Illinois Public Media News

AP - Illinois Public Media News - January 12, 2010

U of I Coaches May Not Have To Take Furlough Days

It's still unclear whether coaches like Bruce Weber, Ron Zook and other athletic staff would have to take mandated furlough days announced by the University of Illinois last week.

Intercollegiate Athletics spokesman Kent Brown says Athletic Director Ron Guenther is working with the department's legal counsel to quickly find an answer. Coaches may be exempt since their contracted salaries aren't paid with state funds, relying instead on ticket sales, corporate sponsors, donations, and media rights. But Brown says Guenther and the coaches under him are ready to honor whatever's decided.

"Ron's understanding is we would follow along with the furlough program as it's stated," says Brown. "The only question so far has been how does that affect some of the guaranteed contracts that are a little differently written than the normal academic professional contract." Brown says time is of the essence for basketball coach Bruce Weber, who's either coaching or recruiting seven days a week right now. But Weber said after a recent game that he would participate in the furloughs. Football Coach Ron Zook has been out of town and hasn't commented on the policy.

If the coaches did have to take furlough days, Brown says the amount of money given back to the U of I would be based on their base salaries of around $400,000, not the promotional appearances and other events that allow them to earn around $1.5 million a year.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - January 12, 2010

More Work to be Done on AYP, Say Champaign Unit 4 Administrators

The annual district report card for the Champaign School District shows that Unit Four beat the statewide average in areas like the graduation rate and ACT scores. But the district failed to achieve Adequate Yearly Progress under the No Child Left Behind Act.

The report card shows the district falling short mostly with reading scores for blacks, Hispanics, the economically disadvantaged and students with disabilities.

Deputy Superintendant Dorland Norris says teachers are increasing their efforts to help at-risk children.

"We're wrapping around those students," Norris said. "They're getting good classroom instruction, and then they're getting support from literacy specialists, coaches or interventionists, and whatever support we can pull in to wrap around all of the students that are struggling learners."

But Norris notes that federal standards for making Adequate Yearly Progress go up every year --- from 62.5% in 2008 to 70% in 2009 --- and with even higher levels in years to come. Last year, eight of Unit Four's 16 schools reported problems in making Adequate Yearly Progress. Norris says of that group, all but Booker T. Washington School is a first-timer. She says the other seven --- including both high schools --- were placed on the list for the first time, because of rising AYP standards.

Unit Four's annual report card is available online, at the school district's website, www.champaignschools.org. The district report card was formally presented to the school board Monday night.

Categories: Education, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - January 12, 2010

UI Leaders Forecast Drastic Changes Without Budget Help

Furlough days could be just the beginning of the changes ahead at the University of Illinois. Two top university leaders say the next few years could see a host of changes, as the U of I adjusts to diminishing state funding.

Interim Urbana campus chancellor Robert Easter says the state's budget crisis has forced U of I administrators to start looking at how they can maintain the integrity of the institution in the long-term, considering the financial problems they're facing. He says university officials are starting to hold conversations they haven't had for some time.

"Those conversations are around what are we really about, what are our key programs that we want to have as a part of our future. What do we want to look like in 20 years?" Easter said. "And how do we decide those things that we no longer do? They may have been important at some time in the past, they may still be important. But what are our priorities?"

Easter says he'll be meeting with deans and vice-chancellors on the Urbana campus this Friday to start work on designing the framework for those conversations. While their outcome is unknown, U of I interim president Stanley Ikenberry says he envisions a U of I five years from now with the same number of faculty or more, but with fewer non-teaching and administrative staff.

Ikenberry and Easter made their comments Monday night during a live interview on WILL Radio and TV.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - January 11, 2010

Internal CPD Investigation into Carrington Death Gets Underway

As Champaign City Council members consider changes to the police department's use-of-force policy, an internal review is getting underway into last fall's police shooting death.

15 year old Kiwane Carrington was shot and killed as he and Officer Daniel Norbits were scuffling during a report of a break in at a Vine Street house. Police chief RT Finney had also responded and was slightly injured controlling another juvenile.

