Illinois Public Media News

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - November 14, 2011

Champaign County Coalition Working to Cut Down on Diabetes

Different health care groups that recently formed a coalition determined to fight diabetes in Champaign County met Monday as part of a diabetes expo.

Coalition member Martha Paap said about seven percent of 18-to-64 year olds in Champaign County have type 2 diabetes. That translates to more than 11,000 people. Paap, who heads Provena's Center for Healthy Aging, said while that is slightly lower than the national average, she worries that number will rise.

"The kind of consequences to diabetes can be very, very serious such as heart disease, stroke, blindness, lower limb amputations, kidney problems," Paap said. "It can be a very devastating disease that we really need to prevent."

Theresa Truelove, a nurse with the Champaign-Urbana Public Health District, said many of these cases represent African Americans, Asians, and Hispanics, who moved to the United States from another country, and are adjusting to changes in their lifestyle.

"They go from potentially field work to office work or no work," Truelove said. "You've got the whole change of the activity levels of people as they come into our society, and that is in a way deadly for diabetes."

Some of the preventative measures to reduce the chances of diabetes include changes in diet and more physical activity. According to the International Diabetes Federation, at least one in 10 adults could have diabetes by 2030.

Categories: Health
Tags: health

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - November 09, 2011

Christie Clinic and PersonalCare Reach Limited Contract Agreement

Champaign-based Christie Clinic and health insurance provider PersonalCare have agreed to a contract that ends a dispute that went public six weeks ago. But the agreement still requires most customers to find another insurer --- or other doctors --- beginning Jan. 1, 2012.

The new contract will cover Christie patients covered by PersonalCare's Medicare Advantage plan, and its self-funded payor insurance products. But it will not cover any plans for state employees or retirees. And the new contract leaves out any of PersonalCare's HMO, Preferred Provider or Point-of-Sale plans for other Christie patients.

The new contract comes after a dispute in which PersonalCare told Christie Clinic in September it was ending its contract with the medical clinic. The health insurer later said the move was only a step towards new contract negotiations. But Christie officials didn't see it that way, and announced their contract with PersonalCare was over, for most purposes. The dispute added to the confusion already caused by the state's reshuffling of state employee health care packages.

Categories: Health

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - November 08, 2011

New Champaign Co. Nursing Home Admin Outlines Goals

(Editor's note: CU-CitizenAccess.org is taking an in-depth look at nursing homes in Central Illinois. Earlier this week, we sat down with Chuck Schuette, the new administrator for the Champaign County Nursing Home to discuss his plans to tackle the challenges facing the county's nursing home (see interview below). For more on this project and interactive tools you can use to evaluate nursing homes in your area, tune in to Illinois Public Media or visit CU-CitizenAccess.org on Monday, Dec. 5. Want to be part of the project or have a story to share about a nursing home experience in East Central Illinois? Contact reporters Dan Petrella or Pam G. Dempsey)

For Effingham native Chuck Schuette, running a nursing home has always been the plan.

So when he saw the chance to oversee a nursing home, he took it.

Schuette, the new Champaign County Nursing Home administrator, started his new job Oct. 31. He replaced Andrew Buffenbarger, who served as the County Nursing Home administrator since 2004.

Schuette, 59, worked as the chief nursing officer for 24 years at St. Anthony's Memorial Hospital in Effingham.

"Coming from an acute-care background, I did get some experience, because at the hospital we developed a skilled-care unit and in regards to that, I went and got my long-term care nursing home license (in 1995)," he said. "I kept it all these years with the idea that one day I would go into long-term care."

Schuette has his work cut out for him.

Like other nursing homes in the area, the Champaign County Nursing Home has faced several challenges in recent years: late payments from the state, numerous complaint investigations by the Illinois Department of Public Health and difficulty in managing staff retention.

The nursing home is also rated overall two out of five stars on a federal Medicare compare site (see http://www.medicare.gov/NHCompare). The overall federal rating is a combination of the health inspection rating, the staffing rating, and the quality measures rating.

