Illinois Public Media News

AP - Illinois Public Media News - September 23, 2011

VA Health Center in Danville Alerts Vets About Privacy Breach

A veterans health center in Danville has alerted more than 500 veterans of a breach involving their personal information that puts them at risk for identity theft.

The Commercial News in Danville reports an appointment book from the VA Illiana Health Care System has been missing since July 14.

The appointment book included veterans' last names and last four digits of their Social Security numbers.

Illiana director Michael Hamilton says there's no reason to believe the information has been misused or stolen. He says the VA is alerting veterans so they can take precautions against identity theft.

Precautions include requesting a free credit report and placing a "fraud alert'' on credit accounts.

Hamilton says VA staff members are reviewing policies and procedures in hopes of preventing future breaches.

Categories: Criminal Justice, Health
Tags: crime, health

AP - Illinois Public Media News - September 20, 2011

Cook County Man Dies from West Nile Virus

Illinois health officials say a Cook County man has become the first person this year to die after contracting the West Nile virus.

The Illinois Department of Public Health said Tuesday that the man was in his 60s and had underlying health conditions. He was diagnosed with the virus in August and died earlier this month.

Officials say eight human cases of West Nile virus have been reported in Illinois this summer. The first two were reported Aug. 19 - involving a Cook County man in his 80s and a Franklin County man in his 30s.

The virus is transmitted by mosquitoes that pick up the virus after feeding on infected birds.

Symptoms include fever, nausea, headache and muscle aches - though most people will show no symptoms at all.

Categories: Health
Tags: health

AP - Illinois Public Media News - September 20, 2011

Latinos Make Up Largest Minority Group in Illinois

U.S. Census figures show Hispanics are now Illinois' largest minority group, outnumbering African Americans. But not all communities are welcoming the trend, according to a professor a the University of Illinois.

Hispanics now make up nearly 16 percent of the state's population, an increase of nearly 500,000 people from a decade ago. The shift in demographics has put an emphasis on immigration issues such as housing and educational opportunities for Latinos and Latinas.

Jorge Chapa teaches Government and Public Affairs at the U of I, and he also co-authored the book "Apple Pie and Enchiladas: Latino Newcomers in the Rural Midwest."

"They are growing much more quickly than the capacity and the knowledge and how to serve them," Chapa said.

Chapa said very few Hispanics serve on local school boards or in other administrative roles. He said there are also communication barriers in medical care and schools. In addition to growth in Chicago and the collar counties, Illinois' Cass County has seen an influx in Latinos since the last census.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - September 19, 2011

Champaign County to Discuss Publicizing Restaurant Inspections

Champaign County to Discuss Publicizing Restaurant Inspections

A Champaign County Board member says he will push for a new rule requiring restaurants in the county to post their health inspection scores.

Categories: Government, Health, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - September 16, 2011

Health Officials Probe Illness Tied to Cantaloupe

State and local health officials are investigating an outbreak of a serious infection caused by eating a kind of cantaloupe grown in Colorado that was shipped to Illinois and 16 other states.

The Illinois Department of Health says at least 20 people across the U.S. have become ill after eating cantaloupes contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes bacteria, two of whom have died.

There have been reports of possible Listeria cases in Illinois, including some in Cook County, but the health department says none of those have been confirmed.

The confirmed cases have been linked to what are called Rocky Ford cantaloupes shipped by Jensen Farms in Colorado.

The health department is working with the Centers of Disease Control, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and local health departments in Illinois.

Categories: Health
Tags: health

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - September 12, 2011

Eatery Inspection Reports Are Tough to Get

Listen at 10:06 am on Tuesday to WILL-AM 580's "Focus" for a call-in program with area health officials.

About one in 10 restaurants in Champaign County failed a health inspection from April 2007 through April 2011, according to a review of inspection records by CU-CitizenAccess.org.

But customers have no easy way of knowing just how sanitary the places at which they eat really are.

Take, for example, Geovanti's Bar & Grill, which failed public health inspections five times from September 2008 through February of this year.

But no one who eats there would ever know, unless they requested copies of the Campustown restaurant's inspection reports from the local public health district.

That's because - unlike many other counties and cities in central Illinois and across the country - the Champaign-Urbana Public Health District currently doesn't publicize the results of its restaurant inspections in any form. Not online, not on placards at restaurants and not in local newspapers.

This means the public has no way way of knowing about health-code violations, such as the live and dead cockroaches found during a November 2009 inspection at Geovanti's.

