Illinois Public Media News

AP - Illinois Public Media News - October 19, 2010

Tate & Lyle Announces New Facility to Absorb Some—But Not All—Decatur HQ Jobs

The city of Decatur will lose about 80 jobs at one of its biggest employers, but a city official said it is better than losing the entire facility.

Reports of Tate and Lyle looking for a new headquarters site near Chicago stirred worries that the firm with deep roots in Decatur was going to relocate its U.S. headquarters, but on Tuesday the British-based food ingredients processor announced plans to build a "Commercial and Food Innovation Center" in Hoffman Estates. The new operation will house the majority of research and development now being done in Decatur. About 160 positions will be based in the new Center, but the firm said only about 80 will be relocated from Decatur.

"We're excited about this investment that we're making, and it's really helping to transform the company into the world leading specialty food and ingredients business," said company spokesman Chris Olsen.

The company, which makes products such as high fructose corn syrup, will keep its American headquarters and leadership team in place - and for that, Decatur city manager Ryan McCrady credited the persuasive powers of area leaders.

"At the end of the day we don't exactly know why they make their decisions," McCrady said. "Obviously Decatur is a much lower-cost alternative as far as operating when you compare it to Chicago. Low water and sewer rates and our inexpensive housing for their employees we feel are all a factor."

Tate and Lyle will get a $15 million package of incentives from the state Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity for the new Chicago-area facility, but McCrady said the state has to walk a fine line between helping one location and helping the entire state retain jobs.

With about 500 jobs remaining in Decatur, Olson said the company will continue to be a significant part of the community.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - October 15, 2010

City of Champaign May Need to Cut $2 Million More From Budget

Champaign department heads are developing a contingency plan, in case $2-million in cuts are needed.

Those reductions are in addition to the $9-million in reductions the city has already made the last few years. Several pages of suggested cuts will be discussed late next month by the city council. Assistant City Manager Dorothy David said cuts could include customer service jobs in the city building and police department's front desk, and reduced service hours in public works. She said it is getting to the point where snow removal could be impacted, and the city may need to make adjustments in routes and how quickly snow is removed. David said Champaign's resources to run city government are at 2006 levels.

"Even though we are seeing very slow revenue growth, our revenues are not growing as fast as our costs," said David. "When your costs grow faster than the amount of money that you're bringing in, you have to make adjustments. So the economy has really impacted us in that way."

David said if the state takes further action to reduce revenues that it shares with the city, like income tax, that would mean additional cuts. The city council will discuss these proposals in a study session November 23rd, and could develop a plan to implement them in January.

Categories: Economics, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - October 15, 2010

Rhoades Free to Oversee Piatt County Election

It is likely that the upcoming election will be overseen by the sitting Piatt County Clerk. A challenge to Piatt County Clerk Pat Rhoades has been thrown out of a county court.

Attorney Dan Clifton argued that Rhoades moved out of the county and thus should not be able to serve the last two months of her term. Rhoades is retiring at the end of the year, and her successor will be determined in the next election. Attorney Dan Clifton had charged that Rhoades and her family had permanently moved to Champaign County - Rhoades had said the move was temporary while they built a new home.

Judge John Shonkwiler dismissed Clifton's complaint.

Deanna Mool, who represented Rhoades, argued that Clifton did not allow a state's attorney or the attorney general to file or deny the challenge first.

"In order to get a declaratory judgment, you have to have some right that's going to be irrevocably harmed," Mool said. "This is just not that kind of controversy."

Clifton said he will not be able to file a new complaint until after Election Day, and he said he is not sure if he will try to challenge Rhodes in the last month of her term.

If no other challenges are filed, Rhoades will oversee the November 2nd election in Piatt County. Clifton stressed that the judge dismissed the case on a legal technicality and did not rule on whether Rhoades is eligible to serve.

Categories: Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - October 15, 2010

Champaign Unit 4 Suggests Seven Potential Sites For New Central High

Preliminary talks have started about building a new Central High School in Champaign.

About 50 residents attended Unit 4's first meeting to look at seven potential sites for replacing the more than 70-year old school. The district will use more than $3-million in facilities sales tax money to buy land for the school by next spring or fall, and a tax referendum for school construction will not go before voters until 2012 or 2013. If it passes on the district's first attempt, the new school would be built about two years later.

David Frye has a son in 7th grade, and said he hopes the work is done by time he graduates.

"That's six years from now. and I guess I've got my doubts at this point that he's going to benefit from this at all," Frye said. "I know there's always this question of, 'what's in it for me?' But what's in it for me is the chance to see my son and my son's friends get to graduate from a nice, modern high school. I'd love to see that."

Frye said his older son was involved in music and sports at Central, forcing him to walk to other school campuses for practice or games.

Unit 4 wants the new school to accommodate 1,500 or more students, with those practice areas on site, and nearby park space. Unit 4 School Board President Dave Tomlinson said he estimates a tax referendum would require $50 to $80 million. He said the seven sites are being studied not only with population growth in mind, but the transportation available for getting to them.

