Illinois Public Media News

AP - Illinois Public Media News - December 04, 2009

Meningitis-Like Infection Blamed for 11 Year Old Girl’s Death in Iroquois County

There's been no decision about giving medication to classmates or other people who may have had contact with an eleven year old girl who died this week in Iroquois County.

The Champaign County coroner says a preliminary autopsy determined that Natalie Johnson of Loda died Tuesday of gram-negative bacterial sepsis - it's a blood infection similar but not identical to meningitis.

Coroner Duane Northrup says he's still waiting for confirmation of test results.

A spokeswoman for the Ford-Iroquois Public Health District says Natalie's family members have been given preventative medications against the contagious disease, but it's not known whether classmates or others will need to be treated.

Categories: Health
Tags: health

AP - Illinois Public Media News - November 22, 2009

Quinn Creates Illinois Public Health Advocate

The State of Illinois has established a new office called Public Health Advocate.

The state already has a public health agency... but this role will go a step further... according to the Governor. He says the Advocate will improve health through education. The Advocate will also develop strategies for preventing and treating diseases.... Including asthma and diabetes. Governor Pat Quinn says another task will include making sure residents understand their health insurance options and their public health rights.

As health care has become the most expensive part of state government, Quinn says the Advocate will consider cost conscious measures.

While it's likely you've not heard about the new office until now... it's expected to become high profile in the future. The Public Health Advocate will work directly with local agencies... universities... schools and others.

The Governor used the occasion of American Diabetes month to create the office through an executive order.

Categories: Government, Health, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - November 20, 2009

New Law Nets More Federal Money for Hospital Care for Poor

A new law will help the state get more federal money to pay hospitals that care for the poor.

The state is expecting to get more than $1.1 billion from Washington because the federal government has temporarily increased its Medicaid reimbursement rate as part of the stimulus package.

The money will help the state pay Medicaid bills owed to hospitals and some other providers, including pharmacists.

Gov. Pat Quinn signed the bill Friday at Chicago's Children's Memorial Hospital.

State Sen. Jeffrey Schoenberg of Evanston said the money can only be spent on health care and human services. It cannot be diverted to other projects in the cash-strapped state.

Schoenberg said the money should start flowing early next year.

Categories: Government, Health, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - November 20, 2009

County Board Rejects Board of Health’s Termination Request

Work it out. That was the message from the Champaign County Board Thursday night to the County Board of Health and the Champaign-Urbana Public Health District. County Board members voted to reject the Health Board's request that they give 12-months notice for the termination of their contract for public health services with the CU-PHD. The Board of Health wanted the termination notice to spur talks to renegotiate their five-year contract with the CUPHD. Board President Julian Rappaport says a hike in CUPHD administrative fees is too high - and that the Public Health District Board defers too much to administrator Julie Pryde - who he says doesn't listen to their concerns. "Basically they don't have to respond to us in any way they don't want to respond to us because it's a contractual arrangment not a geninue intergovernmental arrangment."

But CUPHD Board Chair Carol Elliott accuses the Board of Health of not listening to Pryde when she tells them things they don't want to hear. "The negotiations - there's a lot of tension there because we give information and if they don't agree with it, then that's when they say that we're being unresponsive." Several county board members said the Board of Health and the Public Health District Board need to work things out - perhaps with a mediator - but that a contract termination notice was not the way to encourage dialog.

Categories: Government, Health, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - November 19, 2009

Proposal to Terminate CUPHD Contract Goes Before Champaign County Board

Champaign County Board of Health officials are unhappy with the public health services provided for the county through a contract with the Champaign-Urbana Public Health District. So, in order to re-negotiate, they've asked the County Board to approve a one-year termination notice at its meeting Thursday night.

Board of Health President Julian Rappaport says their arrangement with the CUPHD gives them little flexibility. The Public Health District provides similar health services to both Champaign-Urbana and the county, with the CUPHD administrator acting as the county's health director. Rappaport says there's no incentive for the CUPHD to be responsive to the Board of Health's particular concerns.

"We don't have any ability to set and implement policies that we think would be good policies for the county", says Rappaport. "So the nature of that relationship just completely limits us. Essentially what the County Board of Health becomes is a kind of a pass-through agency."

In addition, Rappaport says the county can't afford a CUPHD budget request for higher administrative costs for next year. A formal termination notice would allow the Board of Health to start negotiating with the Public Health District now, instead of waiting for its contract to expire in 2013. And if the negotiations don't go well, Rappaport says the Board of Health has hired a consultant to look at possible alternatives.

But CUPHD administrator Julie Pryde says there are few changes that can be made to basic state-mandated public health services, especially when little money exists to provide additional services.

"You have core services that your have to provide with Public Health funds", says Pryde. "And it specifies what needs to be done. Anything above and beyond that, there is some discretion. But if you're only covering your costs, you don't have much discretion."

In addition, Pryde says the termination notice would be confusing to the public, giving the false impression that health services might be disrupted. That's what happened in 2003, when a public health services contract ran out before the county and the CUPHD could come to terms on a new agreement. In this case, the termination notice would mean that the Public Health District's current health services to the county would continue for one year, while negotiations proceed.

