Illinois Public Media News

AP - Illinois Public Media News - December 18, 2009

Cerro Gordo Woman Killed in Fall from Provena Covenant Hospital Window

UPDATE: This story has been updated to include identification of the victim.

A 44 year old Cerro Gordo woman was killed Friday when she fell out of a 7th-story window of Provena Covenant Medical Center in Urbana.

The Champaign County Coroner's office says Michelle Foss was being treated at the hospital for an undisclosed illness. An autopsy has been scheduled for Saturday.

Urbana Police say they don't believe foul play was involved in the fall.

A spokesman for the hospital says they're all "deeply saddened" by Foss' s death. Provena spokesperson Trent Pelman says a multi-disciplinary team of administrators, clinicians and support personnel are investigating the fall, with the goal of preventing such incidents in the future.

Categories: Health

AP - Illinois Public Media News - December 16, 2009

Vermilion County Health Dep’t Mulls Over a Shaky Funding Future

Vermilion County's Board of Health is considering different scenarios for the future of its health department, ranging from maintaining the status quo to closing its doors.

While state funding remains shaky, Department Administrator Steve Laker says a downsizing remains the most likely scenario. He says the department has received about 200-thousand dollars from the state the last two weeks, providing some relief. But the department is still relying on the county to fund areas like payroll, and can't pay back a loan from the county for 300-thousand.

Laker says the county may have to borrow from a bank to cover a revenue shortfall, but he says one other amusing possibility surfaced recently.

"I got a phone call last week from the state treasurer's office wanting to know if we were interested in special loan funds they had," Laker said. "Are we going to borrow money from the state to counter state funding shortages? It's a possibility. They've got some low-interest loan programs. I referred them to the county board chairman."

The state still owes the department about 600-thousand dollars.

Laker says the health department needs to finalize a presentation for the Vermilion County Board by the end of this week. Its meeting on December 29th will decide the structure of the health department for the immediate future.

All options for downsizing include termination of state grant contracts, and cutting some jobs. Laker says programs that could be on the bubble include maternal and child health programs and nursing home screening for senior citizens.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - December 11, 2009

State Expands H1N1 Vaccine Availabilty, Local Clinics Scheduled

Illinois health officials have expanded H1N1 flu shot eligibility to anyone seeking one, starting on Tuesday.

And area health departments have responded by scheduling vaccination clinics in Champaign and Danville next week. Champaign-Urbana's public health district holds four days of free clinics that begin Tuesday. That's when anyone over age 64 can receive the shot. Administrator Julie Pryde says supply has been good enough to offer vaccine for walk-ins during the week, along with helping providers like Carle and Christie Clinic. Meanwhile, Vermilion County's Health Department conducts its own clinics on Wednesday and Thursday. Administrator Steve Laker says it's unlikely his department would conduct any more clinics before Christmas, but that could change with the emergence of additional cases of flu-like illness.

"We would immediately gear up and scale our program back up," says Laker. "And we wouldn't have any trouble going back out to remote sites to do that. We've had excellent cooperation from local schools and other organziations that hosted sites, so we wouldn't have any problem. The only thing that might potentially affect that is what resources we have left after December 29th." The Vermilion County Board has scheduled a special meeting for that date, in which it could decide to downsize or dissolve the county's health department because of slow state payments. It's currently owed about $800,000. Laker says if the board did choose to shut down his department, there's no telling how much advance warning his offices would have or how services like vaccinations would continue.

The clinics in Danville are from 10 to 6 on Wednesday and 7 am to 12 pm on Thursday. Vaccinations at Champaign-Urbana's Public Health District run from 9 to 6 Tuesday thru Thursday, and 9 to 1 next Friday at its offices on West Kenyon Road.

Categories: Government, Health, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - December 08, 2009

Health Care Group Decries Using Gender to Set Health Insurance Rates

Many women are charged more for their health insurance than men, and a health care advocacy group says that's unfair discrimination.

The head of the Champaign County Health Care Consumers says her own experience with group health insurance for the six employees in her not-for-profit group revealed big differences in premium between male and female employees. Claudia Lennhoff says their provider, Personal Care, charges more than double for women in one certain age group than for similarly-aged men.

Lennhoff says ten other states have banned so-called gender rating for health insurance, but not Illinois. However, she says national health care legislation now in Congress could very well address the issue.

"Now if we can get it passed as a national law, as a part of national health reform, UI think that would obviously help everybody all over the country," Lennhoff said. "But if that doesn't happen I think we'll be among the first to champion such an effort in the state of Illinois."

Lennhoff acknowledges that insurers consider the health demands of female policyholders - including childbirth - in figuring their rates. But she claims profits are the main reason behind the different premiums. We've not been able to contact a representative of Personal Care for comment.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - December 04, 2009

Vermilion County Health Department Could Be Closing

Illinois' financial woes could force Vermilion County's Health Department to shut down. Administrator Steve Laker says the state owes the department about $800,000, and the department couldn't pay back a loan from the county for $300,000. Those funds became necessary to meet overall budget and payroll that are largely dependent on grants funded by the state.

At this Tuesday's Vermilion County Board meeting, members are to vote on scheduling a special meeting for December 15th to either terminate or restructure the health department. Laker says his hands are tied. "It just seems to be beyond anybody's control," says Laker. "It's certainly well beyond my control. And the only control that the county board may be able to exercise to stop this bleeding is to eliminate the health department. Now that's a pretty drastic action."

Laker says he'll give a memo to county officials to show what a downsized health department would look like. He says even that will be difficult. "Restructure means - is there some action in between status quo and dissillution? It probably means consideration the elimination of some grant-funded programs just to mitigate the deficit." Cutting the department would mean the end of successful areas like immunization clinics, family case management, and the Women, Infants, and Children, or WIC program and its 3,400 clients. And 75 jobs would be cut.