Nancy Hoetker is a Central High parent.

"There's a lot of us who currently drive a fair amount to get our children where they need to be here at Central," Hoetker said. "And we're going to be able to do that wherever we are, but there's another population that relies on the public transportation or proximity, and how are they going to be served by these locations."

Of the seven potential sites for the new school, four are near the north end of Prospect Avenue, including one along Olympian Drive. Two are west of First Street and south of Windsor Avenue, and one is west of I-57 in Northwest Champaign. Unit 4's web site will soon contain a place for sending in comments on those locations.

(Photo by Jeff Bossert/WILL)

(Graphic Courtesy of Champaign Unit 4 Schools)


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - October 14, 2010

Third Party Candidates for Illinois Governor Look at Tackling Budget Deficit

Whoever wins the election for Illinois governor will face a budget deficit hovering somewhere around $13 billion. Democratic Governor Pat Quinn supports an income tax hike that would reduce the deficit - but not eliminate it. Republican state Senator Bill Brady says he would start by cutting all areas of the budget by 10-percent or more. There are more ideas out there - from the three other candidates for governor. Illinois Public Radio's Sam Hudzik takes a look at their plans for the budget.

(Photo courtesy of Daniel Schwen)

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Categories: Economics, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - October 13, 2010

Teen Arrested Following Fatal 2009 Shooting Contends Champaign Police Chief Fired Shot

UPDATE: This story was updated October 15th to include comments from Alfred Ivey, attorney for Jeshuan Manning-Carter and Laura Manning.

The teen arrested last October when 15-year old Kiwane Carrington was killed during an altercation with Champaign Police has filed a lawsuit against the city.

In the suit filed October 6th by 16-year old Jeshaun Manning-Carter and his mother, Laura Manning - they contend that it was Police Chief RT Finney, and not officer Daniel Norbits, who fired the bullet that killed Carrington. The shooting was ruled accidental, and no charges were filed. Norbits remains on leave while contesting a 30-day unpaid suspension. The lawsuit filed by attorney Alfred Ivy reads that Finney "fired a shot downward into the chest of Kiwane Carrington, killing Carrington."

Champaign Deputy City Attorney Trisha Crowley said the allegations are completely false, and she added that the city will vigorously defend them.

"There's been extensive internal and external investigations by law enforcement agencies and others," said Crowley. "The evidence has always been extremely clear that Chief Finney was not the shooter in this case."

Alfred Ivey, the attorney for Manning-Carter and his mother, says he filed the suit using the story Manning Carter gave him - a version of the shooting incident that he says went untold because the teenager was traumatized by Carrington's death.

"I saw this (Manning-Carter's delay in speaking out) as him trying to get himself back in balance", says Ivey. "Because, instead of being allowed to grieve properly for his best friend, who he saw shot and killed in front of him, he's now fighting a criminal case."

Manning-Carter was charged with resisting a peace officer, but the charges were later dismissed.

The family of Kiwane Carrington recently settled with the city after a separate lawsuit, agreeing on an amount of 470-thousand dollars.

It has been just over a year since Carrington was killed following a report of a break-in at a home on West Vine Street. The home was used as a starting point for this year's Champaign-Urbana Unity March, held October 9th


AP - Illinois Public Media News - October 13, 2010

Illinois EPA Chief Announces Local Fund, Discusses CAFO Regulation

Illinois EPA Chief Doug Scott came to Champaign County Wednesday to announce funding for three local projects aimed at cleaning up local air and water.

Scott visited the Champaign-Urbana MTD bus garage to announce a $445,000 Clean Diesel grant --- backed by federal stimulus money --- to retrofit 43 diesel buses with special exhaust filters designed to keep diesel particulate from getting into the outside air.

"They capture about 90 percent of the diesel sub-particulates, and 75-80 percent of the hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide emitted from diesel engines," Scott said. "This will provide more clean air for the employees and also for the public, the staff, the students at the U of I who ride the buses or walk near the bus routes."

The CU-MTD worked with researchers at the University of Illinois College of Agricultural Consumer and Environmental Sciences to choose the right filters for their buses and the local climate, as well as setting protocol for installation and maintenance.

While in Urbana, Scott also announced $47 million in federal stimulus and state loans to finance improvements at the Urbana-Champaign Sanitary District's Northeast Wastewater Treatment plant in Urbana.

Later, Scott visited the small Champaign County village of Homer, which is receiving more than $10 million dollars in state grants and loans to finance the construction of its first-ever wastewater plant and centralized sewage collection system. The project will replace the individual septic systems currently used by Homer residents and businesses.

During his Urbana stop, Scott also said the Illinois EPA is working to meet a federally imposed deadline for strengthening state regulation of large confined-animal farms, known as confined-animal feeding operations (CAFO).

The federal EPA has given its Illinois counterpart until the end of the month to complete an inventory of the state's CAFO's, overhaul its inspection program and set procedures for investigating citizen complaints.

