Illinois Public Media News

AP - Illinois Public Media News - September 08, 2010

U.S. Senate Candidate Hears from Veterans in Urbana

The democrat running for President Barack Obama's old U.S. Senate seat pledged to increased veterans benefits during a campaign stop in Urbana.

U.S. Senate candidate Alexi Giannoulias was joined by U.S. Senator Dick Durbin (D-IL) and Assistant U.S. Secretary of Veterans' Affairs Tammy Duckworth.

Gulf War veteran Jason Wheeler of Champaign expressed his frustration to the that he cannot get proper medical care because of federal regulations.

Wheeler was preparing to ship out to Iraq in 2002, but just weeks before he was set to leave the U.S., he jumped out of a helicopter as part of a training exercise, and crash landed on a tarmac. His parachute did not work.

"I have no feeling from both of my knees down. From my hands to my elbows, they feel like they're on fire," he said.

Because Wheeler's injuries occurred on American soil, he said he does not get the same quality of federal care that veterans get when they are injured overseas. He can still get treated through the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, but since he was wounded on American soil, Wheeler is ineligible for TRICARE assistance, a program through the Department of Defense.

"I got injured, and I could use a lift for my vehicle," he said. "I could use these little things that can help you out, and a gentleman like myself can't get this help. So, we don't want to let that happen to the next guy."

Duckworth said historic progress has been made in the last few years by the democratically-led congress to raise veterans' benefits, but she stated that there just is not enough money to go around to provide the same level of care for all wounded veterans.

"It all goes back to the money," she said. "We've got to dedicate the money and resources to take care of all of our vets."

Wheeler spoke to Duckworth after the forum, and he said her office will look into his medical claims.

During the forum, Duckworth also touted the efforts of democratic U.S. Senate candidate Alexi Giannoulias in pushing for Illinois veterans to have access to affordable mortgages, and helping start a scholarship program for children of soldiers killed in action. Giannoulias would not give a deadline of when he hopes American troops should begin to pull out of Afghanistan, but he said the attention in Washington should be on fixing the nation's economy, improving infrastructure projects, and bolstering education programs.

The state treasurer is in a tight race against Congressman Mark Kirk (R-IL), who released a statement ahead of the forum in which he outlined his support of the Post-9/11 G.I. Bill.

Kirk helped write the resolution authorizing the 2003 invasion into Iraq. After speaking with veterans, Giannoulias blasted Kirk for misleading the public leading up to the war. He noted Kirk's false statements that former Iraqi president Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction. Giannoulias said Kirk showed a lack of judgment for supporting a war that cost thousands of American lives and billions of taxpayer dollars.

The Kirk campaign pointed out members of congress in both parties made that claim.

A recent Chicago Tribune poll showed Kirk and Giannoulias neck-and-neck with 34 percent of support among voters, followed by the Green Party's LeAlan Jones with six percent, Libertarian Mike Labno with 3 percent, and 22 percent of voters stating that they are undecided.

(Photo by Sean Powers/WILL)


AP - Illinois Public Media News - September 03, 2010

Lawmakers Push for Immigration Law in Illinois

A proposal that will be introduced later this fall in the Illinois House of Representatives seeks to put an immigration law similar to the one passed in Arizona on the books.

State representative Bill Mitchell (R-Forsyth) is co-sponsoring the measure with Republican Randy Ramey (R-Carol Stream). Mitchell said a centerpiece to the measure would cut Medicaid services to people who are not U.S. citizens by modifying the Illinois All Kids program, which provides health coverage for children regardless of immigration status.

"We're spending millions of dollars on health care for illegals," said Mitchell. "It's time to say enough is enough."

Illinois is just one of nine states that offers Medicaid to undocumented immigrants. According to the Illinois Department of Healthcare and Family Services, 1.6 million children are covered under the All Kids program, and a little more than three percent of those covered are undocumented.

"If you're going to do something in which you specifically target children, and make it so that they're not eligible for certain services and accesses, that's not only cruel and heartless, it's just absolutely mind-boggling," said Linus Chan, a staff attorney at the Asylum & Immigration Law Clinic at DePaul University. "That's not going to solve the problem of undocumented immigration."

Mitchell said with a $13 billion budget deficit, Illinois is in no shape to be offering health care services to people living in the country illegally. He said an influx of undocumented immigrants coming to the state are weighing down on the number of available jobs, and contributing to higher taxes going to support education and health care services.