Champaign city manager Steve Carter is in charge of the internal investigation - he'll be assisted by two people outside city government - retired Urbana police chief Eddie Adair and retired McLean County judge John Freese.

Adair says their investigation will review the state police report into the shooting incident but won't change the outcome of that report, which led to a state's attorney's decision not to file charges.

"This is of an internal focus, looking at the training practices of the department and its policies and procedures as it relates to those only," Adair said.

Tomorrow night the Champaign City Council looks at proposed changes to the police department's use of force policy. City officials want to clarify for officers the right times to use lethal force.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - January 08, 2010

Quinn says he didn’t ask details of early release inmates who went back to prison

Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn says he didn't know why 48 inmates released early were back in prison when he talked about them last week -- and he didn't ask.

Quinn stopped a secret early release program known as MGT Push and announced that 48 of 1,700 inmates set free early were back behind bars because they violated parole rules.

The Associated Press found that at least 17 violated parole by committing violent crimes like attempted murder and armed robbery.

Quinn said Friday he never asked Corrections officials what the violations were.

The Democrat wouldn't say whether the public should have known about the crimes. He says he stopped the plan quickly and is reforming the prison agency.

Quinn was at an unrelated event in the Chicago suburb of Matteson.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - January 06, 2010

Legislative Panel Endorses Sale of Thomson Prison to House Guantanamo Detainees

Gov. Pat Quinn and Sen. Dick Durbin are applauding the s recommendation of a panel of Illinois lawmakers to close a state prison so that it can be sold to the federal government.

In a statement, the Democrats say that selling Thomson Correctional Center to the U.S. to house Guantanamo Bay detainees shouldn't be a political or partisan issue. They say it should be about "doing what's right for our troops, for our national security and for the people of Illinois.''

The Illinois Commission on Government Forecasting and Accountability voted 7-4 Wednesday to accept a recommendation to close Thomson.

Only Republicans ... like Bloomington Sen. Bill Brady ... cast "no" votes. Brady, who's running for governor, says Quinn has botched programs to release Illinois prisoners early. He says it shows Illinois needs Thomson to house the state's own inmates. He points to an estimate that shows it may cost 350 million dollars to build a prison like Thomson today.

"But yet, our governor in all the great negotiating skills that he has, indicated he'd be thrilled if he could get 120 to 150 million dollars", said Brady. "This is something we can ill afford to give the federal government. We're not only giving them a way out on terrorists. We're giving them a facility for half of what it would cost them to build today."

Other Republicans on the Commission casting "no" votes were Rep. Patti Bellock, Sen. Mike Murphy and Rep. Raymond Poe. Two Republicans voted for the Thomson prison sale --- Rep. and Co-Chairman Rich Myers and Sen. Dave Syverson. The Commission's five Democrats all voted "yes" --- they are Sen. Mike Frerichs of Champaign, along with Rep. Al Riley, Sen. and Co-Chairman Jeff Schoenburg, Sen. Donne Trotter and Rep. Elaine Nekritz.

The vote by the bipartisan committee is nonbinding, and Quinn already has said he plans to sell the prison. The sale could be completed as early as the spring.

(Additional reporting by Illinois Public Radio)


AP - Illinois Public Media News - January 06, 2010

Champaign City Council Endorses New Christie Clinic at Curtis Road Interchange

Work could begin this spring on a new Christie Clinic facility in southwest Champaign. The Champaign City Council endorsed the project at its study session Tuesday night. It will be the first development to go up at the I-57 Curtis Road interchange.

Champaign Council members are welcoming the Christie Clinic project, even though it doesn't quite fit the zoning guidelines being developed for the Curtis Road Interchange area --- guidelines meant to avoid the strip-mall look of the North Prospect shopping district. Despite the discrepancy, council members decided that the Christie project is an important one that will get development started in the area.

But Councilman Tom Bruno says he expects the proposed zoning guidelines to still apply to all future development at the Curtis Road Interchange.

