Illinois Public Media News

AP - Illinois Public Media News - January 14, 2010

Quinn’s State of the State Address Has Little to Say on State Budget

Illinois Governor Pat Quinn used his first traditional "State of the State" address Wednesday to highlight his record...push again for more tax revenue...and salute veterans.

The one hour 12 minute speech included references to Abe Lincoln, Martin Luther King, Paul Simon - two Roosevelts and a tribute to Secretary of State Jesse White.

Quinn struck his usual populist tone, noting he uses his VIP card at a discount hotel chain, and lobbying for a constitutional amendment to let voters put ethics reforms on the ballot.

"Democracy is a process that goes on year after year", said Quinn, "and it's very important that we bring the people in to our democracy and let them set the rules for our conduct and our behaviors.

Quinn didn't talk directly about the state's deep budget problems until more than 45 minutes into his speech. The governor said he's cut the budget ... but argued that Illinois needs to raise taxes.

"Now I do believe we need more revenue", said Quinn. "I think after cutting all the costs, after using strategic borrowing, after getting as much money as we can get from the federal government, we're still short."

But that was all Quinn said about state finances.

The campaign of Comptroller Dan Hynes, Quinn's opponent in next month's primary election, released a statement calling the speech a - quote - "rambling and unfocused performance" that lacked "concrete plans."

Republican candidates for governor were uniformly critical. One of them, State Senator Bill Brady of Bloomington said Quinn is sending an anti-business message.

"He knows he's wrong, but it's in his DNA to do exactly the wrong thing --- he knows he shouldn't be talking about it", said Brady. "I can gurantee you there are thousands of business leaders that are saying right now, 'wait a second, this guy's scaring me.'"

Among other east-central Illinois lawmakers, Democratic State Representative Naomi Jakobsson of Urbana was the most supportive. In an audio news release sent out by the Illinois House Speaker's office, Jakobsson said the governor gave a "pretty good review" of how much progress Illinois has made in the year since he took office.

"He talked about a lot of the things that we were able to accomplish, and I often do that too", said Jakobsson. "It's good to remind people that we can work together, we do things together, both sides of the aisle, and we get some good things done."

State Senator Dale Righter, a Mattoon Republican, said Quinn talked only in "broad strokes" about the budget deficit, and has failed to consider cuts proposed by the Republican miniority.

"The governing party here in Illinois doesn't want to take ahold of the reins, and do something we all know is responsible, because that would potentially be politically unpopular", said Righter.

Democrat State Senator Mike Frerichs of Champaign, said he wanted to hear more specifics about the budget --- and hoped they would be forthcoming in the governor's budget address. Frerichs says quick action is needed to solve the state's budget crisis.

"I'm hopeful we do something this Spring", said Frerichs, "because quite frankly, I don't see how we make it through next November, when some people say we'll deal with those issues, without defaulting on a lot of our promises.

Categories: Government, Politics


AP - Illinois Public Media News - January 13, 2010

Quinn to Deliver State of the State Address Wednesday Jan. 13th at 12 PM—Live Coverage on AM 580

Illinois Governor Pat Quinn delivers his State of the State Address, Wednesday, January 13th, at 12 noon. WILL-AM will broadcast Illinois Public Radio's live coverage of the speech before state lawmakers in the House chamber of the Illinois Statehouse in Springfield.

Barbara Flynn Curie is a fellow Democrat in the Illinois House. She says she still supports the governor's call for an income tax hike to reduce the state's multi-billion dollar

"I do think that it's critical if we want to maintain services for the vulnerable, people who are our responsibility, we really have to do the job", says Flynn Curie.

Curie says she thinks the governor should blame the state's dire financial situation on the global recession rather than over-spending on the part of lawmakers.

Meantime - the top Republican in the Illinois House, Minority Leader Tom Cross, says there's more room for cuts in the state budget - before lawmakers talk about raising taxes. Cross says the economy is the biggest issue facing the state..And he thinks there are better ways to improve the state's bottom line than Governor Quinn's plan to raise the income tax.

"I think the governor and many of his colleagues on his side of the aisle, the income tax hike is the easy way to address some of these issues", says Cross. "The tough issues are the issues of reform."

Cross says the state should look to make budget cuts before raising taxes. He says that would save money - and help lure businesses into Illinois.

Categories: Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - January 13, 2010

Champaign City Council Endorses Updated Police Use of Force Policy

Changes made in the wake of the Kiwane Carrington shooting are now part of the Champaign Police Department's Use of Force policy and procedure. The Champaign City Council endorsed the revisions last (Tuesday) night.