He added that the legislation will also create more stringent regulations for employers who hire undocumented workers, and include language allowing law enforcement officials to ask for someone's paperwork when a "reasonable suspicion exists that a person is here illegally." Mitchell noted that the color of a person's skin would not qualify as a "reasonable suspicion."

Chan said he is worried pushing people out of the state could have dire consequences on Illinois' economy. He took note of a 2006 study released by the Texas comptroller's office, which indicates that eliminating illegal immigration could reduce that state's workforce, personal income, and gross state product.

Mitchell said the legislation will be introduced in November. Since Arizona passed its controversial law in April, other states have considered similar proposals, including Indiana, Missouri, Colorado, Nebraska, Oklahoma, and Texas.

(Photo courtesy of mk30/flickr)


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - August 31, 2010

U of I Researcher Says Infants Should Eat Salmon

Adults are advised to eat fish a couple of times a week, and University of Illinois professor Susan Brewer of the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition says parents should start feeding salmon to their infant children. Brewer spoke with Illinois Public Media's Sean Powers about a new baby food she helped develop with salmon as the key ingredient.

(Photo by Sean Powers/WILL)

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Categories: Environment, Health

AP - Illinois Public Media News - August 26, 2010

Outbreak of Stomach Ailments in Tuscola Shows Signs of Weakening

A wave of illnesses that hit dozens of students in Tuscola may be on its way out.

The superintendent in the Tuscola school district says about 36 students missed school today at North Ward Elementary School, though not all of them were affected by the stomach ailment that sent about 70 students home yesterday.

James Voyles says another ten new cases were reported today, but no students were sent home from school during the day. Douglas County Health Department officials are waiting for test results to determine what caused the stomach pains, vomiting and diarrhea in the students.

Categories: Health
Tags: health

AP - Illinois Public Media News - August 25, 2010

UI Food Science Expert: Eggs, Chickens in Iowa Salmonella Scare Can Be Eaten

The Iowa farms whose eggs have been recalled in a Salmonella outbreak aren't saying yet what will become of their hens, but it's possible they'll wind up becoming meat for soup or other products.

Food safety experts like Bruce Chassy of the University of Illinois say there's no reason for the eggs or the meat not to be eaten as long as they're thoroughly cooked to kill any Salmonella bacteria.

The farms say they're already sending the eggs to be pasteurized and sold as a liquid product. Pasteurization should kill most if not all of the Salmonella.

Wright County Egg Farms and Hillandale Farms are the two Iowa egg producers that have recalled more than a half-billion eggs.

Both companies say they're waiting to hear from the Food and Drug Administration before deciding what, if anything, to do with their hens.

Categories: Government, Health, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - August 25, 2010

Vermilion County Health Department Aims to End Friday Furloughs by October

The administrator of the Vermilion County Health Department said she hopes finances will allow her staff to return to a 5-day a week schedule in just over month.

Shirley Hicks said the Friday furlough days that started in June haven't reduced the volume of work. A lack of state funds forced the department to become a minimum certified facility that month, offering a handful of services, including immunizations, emergency planning, and the Women, Infants, and Children or WIC program. But Hicks said the department still has the same clients in those areas, noting the work has not been furloughed.

"High-risk restaurants - they need inspection three times a year," said Hicks. "Can you do all of those kinds of things? And what are doing on complaint calls? How effectively can you go out and respond to issues of communicable disease if you're not available three of seven days?"

At issue is continued budget problems caused by cash flow from the state. Hicks said in addition to that backlog of about $400,000, her department still owes Vermilion County for roughly half of a $300,000 loan made last year. County Board Chairman Jim McMahon said the county will help the department if it keeps the 4-day schedule, but not with a 5-day a week plan. McMahon said the funds that have come back from the state have led Hicks to believe that the health department can resume a normal work week in about six weeks.

"I don't share the same confidence, but at the same time, you have to let managers be managers," said McMahon. "So if you make that decision and go back to five days, basically what you're saying is you no longer would need the county board's help. So if you're saying that, you're back to five days - everybody's happy."

McMahon said if county decided to stick with the 4-day a week schedule, the county will provide 'whatever means necessary' to maintain a minimum certified health department to maintain services like immunizations and restaurant inspections.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - August 25, 2010

Stomach Ailments Send Home More than 70 Tuscola Grade School Students

A school in Tuscola will be back in session tomorrow even though nearly one out of every five students stayed home or were sent home with stomach pain or vomiting.