"Because a catalyist is a good idea for the area", says Bruno, "I'm willing to go along with these exceptions. But a future developer would be sorely mistaken if he thought my acquiescence to the Christie project would indicate that this is a starting point for somehow chipping away at the concept we have in mind out here."

Another reason the council supports the project --- Christie officials say that once it's built, they can start work on a major renovation to their downtown Champaign clinic.

The new clinic at the Curtis Road Interchange takes the place of Christie's ill-fated Clearview project, which was planned but never built at I-57 and I-74. Phase One will have 60-thousand square feet of floor space --- with future expansions planned up to 200-thousand square feet.

The Champaign City Council will take a final vote on an annexation agreement for the new Christie Clinic site next month.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - January 05, 2010

Furloughs, Budget Cuts, Hiring and Wage Freezes Face UI Employees

About 11-thousand University of Illinois employees will have to take four unpaid days off work between now and the middle of May.

U of I administrators say furlough days have become unavoidable as the university faces a 440 million dollar shortfall in state funding. Administrators say the state has given the U of I only seven percent of the support it expected from this year's budget.

Interim president Stanley Ikenberry says no layoffs have been ordered, but departments are being asked to consider them because of a grim immediate future.

"Next year is not any more comforting," Ikenberry said. "So I think until we see the state leadership -- the governor, the leaders and members of the General Assembly, and frankly the citizens of the state -- rallying around a long term solution, I think we're going to be dealing with a mounting financial crisis."

Ikenberry believes the state will need to cut state spending and increase taxes to dig itself out of its budget deficit.

Chief financial officer Walter Knorr says the U of I has borrowed millions of dollars from its own funds - he says money from tuition, federal support and private giving have also kept the university going. "And indeed it's these other areas of the university that are giving us the liquidity that we require to be able to cope with the shortfall in funding from the state," Knorr said.

The four-day furloughs announced today do not affect civil service employees, but Knorr says their bargaining groups will be asked to put similar actions into their contracts. About 100 top administrators will take ten furlough days over the next five months.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - January 05, 2010

Quinn Names Chicago Alderman Flores to Chair ICC

Gov. Pat Quinn has named Chicago Alderman Manny Flores as the new chairman of the Illinois Commerce Commission.

Quinn announced the appointment Monday at a news conference in Chicago, calling Flores hard working and diligent. The governor says Flores will have a "strong voice'' for consumers and focus on green initiatives. The ICC determines utility rates in Illinois.

Flores says he's humbled and honored by the appointment, and he calls it a "new challenge.'' Flores replaces Charles Box, whose term was to expire in January 2009. Box is the former mayor of Rockford.

The consumer advocacy group Citizens Utility Board calls Flores' appointment "good news'' and say he's "proven to be a strong, independent, and fair voice for consumers.

Categories: Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - January 05, 2010

U of I Flash Index Shows Slight Improvement for Third Month

December was another month of slow economic improvement for Illinois --- according to the University of Illinois Flash Index.

The Flash Index increased by a fifth of a point, to 91.2 in December, from November's 90.0. U of I Economist Fred Giertz says the Index has been gradually going up since hitting a low of 90 in September.

"There has been now three months of small increases", says Giertz. "So it's good news in a very limited sense --- good news in the sense that things aren't getting worse, but it doesn't necessarily mean there's a lot of improvement."

Giertz says he thinks slow economic growth will continue in Illinois, provided there are no unforeseen reversals, but says it will take a couple of years for the Flash Index to reach 100, which would indicate the start of actual economic growth.

"I think the evidence suggests that we are on the path to recovery", says Giertz. "But the recovery's going to be pretty slow. But there's not guarantee about that. There could be some unforeseen circumstance or some reversal. We've certainly seen that in the last couple of years."

Giertz says the best-case scenario would be a healthier financial sector combining with renewed public confidence in the economy to create a snowball effect. But he thinks gradual sluggish improvements are more likely.

The Flash Index is based on corporate, personal income and sales tax receipts in Illinois. Despite the recent improvement, all three categories are down from a year ago.


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