Pryde says she's very accessible, and the County Board of Health doesn't need a formal termination notice to talk to her.

Categories: Government, Health, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - November 09, 2009

Ex-Champaign-Urbana Public Health Official Indicted for Misconduct

The former head of the Champaign-Urbana Public Health District has been indicted on theft and official misconduct charges.

A Champaign County jury returned the seven-count felony indictment against 53-year-old Vito Palazzolo last week. A warrant has been issued for his arrest. It wasn't immediately clear whether he's been taken into custody.

Palazzolo is accused of using a health district credit card for personal use, including to buy a pickup truck and big-screen TVs.

The indictment includes charges of theft of governmental property, official misconduct and misapplication of funds. He was with the health district for 17 months until he was fired in August 2007.

No published telephone listing for Palazzolo could be located on Saturday.

Categories: Criminal Justice, Health
Tags: crime, health

AP - Illinois Public Media News - November 05, 2009

Restraining Order Issued on Abortion Law

A judge has issued a temporary restraining order delaying enforcement of a law requiring doctors to notify parents of teens seeking an abortion.

The order issued Wednesday was sought by the American Civil Liberties Union. It is to remain in effect until the judge can hear arguments on the group's opposition.

It came just hours after the state's Medical Disciplinary Board voted not to extend a 90-day grace period put into place in August.

The law requires doctors to notify the parents or guardians of girls 17 or younger 48 hours before a teens gets an abortion. There are provisions that allow girls to bypass parental notification.

Illinois' law was passed in 1995 but never enforced because of various court actions.

Categories: Government, Health, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - November 04, 2009

State Conducts Hearing on Proposed Carle Hospital, Clinic Merger

The recent announcement of a proposed merger between Carle Foundation Hospital and Carle Clinic has generated a lot of response.

But little of that was negative in a 2-hour state hearing in Urbana Wednesday morning. Support for the plan came from not only Carle administrators and physicians, but those who partner with the Clinic and hospital, like the United Way and Francis Nelson Health Center.

The $250 million merger would create a single not-for-profit organization with the intent of expanding charity care and more efficient operation. Claudia Lenhoff, the executive director of Champaign County Health Care Consumers, says the change in ownership could be one of the best things for the community. "Having Carle Clinic become a non-profit provider that abides by Carle Hospital's financial assistance policies as proposed in the application to the state will result in tremendous access for thousands of community members who are currently locked out of health care." said Lenhoff. Lenhoff's group is requesting some changes with the merger, including acceptance of all forms of health insurance, and for Carle to keep supporting its taxing districts that would lose revenue under the non-profit structure.

Urbana Mayor Laurel Prussing says she can't endorse the merger unless the new organization can shift those funds onto other taxing bodies. "They account for almost 10% of our total assessed valuation," said Prussing. "The loss of Carle's payment of its fair share of the cost of fire, police, and public works would be devastating, and would place an unfair burden on all other Urbana taxpayers." Prussing says an agreement is being discussed with Carle officials in which payments would be made to the city in lieu of property taxes for clinic properties, and to let the courts decide whether hospital-owned properties would be taxable. Illinois' Health Facilities and Services Review Board will rule on the merger in March.

Categories: Government, Health, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - November 02, 2009

Champaign Co. Nursing Home Workers Protest Management

The union representing workers at the Champaign County Nursing Home says the county board needs to take account for the behavior of management at the facility.

Nurses and other home staff represented by AFSCME Local 900 have submitted a petition with the signatures of nearly 100 employees. They allege areas like nursing, dietary, and housekeeping are often short-staffed and reprimanded for not finishing work on time. The union also says managers have failed to honor a 2-year contract that the County and union agreed to in July to cut down on the number of agency nurses.

Tara McAuley, a staff representative with AFSCME, said,"Something needs to be done, and if nothing else maybe the voters need to understand that the county board which has overseen this nursing home has sat on its hands and not done enough to improve this situation. And if that's what it takes, to appeal to the voters and get a new county board, then that's what we're going to do."

AFSCME members are also calling for the removal of Nursing Home Administrator Andrew Buffenbarger. The union says grievances against nursing home management are being filed almost daily, many over nurses and other staff who have lost their jobs. AFSCME says many nurses and Certified Nurse Assistants have quit out of fear of being fired.

Champaign County Board member and Nursing Home Board member Alan Nudo says he can't comment until he studies the charges further.

Categories: Government, Health, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - November 02, 2009

UI Researchers Help Map the Pig Genome, Opening Up Potential Human Research

Researchers at the University of Illinois are part of an international group of scientists that's decoded the DNA of the domestic pig.

Their research may one day prove useful in finding new treatments for both pigs and people, and perhaps aid in efforts for a new swine flu vaccine for pigs.

Larry Schook is the U of I biomedical science professor who led the project. He says the pig is the ideal animal to look at lifestyle and health issues in the United States. That's because pigs and humans are similar in size and makeup, and swine are often used in human research.

Researchers announced the results of their work today at a meeting in the United Kingdom. Schook says they'll spend the meeting discussing ways to use the new information.


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