Danville State Representative Bill Black says he's sent a letter to Governor Pat Quinn's Chief of Staff to alert him of the situation. Black says Quinn's legislative council replied, and hoped to find a solution. The Republican says he's afraid the state would likely have to seek out borrowing money to bail out the health department and similar agencies.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - December 04, 2009

Meningitis-Like Infection Blamed for 11 Year Old Girl’s Death in Iroquois County

There's been no decision about giving medication to classmates or other people who may have had contact with an eleven year old girl who died this week in Iroquois County.

The Champaign County coroner says a preliminary autopsy determined that Natalie Johnson of Loda died Tuesday of gram-negative bacterial sepsis - it's a blood infection similar but not identical to meningitis.

Coroner Duane Northrup says he's still waiting for confirmation of test results.

A spokeswoman for the Ford-Iroquois Public Health District says Natalie's family members have been given preventative medications against the contagious disease, but it's not known whether classmates or others will need to be treated.

Categories: Health
Tags: health

AP - Illinois Public Media News - November 22, 2009

Quinn Creates Illinois Public Health Advocate

The State of Illinois has established a new office called Public Health Advocate.

The state already has a public health agency... but this role will go a step further... according to the Governor. He says the Advocate will improve health through education. The Advocate will also develop strategies for preventing and treating diseases.... Including asthma and diabetes. Governor Pat Quinn says another task will include making sure residents understand their health insurance options and their public health rights.

As health care has become the most expensive part of state government, Quinn says the Advocate will consider cost conscious measures.

While it's likely you've not heard about the new office until now... it's expected to become high profile in the future. The Public Health Advocate will work directly with local agencies... universities... schools and others.

The Governor used the occasion of American Diabetes month to create the office through an executive order.

Categories: Government, Health, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - November 20, 2009

New Law Nets More Federal Money for Hospital Care for Poor

A new law will help the state get more federal money to pay hospitals that care for the poor.

The state is expecting to get more than $1.1 billion from Washington because the federal government has temporarily increased its Medicaid reimbursement rate as part of the stimulus package.

The money will help the state pay Medicaid bills owed to hospitals and some other providers, including pharmacists.

Gov. Pat Quinn signed the bill Friday at Chicago's Children's Memorial Hospital.

State Sen. Jeffrey Schoenberg of Evanston said the money can only be spent on health care and human services. It cannot be diverted to other projects in the cash-strapped state.

Schoenberg said the money should start flowing early next year.

Categories: Government, Health, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - November 20, 2009

County Board Rejects Board of Health’s Termination Request

Work it out. That was the message from the Champaign County Board Thursday night to the County Board of Health and the Champaign-Urbana Public Health District. County Board members voted to reject the Health Board's request that they give 12-months notice for the termination of their contract for public health services with the CU-PHD. The Board of Health wanted the termination notice to spur talks to renegotiate their five-year contract with the CUPHD. Board President Julian Rappaport says a hike in CUPHD administrative fees is too high - and that the Public Health District Board defers too much to administrator Julie Pryde - who he says doesn't listen to their concerns. "Basically they don't have to respond to us in any way they don't want to respond to us because it's a contractual arrangment not a geninue intergovernmental arrangment."

But CUPHD Board Chair Carol Elliott accuses the Board of Health of not listening to Pryde when she tells them things they don't want to hear. "The negotiations - there's a lot of tension there because we give information and if they don't agree with it, then that's when they say that we're being unresponsive." Several county board members said the Board of Health and the Public Health District Board need to work things out - perhaps with a mediator - but that a contract termination notice was not the way to encourage dialog.

Categories: Government, Health, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - November 19, 2009

Proposal to Terminate CUPHD Contract Goes Before Champaign County Board

Champaign County Board of Health officials are unhappy with the public health services provided for the county through a contract with the Champaign-Urbana Public Health District. So, in order to re-negotiate, they've asked the County Board to approve a one-year termination notice at its meeting Thursday night.

Board of Health President Julian Rappaport says their arrangement with the CUPHD gives them little flexibility. The Public Health District provides similar health services to both Champaign-Urbana and the county, with the CUPHD administrator acting as the county's health director. Rappaport says there's no incentive for the CUPHD to be responsive to the Board of Health's particular concerns.

"We don't have any ability to set and implement policies that we think would be good policies for the county", says Rappaport. "So the nature of that relationship just completely limits us. Essentially what the County Board of Health becomes is a kind of a pass-through agency."

In addition, Rappaport says the county can't afford a CUPHD budget request for higher administrative costs for next year. A formal termination notice would allow the Board of Health to start negotiating with the Public Health District now, instead of waiting for its contract to expire in 2013. And if the negotiations don't go well, Rappaport says the Board of Health has hired a consultant to look at possible alternatives.

But CUPHD administrator Julie Pryde says there are few changes that can be made to basic state-mandated public health services, especially when little money exists to provide additional services.

"You have core services that your have to provide with Public Health funds", says Pryde. "And it specifies what needs to be done. Anything above and beyond that, there is some discretion. But if you're only covering your costs, you don't have much discretion."

In addition, Pryde says the termination notice would be confusing to the public, giving the false impression that health services might be disrupted. That's what happened in 2003, when a public health services contract ran out before the county and the CUPHD could come to terms on a new agreement. In this case, the termination notice would mean that the Public Health District's current health services to the county would continue for one year, while negotiations proceed.

Pryde says she's very accessible, and the County Board of Health doesn't need a formal termination notice to talk to her.

Categories: Government, Health, Politics

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