A little more than three years ago, the Champaign County Board contracted with Management Performance Associates, a St. Louis-based firm, to provide day-to-day management oversight for the operation of the nursing home, said Deb Busey, Champaign County administrator.

Since the contract began in 2008, the nursing home's finances improved, as had its patient count, county officials said. The County Board renewed its contract with the management firm in June.

Buffenbarger is moving to a new position within Management Performance Associates.

Schuette (pronounced shoot-y) said that while this is his first job heading a nursing home, "I am excited, enthused and happy to be here."

"The big difference in acute care is you only see the patients three or four days max," he said," and here people are here for the rest of their lives, for many cases. That is really an advantage. You really get to know the people and know the families and it's kind of a community."

In the transition from acute care to long-term care, Schuette said the largest "culture shock" comes from the delay in state reimbursement payments.

"It should be fine, but it's scary," Schuette said. "I think about it constantly, 'Are you going to have enough money?' "

But with other nursing homes facing similar pressure, "somehow they get through it, and I'm going to learn how they get through it over the next few months."

His to-do list is long. One of his priorities includes bolstering the nursing staff.

"Nurses just aren't being valued for what they really are and what they can offer people, and I want to try and make sure that is sensed here and the nurses feel that here and hopefully nurses will say, 'This is where we want to work,' " Schuette said.

The staffing level at the nursing home is "higher than what is required for regulatory compliance," he said, and he hopes to keep it that way.

"We're maintaining that and keeping it at a higher level of staffing," Schuette said. "Will we then be forced to go down to minimum regulatory standards? I'm getting the sense we won't have to go in that direction. ... We'll probably never drop down to minimum staffing levels."

Resident safety is another priority.

"We want to make sure we endeavor to be regulatory compliant," he said. "This is a heavily regulated industry and for good reason, it needs to be that way. We're talking about the safety of our residents. I want to really work on that, to make sure that each and every time we are surveyed, that we are actually reducing the number of tags and that we are really spending a lot of time making sure we are in compliance and our residents are safe."

Schuette has spent the past 10 days settling into the job and says he'll develop more goals and strategies over the next three months.

"I think we have the things here to do it and do it well," he said. "It's going to take leadership ... my real job is trying to be a leader and motivate people to a higher performance. That's what I hope to do."

(Produced by Sean Powers/WILL)


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - November 08, 2011

New Dental Clinic Dedicated in Champaign

A ribbon cutting ceremony was held Tuesday in Champaign to mark the opening of a new dental clinic for low-income, uninsured, and Medicaid eligible patients.

Located at the Francis Nelson Health Center, the 1,000 square-foot clinic seeks to treat about 2,500 people within the next year. Nancy Greenwalt is the director of Smile Healthy, a community-based initiative to provide dental care to the undeserved. She said in addition to having a dentist, three full-time dental assistants, and two part-time hygienists on staff, the clinic also has volunteer translators who speak both Spanish and English.

"Dental care is a procedure, and the patients need to understand what's going on - payment, contact information," said Greenwalt, who noted that up to 40 percent of the patients at the Francis Nelson Health Center speak Spanish. "It's just not possible without the translation services."

Smile Healthy operates another program that provides dental care for children. According to the United Way of Champaign County, that program has over 200 additional children waiting for care. All are 200 percent of the poverty level or below, and most are on Medicaid.

United Way President Lyn Jones said the clinic is needed more than ever.

"There are people who are missing work because of dental problems, causing extreme pain," Jones said. "This really will improve the overall health of citizens in Champaign County."

According to the United Way, at the time when the Francis Nelson dental clinic opened on Oct. 17, about a thousand people were on a waiting list for cavity fillings, teeth extraction, and other dental care.

More than half a million dollars in donations were used to start up the clinic, and the United Way of Champaign County hopes to raise approximately $50,000 to sustain dental services.

The cost of using the clinic's services will be determined on a sliding scale based on a person's income. Medicare does not cover dental costs.

