Illinois Public Media News

AP - Illinois Public Media News - January 05, 2011

Judge: Rahm Emanuel to Stay on Ballot

A Cook County judge says Rahm Emanuel is eligible to run for Chicago mayor, but the ballot dispute involving the ex-White House chief of staff isn't over yet.

Circuit Court Judge Mark Ballard heard arguments for a bit less than an hour Tuesday morning in a Daley Center courtroom just steps from city hall.

The anti-Emanuel legal team claimed the candidate gave up his residency when he rented out his Chicago house while working for President Obama in Washington. Lawyers for Emanuel argued he left only to serve his country, and always planned to return.

In a written opinion, Ballard sided with Emanuel, upholding a decision last month by the Chicago Board of Election Commissioners.

"We find there was sufficient evidence to support the Board's conclusion that Candidate Emanuel intended to remain a Chicago resident during his temporary absence, and did not, therefore, abandon his Chicago residency," Ballard wrote.

Burt Odelson, an attorney for the objectors, told reporters he expected to lose in circuit court. Oldeson said he will appeal the ruling on Wednesday.

"Those of us who practice election law, we don't look at these as losses. They're just stepping stones to get to the appellate and [state] supreme court," Odelson said.

Emanuel attorney Kevin Forde said "at some point" Odelson has "to call it quits."

"He's lost before a hearing officer," Forde said. "He's lost before three [election board] commissioners - all of whom are very, very familiar with the election law. He's lost before a very experienced judge here."

The legal challenges could drag on for weeks, complicating things for city election officials who, by the end of the month, must prepare ballots for early voting.

Meantime, Odelson declined to provide specifics about who was paying for the lengthy ballot battle.

"Well, for me it's been very expensive. Very time-consuming and very expensive," he said.

Odelson said he is getting paid by the two people officially listed as "objectors" in his filings, Walter P. Maksym, Jr., and Thomas L. McMahon. But when asked if anyone else is chipping in to pay the bills, Odelson told reporters it was none of their business.

"It's my business who's paying me," he said. "Just like it's your business who pays you."

Odelson is not required to publicly report how much he is being paid for the Emanuel challenge. But the Emanuel campaign is required to disclose its bills, though one of its lawyers, Mike Kasper, said he has not done the math.

"I've been busy on the case, I will say that," Kasper said.

(Photo by Bill Healy/IPR)

Categories: Government, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - January 04, 2011

Proposed Change in Champaign County Zoning Rules Could Help Wilber Hts Homeowners

Residents of the Wilber Heights subdivision are barred by zoning rules from making major house repairs and renovations, because the area is zoned for industry, not homes. Now, the Champaign County Zoning Board of Appeals will consider a change in zoning rules that would allow work on such "non-conforming dwellings" to go ahead.

The proposal was put together at the county board's request by Planning and Zoning Director John Hall. County Board member Stan James (R-Rantoul) said allowing major work on the non-conforming houses will provide relief for the remaining homeowners in Wilber Heights.

"And John's trying to provide some relief so those folks now there can add on and enjoy the homes they do have, with the knowledge that it may come down in the future that even by doing that, it's not going to increase their value much," James said. "Because if it stays Light Industrial, eventually all that will be bought up."

Under the proposal, non-conforming dwellings in Wilber Heights and other parts of the county could receive major repairs and even be enlarged. Garages and other accessory buildings could also be enlarged. Currently, repairs and renovations are barred if they take up more then 10 percent of a building's total area. James said he thinks the residents may be entitled to additional compensation, but believes the zoning change is a good start.

Wilber Heights is located east of the Market Place Mall, in an unincorporated area just outside of the city of Champaign. It contains a mix of industrial and residential development. First built as housing for employees of the nearby Clifford-Jacobs Forging Company plant, Wilber Heights was rezoned all industrial by the Champaign County Board in 1973, with the assumption that the homes would eventually be torn down. But dozens of them are still occupied today.

County Board member James said he thinks the residents of Wilber Heights may be entitled to additional compensation for the burden placed on them by the 1973 zoning change. But he said the proposal to allow greater home repairs and renovation is a good start.

The proposed change in zoning rules will get its first hearing before the Champaign County Zoning Board of Appeals on at its regular meeting, Thursday, January 6th, beginning at 6:30 PM, at the Brookens Center in Urbana. Planning & Zoning Director Hall says he hopes the measure can receive county board approval this spring.