Owner Anthony Donato said the restaurant works closely with the district to make sure it meets health codes. Geovanti's recently had a voluntary health inspection and passed with flying colors, he said.

Julie Pryde, the district's public health administrator, said the fact that a restaurant is open for business shows eating there is safe.

"If you go into a restaurant and it's open, we've been in there, and they've passed," Pryde said. "And there are times where you'll go to a restaurant, and it will not be open. It may not say, 'Closed by the health department' on the front door, but if it's not open, that's because there's an immediate health risk."

Pryde and other public health officials have long said they want to make information about inspections of the county's more than 1,000 eating establishments more available to the public. They believe providing diners with access to complete restaurant inspection reports will give them the information they need to make the best decisions for their health.

But, after years of talk, they still have not done so.

Since getting new software to manage inspection reports in 2007, they have spoken about plans for a website that would allow consumers to look up the records online.

In 2008, environmental health director Jim Roberts said he hoped to have the site up the following year.

This spring, he said they were shooting for September. In late August, he revised the time line once again.

"I would hope by January 2012," Roberts said.

He said there are several reasons for the delays.

"First, we had to make sure the system was working as we wanted it to," Roberts said. "The second thing is that I don't have a project manager to do this, so I do this as time permits me to do so."

Meanwhile, since 2003, neighboring Vermilion County has taken the low-tech route of requiring restaurant owners to post letter grades from their most recent inspections in their establishments alongside their health permits.

Douglas Toole is the environmental health director in Vermilion County.

"It's a lot about informing the public," Toole said. "When they go into a restaurant, the public can see the dining area, certainly, and they can see what the restrooms look like and they can see, depending on the place, a small amount of the food-preparation or food-storage area. But a lot of it takes place behind the scenes."

While Vermilion County officials see this as a way of providing the public with information they're entitled to see under the state's Freedom of Information Act, Champaign-Urbana's Julie Pryde see the letter grades differently.

"It's completely worthless," Pryde said.

She said when people see a letter grade, they don't bother to find out what went into earning that grade.

"If you only are looking at one thing, A, I think it will give people a false sense of security, and, B, it might negatively impact a restaurant's business when there's no point in it," Pryde said."Give them all the information or no information at all."

Illinois law doesn't require health departments to publish inspection results online or in hardcopy. But Vermillion isn't the only area county the takes the initiative to make its scores public.

McLean, Macon and Sangamon counties all post inspections scores on their websites.

Manny Martinez is executive chef of Destihl Restaurant and Brew Works, which has locations in Champaign and Normal. Inspection scores for the Normal restaurant are posted on the McLean County Health Department website.

The scores can be deceiving because they don't tell customers whether a restaurant lost points for major violations or for several minor violations that might have little to do with sanitation, Martinez said.

But overall, he doesn't mind the information being available to the public.

"For a restaurant, it doesn't really matter to us, as long as we know we're doing a good job, and we get inspected and we're doing a great job," he said.

How to Obtain a Restaurant Inspection Report

The public can obtain copies inspection reports for specific restaurants by calling the Champaign-Urbana Public Health District's Environmental Health Division at (217) 373-7900, emailing eh@c-uphd.org or visiting the district's offices at 201 W. Kenyon Road, Champaign.

Depending on the number of reports being sought, you may be asked to file a Freedom of Information request with one of the district's Freedom of Information officers:

Patricia Robison

Freedom of Information Officer

Address: 201 W. Kenyon Road

Champaign, IL 61820

Phone: (217) 531-4257

Fax: (217) 531-4343

Email: probinson@c-uphd.org

Tammy Hamilton

Deputy Freedom of Information Officer

Address: 201 W. Kenyon Road

Champaign, IL 61820

Phone: (217) 531-2905

Fax: (217) 373-7905

Email: thamilton@c-uphd.org

Linda Smith

Deputy Freedom of Information Officer

Address: 201 W. Kenyon Road Champaign, IL 61820

Phone: (217) 531-4265

Fax: (217) 531-4343

Email: lsmith@c-uphd.org

Categories: Business, Health

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - September 12, 2011

Eatery Inspection Reports Are Tough to Get

About one in 10 restaurants in Champaign County failed a health inspection from April 2007 through April 2011, according to a review of inspection records by CU-CitizenAccess.org. But customers have no easy way of knowing just how sanitary the places at which they eat really are. Dan Petrella reports.

(With additional reporting by University of Illinois journalism alumna Jennifer Wheeler, CU-CitizenAccess reporter Pam Dempsey and UI journalism alumnus Steve Contorno)

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Categories: Business, Economics, Health

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - September 06, 2011

Community Elements Will Explore Detox Program of its Own

The head of Champaign-based Community Elements says she's looking for a more 'holistic' approach to behavioral health, and that could include a possible detox program of its own for drug addicts.