Scott said his agency has been working on the issue for the last couple of years, and expects to have a "good response" for the federal EPA's demand.

"We take this issue very seriously," Scott said. "We know that these facilities have the potential to cause some large (scale) pollution, and we know that it's important for us to get the best handle we can on that --- both in terms of permitting, but also in terms of enforcement. And that's the steps we have been taking, and what we will continue to do."

A federal EPA report last month found widespread problems with Illinois' oversight of large-scale cattle, hog and chicken operations, and the huge amounts of waste that they produce. The report found state inspection reports that failed to say if a CAFO was following pollution laws or not, and many cases where the state failed to get farms to comply with those laws.

The report also indicated that the Illinois EPA's enforcement powers are too weak. Scott said he will ask state lawmakers next year to give his agency authority that is currently left to the state attorney general.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - October 13, 2010

The Debate Over the 17th Congressional District District

The 17th congressional district in Illinois is one of the most odd looking districts in the nation. It twists and turns through Western and Central Illinois from the Mississippi River to Decatur. The district was drawn that way to ensure it remains in the Democratic Party's hands, but conservatives feel the incumbent is vulnerable and are ratcheting up the pressure as they try to change the seat from blue to red. Illinois Public Radio's Rich Egger reports.

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Categories: Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - October 12, 2010

New Poll Suggests Quinn Trails Brady by Wide Margins

A new poll from the Paul Simon Public Policy Institute at Southern Illinois University Carbondale shows Bill Brady (R-Bloomington) with a nearly nine-point lead over his opponent, Democrat Pat Quinn, in the race for Illinois Governor.

The data, released Tuesday, gives Brady 38 percent of the vote to Quinn's roughly 30 percent.

Simon Institute Director David Yepsen said Quinn should be worried about the 22 percent of voters who still say they are undecided. The report also indicates that Republicans are "more enthusiastic" about this election than Democrats, which could translate to fewer people voting on Election Day.

"That's a huge number, and it certainly can tip in any direction," Yepsen said. "I think that's a bad thing for Governor Quinn that the undecided are that high because in a race featuring an incumbent, many undecided will tend to break for the challenger come election day."

As for the senate race, Democrat Alexi Giannoulias and Republican Mark Kirk are nearly tied with Kirk at 37.3% support to Giannoulias' 36.8%. Yepsen said he is not surprised by the nearly dead heat between Giannoulias and Kirk. He said the results of the poll show the battles will be won or lost in the collar counties, where voters remain on the fence on many issues in the race. Third party candidates LeAlan Jones of the Green Party has 3.3 percent and Libertarian Mike Labno has 1.8 percent. There are 20.7 percent who are undecided or who favor another candidate.

(Photo of Pat Quinn courtesy of Chris Eaves & photo of Bill Brady courtesy of the Bill Brady for Governor campaign)

Categories: Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - October 12, 2010

Early Voting Center Opens in Urbana

The new Early Voting Center at the University of Illinois Urbana campus is open for business, but there's disagreement about the center's location and level of convenience.

Champaign County Democrats wanted the state-mandated early voting center to be in the U of I's Illini Union, but Republican County Clerk Mark Shelden rented an unfinished storefront in the Gregory Place complex on the east side of campus instead. Shelden said the location would suffer less interference from political activity. Election Judge Kathy Hamilton was helping to staff the center on Tuesday, and she said it is a central location, and accessible for people with disabilities.

"If someone is in a wheelchair, there's a ramp right in front of us," Hamilton said. "They can come in, there's no threshold, and it's all on one floor."

Hamilton also noted that on-street parking is readily available. Democratic County Board member Steve Beckett pointed out that all the parking spaces have parking meters. He said free parking is one reason the Illini Union would have been a better spot.

"I knew one of the things said over at the (Illini) Union was, there was going to be free parking in the circle drive," Beckett said. "I was very disappointed about that."

Beckett also complained that about dim lighting, which he said could pose difficulties for older voters like him. Hamilton said that so far, voters in their 30s or above have been in the majority at the Campus Early Voting Center, which exists because of a state law aimed at encouraging student voting. Shelden says he plans to follow up on a letter to Gregory Place development, requesting free parking spaces at the site, and will install additional lighting. He also hopes to see the U of I promote the site,

"I hope the university will send e-mails out to people - they've done that in the past," said Shelden. "Maybe the student government group (the UI Student Senate) that was talking about how much money they were willing to spend on promoting early voting at the union - it would be nice if they would spend some of that money promoting early voting over here."

All Champaign County voters are welcome to vote early at either the campus Early Voting Center, at 700 South Gregory Street in Urbana, or at the Champaign County Clerk's office in the Brookens Center, 1776 East Washington Street in Urbana, through October 28th. Both locations are open weekdays from 8 AM to 4:30 PM, and Saturdays and Sundays from 9 AM to noon.

(Photo by Jim Meadows/WILL)

Categories: Government, Politics

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