Categories: Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - January 04, 2011

Il. Democrats Edging Towards Vote on Tax Increase

Illinois Democrats edged closer to a vote on raising income taxes during a lame-duck session of the state Legislature, as the governor met with legislative leaders Tuesday and lawmakers considered measures that would put new restrictions on state spending.

Senate President John Cullerton, D-Chicago, said Democratic leaders want the House to approve a version of the tax increase that passed in the Senate nearly two years ago. That plan would boost the personal income tax rate to 5 percent, from the current 3 percent.

Meanwhile, a new report from a University of Illinois think tank concludes that the state's budget crisis is even deeper than most people realize. The deficit is usually placed at $12 billion with a possibility that it will reach $15 billion, but the Institute of Government and Public Affairs says the shortfall is really $17 billion and climbing.

"It is hard to overstate the depth of the fiscal hole the state is in," the report said. "If nothing is done soon, the state of Illinois faces a very bleak future."

Cullerton and House Speaker Michael Madigan, D-Chicago, want some Republican support for a tax increase. That would help insulate Democrats from the potential public outcry over higher taxes. So far, however, Republican leaders have opposed any tax talk.

Democrats are pushing several measures that might help attract GOP support and blunt public criticism.

Madigan, for instance, is sponsoring two constitutional amendments. One would limit government spending growth to the same level of growth that Illinois taxpayers see in their own paychecks. The other would make it harder for state and local government to approve costly benefit increases in pension plans.

Both amendments have been approved in committee and now await action on the House floor.

Democrats also are trying to reach deals on Medicaid costs, school management and worker's compensation.

Together, the measures could be used to argue that Democrats are serious about handling tax money more responsibly if an increase is approved.

"I think what we have to do is pay our bills," Cullerton told reporters after meeting with Madigan and Gov. Pat Quinn. "I think we have to make sure our bond rating is improved and people see that, going forward, we can pay our bills. If people look at it from that perspective, I think it's something that they would accept."

A new Legislature will be sworn in Jan. 12. It may be easier to pass a tax increase before then, while Democrats still have a large majority and some outgoing members can act without worrying about a future voter backlash.

Democratic leaders, however, won't say whether they're prepared to try to pass a tax during the lame-duck session if they can't pick up any Republican support.

A spokeswoman said House Republican Leader Tom Cross met with the governor Tuesday morning and Quinn discussed raising income taxes by just half a percentage point and using that revenue to pay off $14 billion in new debt. Spokeswoman Sara Wojcicki said Quinn offered few details and that Cross reiterated his calls for government spending reforms before considering higher taxes.

There was little evidence Tuesday to suggest that Democrats and Republicans were coming to any accord.

The governor and Democratic leaders did not include top Republicans in their meeting. Republicans opposed Madigan's constitutional amendments to control spending, arguing either that they don't go far enough or they go too far. And a Senate committee voted along party lines to borrow roughly $4 billion and use the money to make the state's annual contribution to government pensions.

Categories: Economics, Government, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - January 03, 2011

Longtime Newspaper Columnist Retires After Nearly 60 Years

A longtime columnist for The News-Gazette has left the paper after nearly 60 years.

Malcolm Nygren, a former minister with Champaign's First Presbyterian Church, joined the Gazette in 1953 along with about a half dozen other ministers recruited by the paper. Each of the ministers quit after writing a single column, but Nygren stuck around.

Nygren's columns often described different aspects of his life through the lens of the Christian faith. He said his editorials were never overtly religious, but reflected his feelings about major events ranging from the assassination of President John F. Kennedy to the birth of his daughters. He added that many of his columns could be read and interpreted on multiple levels.

"For some people it came at a time in their life when it was something they really needed, and it was useful for them," Nygren said. "It means different things to different people."

The Gazette's opinions editor Jim Dey was the first person each week to read over the column. He praised Nygren for always meeting a deadline, and writing in clear language that rarely required an edit.

"Writers come and go, and newspapers hopefully are here for the duration, and so people will get used to it," Dey said. "Nothing good lasts forever, and (Malcolm) Nygren's column is an example of that."

Dey said the News Gazette has no immediate plans to replace the column.

