on the ballot. Sixty seven counties in the state use the ballot alerts at polling places, but not every county uses them in the same way.

For example, in Champaign County, voters get an on-screen notification when they do not fill out a response for one of the state's six constitutional offices. However, in Macon County, voters are alerted when they skip any ballot measure. Macon County Clerk Steve Bean said election laws should apply to every item on the ballot.

"The most concern of most clerks is this is a law that affects six offices selected in the state of Illinois," Bean said. "It doesn't care about any of the others."

County Champaign Clerk Mark Shelden, whose county restricts the alerts to constitutional offices only, filed a lawsuit in November 2009 against the Illinois State Board of Elections. He claimed that the alerts violated voters' rights to privacy. However, Shelden later dropped the lawsuit because of budgetary reasons.

"If the legislature doesn't act in the spring," Shelden explained. "I definitely think the lawsuit needs to be brought back."

While the technology alerts people of a missed vote, it does not discard ballots.\

(Photo by Tom Rogers/WILL)


AP - Illinois Public Media News - November 01, 2010

IL Senate Candidates Make Final Campaign Stops

Whoever wins Tuesday's U.S. Senate race in Illinois will likely get to work right away rather than waiting until President Barack Obama's old senate term ends in January.

Roland Burris currently holds that seat. Burris was appointed to the Senate by former Governor Rod Blagojevich, who was arrested, impeached, and then removed from office. A special election coupled with the general election will allow voters to choose a candidate for a six week term before starting a full six year term.

At a campaign stop Monday at Savoy's Willard Airport, Republican U.S. Senate hopeful Mark Kirk told a crowd of supporters that change in the U.S. Senate will come sooner in Illinois than in any other state.

"Your vote counts more than the vote of all 49 other states because you send a senator right away to the United States Senate," Kirk said.

Kirk, who has represented Illinois' 10th congressional district since 2001, said he plans to return to Washington to help stop a trillion dollar spending bill and a national sales tax.

Kirk's opponent, Illinois' Democratic State Treasurer Alexi Giannoulias, said there is not a race in the country with a "sharper contrast'' between candidates than him and Kirk. He said Kirk has consistently voted against what he calls Obama's efforts to get the economy back on track. Giannoulias stopped at the Abraham Lincoln Capitol Airport in Springfield earlier in the day to greet supporters. Giannoulias blasted Kirk's record in Congress.

"Now (Kirk) says he's the candidate who spends less, taxes less and borrows less," Giannoulias said. "No one in this race has spent more, borrowed more, taxed more and led less than Congressman Kirk in Washington DC."

Kirk and Giannoulias are in a tight race. Recent polls show the two candidates neck-and-neck, with Kirk having a slight lead. The Green Party's LeAlan Jones and Libertarian Mike Labno are also vying for the U.S. Senate seat.

(Photos by Sean Powers/WILL)

Categories: Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - October 29, 2010

Area Superintendent Critical of State Testing, Other Criteria Ranking School Districts

The Rantoul City Schools are among the nearly 2,000 Illinois schools that did not make Adequate Yearly Progress, or AYP, this year.

Superintendent Bill Trankina called the Illinois Student Achievement Test a mere snapshot of performance. His district includes four grade schools and a middle school.

Rantoul Township High School has a separate administration, but it also failed to make AYP. Trankina noted that his district has a mobility rate of about 35-percent, and a poverty rate of over 80-percent. Still, he said students are making fundamental changes in reading and writing. He noted that his district has installed smart boards into each classroom, which should help state test scores. Trankina said he is frustrated by the lack of clarity on the state's report card, citing an example of how a subgroup's performance impacts an entire district.

"If a child attended school all day everyday, had passing grades, then in the fourth quarter happened to fail one course, and (the district said) 'we know your child passed everything every quarter, except for the fourth quarter they fail one subject - your child's going to be retained for next year," Trankina said. "Immediately the parent would be very upset. I think we all see the absurdity in that example."

Trankina also said analyzing test scores in two time periods with different standards really is not a fair comparison.

"To a certain degree, we're being evaluated and placed on certain academic watch status based upon how students did when the standards were administered in the past," Trankina said. "And we think that only compounds to the confusion that most people feel about the standards."

Trankina also said it is terribly unfair that the performance of one subgroup on the Illinois Student Achievement Test would decide whether the entire district made AYP. On a local level, he said the district is making strides with a new writing and reading curriculum.

Categories: Education, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - October 29, 2010

State Transportation Money will Fund Area Bike, Pedestrian Trails

State grants are going to several projects in eastern Illinois that will make the way clearer for bicyclists and pedestrians. They range from nearly $626,000 to add bike lanes and walkway improvements to Urbana's Main Street to more than $1.24 million for a new bike path through Danville's Lincoln Park Historic District.

Another project getting funding is a proposed bike trail on a former railroad bed between Urbana and Kickapoo State Park near Danville. Steve Rugg heads the Champaign County Design and Conservation Foundation, which is working with the Champaign County Forest Preserve District on the so-called Kickapoo Trail. Rugg said the nearly $900,000 grant would help pay for land acquisition, but he said talks with the current owner of the rail bed have been deadlocked.

"We continue to work with CSX," said Rugg. "To this point we have not reached agreement, and it remains to be seen whether we'll actually get the acquisition completed."

The Illinois State Department of Transportation is giving out more than $6 million for the trails to help promote alternatives to driving. The village of Mahomet is also getting $1.18 million to help develop a pathway along Lake of the Woods Road, and the village of Rantoul will get to work on a bike path with a $782,000 grant.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - October 29, 2010

Quinn, Brady Tout Experience On Last Lap of Campaign

With less than a week until Election Day, it looks like a tight race for Illinois Governor.