James Voyles is the interim superintendent in Tuscola, where absence levels at North Ward Elementary School were normal earlier this week. But he says today things changed.

"We had an unusually large number of absences to start the day, and during the course of the morning we had kids getting sick, throwing up, abdominal pain, some diarrhea, but but no fever," Voyles said.

Voyles says school is still on for tomorrow, but he asks parents not to send students back if they experience those symptoms. Tuscola's middle school and high school did not see the same illnesses today.

Voyles says just in case it may have been a virus at work, he called in custodians to give North Ward School a thorough disinfecting before tomorrow. He also says Douglas County Health Department officials have taken food samples, but he's not sure if food service had anything to do with the illnesses.

Categories: Education, Health

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - August 20, 2010

Raising Awareness About Devastating Flood in Pakistan

The devastation caused by the flooding in Pakistan is clear - 20 million people affected. That is more than the combined populations of Illinois and Indiana. Reports put the dead at 1,600. Asma Faiz is a doctoral candidate at the University of Illinois. Faiz recently returned from Islamabad, and she spoke to Illinois Public Media's Celeste Quinn about the importance of raising awareness and support for the country.

(Photo by Sean Powers/WILL)

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Categories: Environment, Health, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - August 13, 2010

Despite Heat, Cyclists Ready to Ride Saturday in “C-U Across the Prairie

Highs in the mid 90s are forecast for Saturday (August 14) but that's not expected to stop hundreds of central Illinois bicyclists from taking part in this year's "C-U Across the Prairie" Bicycle Ride.

The Prairie Cycle Club holds the event each year, on a prescribed route along rural roads in Champaign County. It's known as a "metric century" event, because its 65 mile length is equal to slightly over 100 kilometers. Shorter routes are also provided, at 15 and 35 miles.

Prairie Cycle Club spokesperson Lorrie Pearson says the hot weather might slow riders down, but she says keeping hydrated and using the rest stops set up along each route should help.

"As the heat increases, you're going to want to increase the amount of fluids that you take in, so definitely bring some water" advises Pearson. "We'll have water at the rest stops, but definitely bring water with you, and fill up at each of those rest stops."

Plus there's always "Sag Support" - the nickname for the club member driving a car along the route, ready to pick up weary cyclists who phone for help.

Pearson says "C-U Across the Prairie" is a ride, not a race, and cyclists of all skill levels are welcome.

Last minute registrations will be taken at the Hideway Grill near Lake of Woods Park in Mahomet, Saturday morning between 7 and 10. Pearson suggests cyclists planning to ride the full 65-mile route should arrive by 7:30. A $30 registration fee pays for breakfast at the start of the event, and a 2 PM lunch afterward.

NOTE: This story has been corrected, to identify Lorrie Pearson as a spokesperson for, not the president of the Prairie Cycle Club.

Categories: Health, Recreation

AP - Illinois Public Media News - August 12, 2010

Mosquitoes Test Positive for West Nile Virus in Champaign, Macon Counties

Late summer has become the season for West Nile virus in Illinois. In central Illinois, a mosquito sample collected last week in Champaign tested positive for West Nile, and as did five mosquito batches collected in Macon County.

Robert Millinger of the Macon Mosquito Abatement District says the discovery of West Nile virus comes at a time when the mosquito population is high.

"It's fairly high now, because of the amount of rain that we'd had", says Millinger. "A lot of containers and everything are full of water. And we're getting mainly culex mosquito right now, that is the carrier of the West Nile virus. They like, dark brackish water, to lay their eggs on."

Millinger says his crews test standing water for mosquito larvae in places like drainage ditches and abandoned swimming pools --- treating them when necessary. But he says people can cut down on mosquito population themselves, by targeting the standing water in their back-yards. He advises people to put screen coverings on containers kept out to collect rainwater, clear gutters of debris, and to empty old tires, wheelbarrows or other objects around the yard that collect water. Millinger says plastic swimming pools are another place where mosquitoes can breed, if allowed to hold the same water for several days.

No cases of human West Nile virus infection have been reported in Illinois so far this year. But the virus has shown up in mosquitoes or birds in 18 counties, including Champaign, Macon and Tazewell.

Categories: Health
Tags: health

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