In his final editorial, Nygren wrote, "For the writer, it is a lot better to quit before you have to quit." But Nygren said he is not give up writing just yet. Readers can still follow his columns on his blog, "Byline: Malcolm Nygren."

"I will write when I want to, not on a deadline," Nygren said. "I'll get the good part of the job, and not have to have the pressure of it."

(Photo courtesy of Malcolm Nygren)


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - January 03, 2011

UI Flash Index: More Economic Growth in December, Even Without the Jobs

The economy may still be slowly improving in Illinois, but the author of a monthly gauge of the state's economic performance says it's far from healthy.

For the seventh consecutive month, the University of Illinois Flash Index went up. In December, the index measured 94.9, up .7 from November, but 100 is the break-even point between growth and contraction, and economist Fred Giertz said the slow growth has not been very noticeable.

Giertz said unemployment remains a problem, even though the state's jobless rate is slightly under the national average -- a rare occurrence.

"It may just be an aberration, or it may be that our industries, especially agriculture, are doing fairly well," Giertz said. "Some of the exporting industries are doing alright, and we were not really devastated by the crisis with real estate or things of that sort."

Giertz is also not too concerned that Illinois or the nation will see a return of inflation in the near term. Rising commodity prices, bailout legislation and the Federal Reserve's decision to enact "quantitative easing" have prompted some to warn of an effect on overall consumer prices. But Giertz does not detect any unwillingness in financial markets to lend money at the current very-low interest rates.

"The fact that people ware willing to lend money for the long term at relatively low interest rates suggests that people don't think there's going to be a lot inflation on the horizon," Giertz said. "The Federal Reserve is very wary of the possibility (of inflation). They've made mistakes in the past and I think their intention is to start reining things in once the economy gets going again."

Giertz said there is some good news in the weak Flash Index numbers. He said revenue from sales taxes was up in December, marking a better holiday shopping season than many retailers had expected. The Index uses revenue reports from state income, sales and business taxes to calculate its measurement.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - January 03, 2011

Recycling Firm Steps Up After Champaign Closes Recycling Drop Off Site

A garbage hauling and recycling firm has expanded its recycling drop off site on the north edge of Champaign, following the closing last week of the city's recycling drop off facility.

Illini Recycling owner Cindy Eaglen said she has expanded her intake capacity to serve the out-of-town users who had come to depend on the city of Champaign's drop off site.

"We've had a drop off site out here for many years, and just felt that there was a need to expand it, because so many people were going to be left with nothing to do with their material," Eaglen explained.

Another company, Green Purpose, is planning to open a new recycling drop off facility that would operate on a subscription basis. But Eaglen said they do not have to charge their users, because they already have the equipment in place to process the recyclables.

"Everything that we have is already in place," Eaglen said. "So basically, what we're doing is just adding additional material to it, which does not increase our cost, as if we were having to go out and buy all the equipment."

Eaglen said the success of her expanded drop off site will depend on whether the public can sort their recyclables according to their guidelines. She said they can accept most common paper, aluminum and plastic recyclables, but she said they cannot accept garbage, Styrofoam, plastic grocery bags, or toys and other plastic items that don't carry a recycling symbol.

Illini Recycling performs garbage and/or recycling pickup in Champaign, Danville, and several surrounding communities.

Eaglen said the company's public recycling drop off site is open weekdays from 8 to 5, at the Illini Recycling facility at 420 Paul Street, in the Wilbur Heights neighborhood just off North Market Street, near the Market Place Mall. There has no charge to drop off recyclables at the site.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - January 03, 2011

New Board of Higher Ed Administrator Says Coming to Illinois Just Made Sense

The man now assigned with overseeing Illinois' colleges and universities says the change in jobs was a perfect fit for many reasons.

Before starting last week as Executive Director of the state Board of Higher Education, George Reid had just completed a kind of post-secondary blueprint for Maryland as part of that state's Higher Education Commission. And Reid says this new job will borrow from his background as both an administrator and an educator.

Illinois Public Media's Jeff Bossert talked with Reid about the challenges that await him:

(Photo Courtesy of Illinois Board of Higher Education)

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Categories: Education, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - December 30, 2010

Quinn Signs New Pension Law, Daley Disappointed

Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn has signed legislation affecting the pension system for law enforcement officers and firefighters.