The updated policy now spells out the combination of circumstances that must be in place before an officer may use deadly force on a citizen --- involving cases where a person has harmed, or is threatening to harm the officer or another person, or is threatening to use a deadly weapon to escape.

The police department's Taser policy is also clarified. New language makes it clear that Champaign Police do not use Tasers, but may call in other agencies with Tasers when they feel they are needed. Police Chief R-T Finney says even then, Taser use is limited, according to the situation.

"We had a situation where we needed to use a Taser", says Finney. "(The) agency came; the situation changed in terms of the person who was barricaded was utilizing some volatile chemicals in the house. And we opted not to use the Taser at that point. So, you know, we still have that control."

The changes to police policy come after 15 year old Kiwane Carrington was shot to death during a struggle with a Champaign officer last October. The shooting led to renewed charges that Champaign Police do not treat African-Americans fairly --- and pledges from the city council to improve police/community relations.

The changes were not enough for eight people who addressed the city council last night. They included Terry Townsend, who said the changes were only incremental, and failed to address deeper problems with relations between police and the African-American community.

"It is imperative that we do something to take the confrontational nature out of police community relations" Townsend told the city council. "And having these policies that you just can't make major changes because of constitutional or state law ... that you tweak ... that's not going to make the issue go away."

Some council members said they thought more needed to be done as well. District One Councilman Will Kyles says he saw frustration among both police and community members who did not believe that change was possible.

"That's the root of the problem", said Kyles. "That's what I want to work on --- not just having a discussion, but really helping, not only the community but the officers believe that things are going to change. Because right now, I don't think in my heart that people thing that."

Kyles called for more positive engagement between the Champaign Police Department and the community - including with some of the department's harshest critics.

City Manager Steve Carter said the revisions to the Use Of Force Policy may not address all problems, but were a step forward. Police Chief Finney says he doesn't think the policy needs any further tweaking. He says there are other police policies to address other concerns.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - January 12, 2010

U of I Coaches May Not Have To Take Furlough Days

It's still unclear whether coaches like Bruce Weber, Ron Zook and other athletic staff would have to take mandated furlough days announced by the University of Illinois last week.

Intercollegiate Athletics spokesman Kent Brown says Athletic Director Ron Guenther is working with the department's legal counsel to quickly find an answer. Coaches may be exempt since their contracted salaries aren't paid with state funds, relying instead on ticket sales, corporate sponsors, donations, and media rights. But Brown says Guenther and the coaches under him are ready to honor whatever's decided.

"Ron's understanding is we would follow along with the furlough program as it's stated," says Brown. "The only question so far has been how does that affect some of the guaranteed contracts that are a little differently written than the normal academic professional contract." Brown says time is of the essence for basketball coach Bruce Weber, who's either coaching or recruiting seven days a week right now. But Weber said after a recent game that he would participate in the furloughs. Football Coach Ron Zook has been out of town and hasn't commented on the policy.

If the coaches did have to take furlough days, Brown says the amount of money given back to the U of I would be based on their base salaries of around $400,000, not the promotional appearances and other events that allow them to earn around $1.5 million a year.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - January 12, 2010

More Work to be Done on AYP, Say Champaign Unit 4 Administrators

The annual district report card for the Champaign School District shows that Unit Four beat the statewide average in areas like the graduation rate and ACT scores. But the district failed to achieve Adequate Yearly Progress under the No Child Left Behind Act.

The report card shows the district falling short mostly with reading scores for blacks, Hispanics, the economically disadvantaged and students with disabilities.

Deputy Superintendant Dorland Norris says teachers are increasing their efforts to help at-risk children.

"We're wrapping around those students," Norris said. "They're getting good classroom instruction, and then they're getting support from literacy specialists, coaches or interventionists, and whatever support we can pull in to wrap around all of the students that are struggling learners."

But Norris notes that federal standards for making Adequate Yearly Progress go up every year --- from 62.5% in 2008 to 70% in 2009 --- and with even higher levels in years to come. Last year, eight of Unit Four's 16 schools reported problems in making Adequate Yearly Progress. Norris says of that group, all but Booker T. Washington School is a first-timer. She says the other seven --- including both high schools --- were placed on the list for the first time, because of rising AYP standards.

Unit Four's annual report card is available online, at the school district's website, www.champaignschools.org. The district report card was formally presented to the school board Monday night.

Categories: Education, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - January 12, 2010

UI Leaders Forecast Drastic Changes Without Budget Help

Furlough days could be just the beginning of the changes ahead at the University of Illinois. Two top university leaders say the next few years could see a host of changes, as the U of I adjusts to diminishing state funding.