The clinic is open Monday through Thursday from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. at 819 Bloomington Road in Champaign.

Other Champaign County groups offering dental service to low-income people include the Champaign County Christian Health Center, Champaign County Healthcare Consumers, Champaign-Urbana Public Health District, and the Parkland College Dental Hygiene Program.

(Photo by Sean Powers/WILL)

Categories: Economics, Health

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - November 08, 2011

New Champaign Co. Nursing Home Admin Outlines Goals

Like other nursing homes, the Champaign County Nursing Home has faced delays in state payments, numerous complaint investigations and trouble with staff retention. The Champaign County board hired a management firm to address these problems in 2008, and a week ago a new administrator stepped in at the nursing home. Effingham native Chuck Schuette replaced former administrator Andrew Buffenbarger, who took another position within the management firm. Schuette spoke with CU-CitizenAccess reporter Pam Dempsey about his plans for the job.

(Photo by Sean Powers/WILL)

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WILL - Illinois Public Media News - October 28, 2011

New Records Show More Restaurant Inspection Failures

New Records Show More Restaurant Inspection Failures

(Reported by Dan Petrella of CU-CitizenAccess)

When public health officials conducted a routine inspection of Quizno's in Urbana last month, they discovered 12 critical health-code violations.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - October 27, 2011

Frerichs Says Bill on New Group Health Plans Still Alive

NOTE: This story was updated and expanded on 10/27/11.

State Sen. Mike Frerichs (D-Champaign) says he is disappointed that his bill to nullify the new group health insurance plans for state workers and retirees failed to survive a gubernatorial veto on Wednesday.

Senators failed to override the veto on a vote of 28-to-28, with Senate President John Cullerton voting Present. But Frerichs said the fight against what he sees as an inferior package of health plans isn't over yet.

"We're not done fighting, and this is a speed bump, it's not a roadblock," Frerichs said. "We still have a very good case going through the courts. And we still have time, because we extended contracts through June 30, to work on a solution in the spring session."

Frerichs was referring to the contract extensions of existing health plans --- including those from Urbana-based Health Alliance. They are meant to give time for the dispute over the health plans to play out. Frerichs' legislation would have gone further, canceling the new health plans entirely and starting the process of approving new contracts all over again --- but taking oversight of the procurement process to the Department of Healthcare and Family Services, and returning it to the Illinois Department of Central Management Services.

Frerichs also says he hasn't entirely given up on reaching a compromise with Governor Pat Quinn, despite his veto of the bill.

"The governor made fairly clear that he was opposed to this bill", says Frerichs. "But he did leave open the possibility of some sort of negotiations. So I'm going to listen to him, see if there's some sort of compromise that we can reach. If we can't though, we're prepared to go forward and try again."

Frerichs charges the Quinn administration with working to switch votes in the Senate on his bill, which passed the chamber 37 to 12 in May

The new health insurance plans announced by the Quinn administration last April drew criticism because they replaced existing health plans --- such as those from Health Alliance --- with ones not generally available in many counties or with certain physician groups --- such as Carle, which owns Health Alliance, and has an exclusive contract with them.

Categories: Government, Health, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - October 26, 2011

Tests for Lysteria Lead To Recall of Two Sandwich Lines By Landshire

A company that supplies sandwiches to convenience stores, supermarkets and other outlets, is recalling two of its products, because they may be contaminated with Listeria.

St Louis-based Landshire Incorporated is recalling its Nike All-American and Nike Super Poor Boy sandwiches, after two samples from the company's plant in Caseyville tested positive for Listeria. The Illinois Department of Public Health says the sandwiches were made between Aug. 25 and Oct. 6. The Public Health Department says neither they nor Landshire have received any reports of confirmed illnesses due to the sandwiches.

Public Health officials say that Listeria symptoms vary, but can be serious and sometimes fatal in young children, pregnant women, the elderly and other with weakened immune symptoms. The symptoms can include fever, muscle aches, severe headaches and stiffness, abdominal pain and diarrhea. In pregnant women, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages or stillbirths.