Quinn signed the law Thursday. His office says it will stabilize pension systems and protect retirement benefits for the officers and firefighters. However Chicago Mayor Richard Daley says he's disappointed Quinn signed the law, saying it will burden Chicago taxpayers.

The new law will affect those hired on or after Jan. 1. Quinn's office also says it will help municipalities fund pensions.

Daley's office says the new law will increase the city's annual police and fire pension contribution from an projected $309 million in 2015 to about $856 million. The new law normalizes retirement ages, sets a maximum pension and begins monthly cost-of-living adjustments at age 60 for retirees and survivors.

Categories: Economics, Government, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - December 29, 2010

Virginia Theatre’s Next Renovations Likely to be Put Off Until 2012

Champaign's Virginia Theatre re-opens this week after six months of privately funded work to the lobby and concession stand.

The downtown facility has yet to use $500,000 in state grant dollars for plaster work and theater lighting. But Champaign Park District spokeswoman Laura Auteberry said that work is expected to take longer, likely about eight months. With movie showings and concerts now scheduled into May, Auteberry said the park district will likely postpone closing the Virginia again until 2012. The schedule includes Roger Ebert's 13th Annual Film Festival.

Auteberry said lots of changes have already taken place since July, including paint and plaster work, a new concession stand, lighting, and carpeting extending into the upper lobby. The decision to move the state grant-funded work to will officially be made at the next park district board meeting Jan. 12. Auteberry said that is also when the board hopes to approve the design for a new marquee on the theater, after reviewing options from a sign company.

"They're going to be looking at redesigned designs, that Wagner (Electric Sign Company) has prepared, and hopefully deciding on a final design," Auteberry said. "Once we get a final design done, I don't think it will take them long to put it up."

The Virginia has been without a marquee the last several weeks. The park district board voted last summer to replace the sign with one resembling the 1921 original, despite complaints from local preservationists. The old vaudeville house re-opens Friday night for the annual Chorale concert. The park district also hopes to schedule an open house in February to show off recent upgrades.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - December 29, 2010

Shutdown of Champaign Recycling Site Puts Some Out-of-Towners in a Bind

The city of Champaign's recycling drop off site on Kenyon Road is scheduled to shut down for good on Thursday, Dec. 30, at 2:30 PM. That's bad news for residents from outside the city who have been using the facility for years.

Champaign is closing the recycling drop off site because a new program for apartment buildings means recycling pickup is now available to all residents. Landlord pay a per-unit user fee for the recycling collection program that's been dubbed "Feed the Thing". Another program requiring garbage haulers to include curbside recycling pickup for single-family homes and smaller apartment buildings has been in place in Champaign for years.

Landlords and/or residents pay for recycling pickup in Champaign, but the city's recycling drop off facility has always been offered to the public free of charge. Champaign operations manager Tom Schuh said the site was costing the city $12,500 a month in recent years.

"It's never been free," Schuh said. "Unfortunately, recycling materials, the value of those materials just doesn't cover the cost of operating either a drop-off site or any other recycling program."

Whatever the cost, the city recycling drop off facility was popular with many out-of-town residents. And with its closing, Champaign County Regional Planning Commission recycling coordinator, Susan Monte, said those users will be at a disadvantage.

"It will be a very missed drop-off site," Monte said. "Lots of people that lived in rural areas did use that site, and they are now searching for an alternative."

One alternative could be a new drop-off facility that a Champaign-based startup company hopes to open, not far from the city drop off site. If the city approves a zoning change, CEO Steven Rosenberg of Green Purpose LLC said users would pay a $5 monthly fee to drop off recyclables, and he said the facility would also promote the company's strategy of re-purposing

"You'll be able to drop off things that maybe aren't recyclable at all," Rosenberg said. "Lightly used materials that are able to be reused, and even though specific people don't have a use for them anymore, other people might."

According to Monte, most Champaign County residents have access to recycling services. Curbside pickup is available in Champaign, Urbana, Rantoul, Savoy, Mahomet, St. Joseph and Tolono. In addition, Tolono, Homer, Philo and Ogden will continue to operate their own drop off facilities for their local residents. But Monte said 14 rural communities in Champaign County have no recycling service at all. She said some counties, including Macon County, rely on tipping fees from their landfill to fund county-wide recycling programs. Champaign County no longer has an active landfill.


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