Urbana's Prairie Center Health Systems closed its detox program on Thursday, after state cuts of $450,000. Community Elements CEO Sheila Ferguson Ferguson admits state funding is thin. But she said there are exceptions, including Community Elements' Respite Crisis Center, which is performing better and could receive additional state support.

"We're really giving some thought to whether or not we can serve some people with dual diagnosis that need detox," Ferguson said. "Because we hate to leave the community without anything. So, we're kind of brainstorming at this point to see if there's something that we can still partner with Prairie Center because they have some outpatient services."

Ferguson also said it is possible Community Elements could partner with local hospitals to make sure some sort of detox program continues in the area. She said she was disappointed with the decision by Prairie Center Health Systems to end talks about a possible merger. That agency's CEO, Bruce Suardini, said it wasn't feasible now, given state funding mechanisms. Ferguson said such a move is needed given the condition of state funding.

"Become more integrated, and offer mental health, substance abuse, and primary care,'" she said. "For me, mental health and substance abuse are really primary care issues that need to be addressed through physician support as well as ancillary services, like outpatient therapy counseling."

She said she also disagrees with Suardini's comments about merger negotiations, saying a number of mental health and substance abuse agencies have now chosen to join forces.

Categories: Government, Health, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - September 02, 2011

Prairie Center Loses State Funding for Detox Center

An Urbana agency that treats victims of drug and alcohol abuse has again lost funding for its detox program, and this time it may be for good.

Prairie Center Health Systems CEO Bruce Suardini said it is doubtful the $450,000 will be restored by lawmakers this fall. In September of 2008, the program shut down for six months before funds were reinstated.

Suardini said the detox program still sees about 750 people per year, and after cutting off referrals Thursday night, he said more addicts won't get the appropriate treatment.

"We watch the clients carefully because it's life-threatening," he said. "So a lot of people who will now probably end up in an ER room will get treated for the day and released. And they really don't have a chance to look at the addiction and get into a long-term care kind of way to combat that addiction."

Cuts to those programs statewide equal 28-million dollars. Suardini says while a number of area legislators would back a supplemental bill to restore that money this fall, it would require 3/5ths majority in each chamber.

"The chances of that happening, and total money being restored in the state of Illinois - I'm just more pessimistic about that because of the volume of things that are on the (General) Assembly's plate," he said. "So I don't see that coming back."

But Suardini said other programs for residential care and outpatient clinics, including one in Danville, will continue to operate. But he said reduced staffing levels means clients will have to be put on a waiting list.

Meanwhile, Suardini said Prairie Center has ended talks with Community Elements in Champaign (formerly the Mental Health Center of Champaign County) about a potential merger. He said state funding mechanisms forced clients to use services separately, and a merger wasn't feasible at this time.

Community Elements CEO Sheila Ferguson says the decision was solely Prairie Center's, and was disappointed the two sides couldn't work something out.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - August 29, 2011

Le Roy Doctor Running for Ill. Senate’s 51st District

A physician from McLean County says his career away from politics should serve as an advantage as he pursues a seat in the Illinois Senate.

Republican Tom Pliura of Le Roy is running in the re-drawn 51st district, consisting of mostly rural towns in ten east central Illinois counties. He will face current state representative Chapin Rose in the primary.

Pluira said having real world experience as both an emergency room doctor and a lawyer will help hold elected officials accountable. He said his campaign won't be about personal attacks, but it will upset the status quo.

"I am going to challenge some long-standing, long held, positions by both sides, and inevitably, that will probably invoke a defensive posture on both sides of the aisle," Pluira said. "I'm not afraid to do that."

A doctor for 25 years, Pliura says he's seen many patients lately carrying cards for both Blue Cross-Blue Shield as well as Medicaid, but only the latter is billed. He says that's putting an unfair burden on the Medicaid rolls.

"There's no ability for the state to check that," said Pliura. "To see if that individual who now qualifies for Medicaid because the state has loosened up and basically tripled the rolls. The state's now paying a bill when in fact Blue Cross Blue Shield got the premium for that insurance policy. We're going to stop that."

Pluira said Illinois needs to rein in spending rather than raise taxes to solve the budget crisis. The emergency room physician also says he'll push to make the state friendlier to small businesses, as well as for term limits in the legislature. Pliura has never run for public office, but if elected, he said he will serve no more than two terms.


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