Interim Urbana campus chancellor Robert Easter says the state's budget crisis has forced U of I administrators to start looking at how they can maintain the integrity of the institution in the long-term, considering the financial problems they're facing. He says university officials are starting to hold conversations they haven't had for some time.

"Those conversations are around what are we really about, what are our key programs that we want to have as a part of our future. What do we want to look like in 20 years?" Easter said. "And how do we decide those things that we no longer do? They may have been important at some time in the past, they may still be important. But what are our priorities?"

Easter says he'll be meeting with deans and vice-chancellors on the Urbana campus this Friday to start work on designing the framework for those conversations. While their outcome is unknown, U of I interim president Stanley Ikenberry says he envisions a U of I five years from now with the same number of faculty or more, but with fewer non-teaching and administrative staff.

Ikenberry and Easter made their comments Monday night during a live interview on WILL Radio and TV.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - January 11, 2010

Internal CPD Investigation into Carrington Death Gets Underway

As Champaign City Council members consider changes to the police department's use-of-force policy, an internal review is getting underway into last fall's police shooting death.

15 year old Kiwane Carrington was shot and killed as he and Officer Daniel Norbits were scuffling during a report of a break in at a Vine Street house. Police chief RT Finney had also responded and was slightly injured controlling another juvenile.

Champaign city manager Steve Carter is in charge of the internal investigation - he'll be assisted by two people outside city government - retired Urbana police chief Eddie Adair and retired McLean County judge John Freese.

Adair says their investigation will review the state police report into the shooting incident but won't change the outcome of that report, which led to a state's attorney's decision not to file charges.

"This is of an internal focus, looking at the training practices of the department and its policies and procedures as it relates to those only," Adair said.

Tomorrow night the Champaign City Council looks at proposed changes to the police department's use of force policy. City officials want to clarify for officers the right times to use lethal force.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - January 08, 2010

Quinn says he didn’t ask details of early release inmates who went back to prison

Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn says he didn't know why 48 inmates released early were back in prison when he talked about them last week -- and he didn't ask.

Quinn stopped a secret early release program known as MGT Push and announced that 48 of 1,700 inmates set free early were back behind bars because they violated parole rules.

The Associated Press found that at least 17 violated parole by committing violent crimes like attempted murder and armed robbery.

Quinn said Friday he never asked Corrections officials what the violations were.

The Democrat wouldn't say whether the public should have known about the crimes. He says he stopped the plan quickly and is reforming the prison agency.

Quinn was at an unrelated event in the Chicago suburb of Matteson.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - January 06, 2010

Legislative Panel Endorses Sale of Thomson Prison to House Guantanamo Detainees

Gov. Pat Quinn and Sen. Dick Durbin are applauding the s recommendation of a panel of Illinois lawmakers to close a state prison so that it can be sold to the federal government.

In a statement, the Democrats say that selling Thomson Correctional Center to the U.S. to house Guantanamo Bay detainees shouldn't be a political or partisan issue. They say it should be about "doing what's right for our troops, for our national security and for the people of Illinois.''

The Illinois Commission on Government Forecasting and Accountability voted 7-4 Wednesday to accept a recommendation to close Thomson.

Only Republicans ... like Bloomington Sen. Bill Brady ... cast "no" votes. Brady, who's running for governor, says Quinn has botched programs to release Illinois prisoners early. He says it shows Illinois needs Thomson to house the state's own inmates. He points to an estimate that shows it may cost 350 million dollars to build a prison like Thomson today.

"But yet, our governor in all the great negotiating skills that he has, indicated he'd be thrilled if he could get 120 to 150 million dollars", said Brady. "This is something we can ill afford to give the federal government. We're not only giving them a way out on terrorists. We're giving them a facility for half of what it would cost them to build today."

Other Republicans on the Commission casting "no" votes were Rep. Patti Bellock, Sen. Mike Murphy and Rep. Raymond Poe. Two Republicans voted for the Thomson prison sale --- Rep. and Co-Chairman Rich Myers and Sen. Dave Syverson. The Commission's five Democrats all voted "yes" --- they are Sen. Mike Frerichs of Champaign, along with Rep. Al Riley, Sen. and Co-Chairman Jeff Schoenburg, Sen. Donne Trotter and Rep. Elaine Nekritz.

The vote by the bipartisan committee is nonbinding, and Quinn already has said he plans to sell the prison. The sale could be completed as early as the spring.

(Additional reporting by Illinois Public Radio)


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