Pre-election polls show Republican State Senator Bill Brady of Bloomington has a chance to take the office from incumbent Pat Quinn, a Democrat.

Brady said if he is elected, he will give up a leadership role in his family's real estate development business.

Governor Quinn has tried to nail Brady for using his position as a state senator to help line his own pockets. Published reports detail that Brady voted for legislation affecting land near Champaign that his family's home construction firm had purchased with plans to develop it. The project did not go forward, but the measure would have upped the land's property value. Quinn said Brady's vote was a conflict of interest

"There are no conflicts with my business and state government," he said. "But being Governor of the State of Illinois is a full-time job. I will recuse myself of the management responsibility I've had in the business and focus full time on the state of Illinois."

Still, that is a signal he will not fully leave the business behind. The firm has fallen on hard times in recent years, taking losses to the point Brady owed no federal income taxes.

Quinn has also attacked Brady for not paying taxes while Brady said it shows how Illinois businesses have suffered under Democratic leadership.

Brady's running mate is Jason Plummer, a 27-year-old who used his family's wealth to propel his primary campaign. Plummer has never before held state office.

Quinn is living proof a Lieutenant Governor could be moved into the state's top spot. He became Governor after Rod Blagojevich's removal from office. Critics say Plummer is too inexperienced.

"Jason Plummer has a great deal of experience at a family business, not even a small business, a large business, that he has been involved in," Brady said. "He's a member of the Navy, Reserves, and and he's got a great deal of experience. I think his experience puts him in a great position to help lead as Lieutenant Governor of the state and I'm proud to have him on the ticket."

However, Brady said there's "room to adjust" Illinois' method of letting primary voters elect governor and lieutenant governor nominees separately in the primary. Brady did not pick Plummer to share the ticket. Only after the general election do the winners run as a team. Quinn also ran separately from Blagojevich in two primaries.

Other contenders in the gubernatorial race include the Green Party's Rich Whitney, Libertarian Lex Green and independent Scott Lee Cohen.

(Elmhurst College/flcikr)

Categories: Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - October 29, 2010

Champaign County Early Voting Numbers Expected to Reach 6,000

Heavy turnout has made an early voting site on the University of Illinois campus a success, according to the Champaign County Clerk.

Mark Shelden said when the Gregory Place location closed Thursday, 857 people had cast their ballot. Meanwhile, 2,981 had cast their ballots at Urbana's Brookens Center, meaning with absentee totals thus far, a total of 5,386 had already voted. But at the campus polling site, Shelden said only about 10-percent of the voters were U of I students. He said voters from all over the county came to the site over the 18-day early voting period, including faculty and people living in rural areas.

The campus polling site was mandated by a new state law, but Shelden suggested an alternative, if legislators are willing to fund it.

"You could do two or three days in Mahomet, two or three days in St. Joseph, a couple days in the western campus area and a couple of days in the eastern campus area," he said. "I mean, there are ways to do it that can be fair for everybody and at the same time, not overly tax all our resources."

Shelden selected Gregory Place over the Illini Union, saying the heavy political activity there made it inappropriate site for early voting. Democrats on the Champaign County Board and the U of I Student Senate opposed the decision, saying the Union would be free to use and easier to find.

David Pileski, who chairs the Student Senate's Committee on Governmental Affairs, said a more open dialogue with Shelden may have produced a compromise.

"There's Foellinger Hall, which houses a lot of space that students could vote early in, as well as other buildings that could be utilized on this campus had we dealt with it in advance prior to a couple of months," Pileski said.

This was the first election to include a state-mandated campus polling site. Nolan Drea, the Vice President of the Student Senate, suggested legislators write a stronger bill that specifies that all campus early voting take place at a university-owned location, like a campus union.

Shelden said voters have not complained about the Gregory street location, or paying the parking meters there. Champaign County's total of early votes for the 2006 election was less than 4,000. Shelden says with the additional absentee votes and ballots from voters in nursing homes, Champaign County will likely have cast more than 6,000 ballots before polls even open on Tuesday.

(Photo by Jim Meadows/WILL)

Categories: Education, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - October 28, 2010

Unemployment Rate Shows Promise

The job market in Illinois is showing a sign of improvement.

The unemployment rate for September in the Champaign-Urbana area fell from 9.4% in August to 8.3% in September - that's .4 less than at this time a year ago.

The state Department of Employment Security says every other metropolitan area in the state also saw a lower jobless rate in September compared to September of 2009 - the first time a statewide decrease has taken place since early 2007.

About 800 more people in the Champaign area were working in September over August according to the monthly figures. Danville's unemployment rate fell in the last month to 10.8% - Decatur's jobless rate dropped to 10.9%. Bloomington-Normal continues to have the lowest unemployment rate in Illinois at 7.2%.

Categories: Economics, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - October 28, 2010

Survey of Health Care Stances Differentiates Candidates

A voter guide put out by a local health care advocacy group shows rough adherence to political party lines when it comes to health care issues and Illinois candidates.

Of the candidates running for the U.S. House and Senate, only Congressional candidate David Gill (D-Bloomington) responded to the survey from the Champaign County Health Care Consumers, but state Senate candidate Al Reynolds (R-Danville) and State Representative Naomi Jakobsson (D-Champaign) took part.

The group's director, Claudia Lennhoff, said even though this year's health care overhaul is a national undertaking, state lawmakers' views on health care play a big role.

"So much of the implementation of national health reform actually happens at the state level and requires state legislatures to pass laws in order to enact some of the health reform changes," said Lennhoff.

While Jakobsson supports implementing the health care bill, Reynolds opposes it. However, Reynolds and Jakobsson agree that the state should enact controls on rising health insurance premiums.

Categories: Government, Health, Politics

Page 325 of 409 pages ‹ First  < 323 324 325 326 327 >  Last ›