If you've bought one of the sandwiches, you can return them to the place of purchase for a refund. They're identified by specific production lot codes affected by the recall range from 11 237 6 through 11 285 6. The codes can be found on the side or back of the individual packaged sandwich.

If you have questions about the sandwiches, you should contact Landshire at 314-925-4009.

Categories: Government, Health, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - October 21, 2011

Indiana, Planned Parenthood Back in Court

The state of Indiana is trying to reinstate its controversial law banning Medicaid funds from going to Planned Parenthood of Indiana and other health agencies that provide abortions.

The state's lawyers Thursday went before a three-judge panel of the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals at the Dirksen Federal Building in Chicago. Last June, a federal judge in Indianapolis approved a preliminary injunction reinstating Medicaid funds to Planned Parenthood that had been cut off after Indiana passed its anti-abortion law. That legislation is now being mimicked by other conservative-leaning states.

"I think it's going to have some significant impact. Certainly, if our arguments don't prevail, that may put a damper on what other states want to do," said Indiana Solicitor General Thomas M. Fisher. "But if we prevail, it could have some national significance."

At issue is whether Indiana has a right to alter qualifications concerning which health care providers can or can't receive Medicaid, funding that is used to provide health care to low-income people.

In the spring, the Indiana General Assembly approved a measure to prevent Medicaid funds going to any health provider that also performs abortions. The law was drafted broadly, but is seen to be directly aimed at Planned Parenthood of Indiana.

Indiana's own Legislative Services Agency warned lawmakers that the rule change may violate federal law, a position that's also taken by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Fisher says Indiana is still in the right.

"Under the Medicaid Act, the states have the authority to set the qualifications for Medicaid providers. The argument from Planned Parenthood has been that we are not allowed to reduce patient choices," Fisher said. "We think the law is on our side that - just because one provider (Planned Parenthood) may not continue being a Medicaid provider - that itself is not a fatal reduction in patient choice. There are over 800 other providers where Planned Parenthood has clinics. That still leaves plenty of choice for patients."

Indiana Civil Liberties Union attorney Ken Falk is defending Planned Parenthood. He disagrees with the state's stance.

"This has been couched, I believe, as an abortion issue. But really it's an issue of the state asserting a right that it simply doesn't have to determine provider qualification," Falk said. "The state next year could decide what else can be made a provider qualification. The point is that the state can regulate matters which have some impact on Medicaid. This is not that type of qualification."

Judge Diane Sykes asked Falk if Planned Parenthood would be willing to separate the organization, basically dividing its health services from its abortion services, as the state of Indiana has suggested.

"It's not clear if that can occur under the current statute in Indiana," Falk said. "Freedom of choice belongs to the recipient of Medicaid."

Fisher said the whole issue is really up to Planned Parenthood.

"Planned Parenthood can make the choice itself on whether it wants to be a Medicaid provider or an abortion provider. It's not exactly the case that the statute itself commands any provider to go out of business," Fisher said. "Planned Parenthood makes that choice. The law is on our side. Reducing the range of choices by one? That doesn't mean the law is invalid."

A temporary injunction has barred Indiana from fully implementing its ban on Medicaid funds from going to Planned Parenthood.

The state faces another complication, in that it must also appear before an administrative law judge with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. That hearing will address some of the same issues taken up by the federal courts. That hearing takes place Dec. 15 in Chicago.

Categories: Government, Health, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - October 19, 2011

Study: 1 in 25 Teens Taking Antidepressants

Health officials say roughly 1 in 25 adolescents in the United States are taking antidepressants.

A new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is the first to offer statistics on how many kids ages 12 to 17 take antidepressants.

It's based on surveys and depression screenings of about 12,000 Americans.

The study found about 1 in 10 adults take antidepressants.

And perhaps more should - the researchers said only one third of people with depression symptoms in the study were taking medication.

The CDC report was released Wednesday. It also found that women take the drugs more than men, and whites use them more than blacks or Mexican-Americans.

Categories: Health, Science

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