Illinois Public Media News


NPR - Illinois Public Media News - August 21, 2013

At 1963 March, A Face In The Crowd Became A Poster Child

For the month of August, Morning Edition and The Race Card Project are looking back at a seminal moment in civil rights history: the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, where the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his iconic "I Have A Dream Speech" on Aug. 28, 1963. Approximately 250,000 people descended on the nation's capital from all over the country for the mass demonstration.

By Michele Norris

Listen

(Duration: 7:48)

Edith Lee-Payne

Many images from the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom have taken on iconic status. One of them is a photo of a young black girl attending the march.

Categories: History, Race/Ethnicity



WILL - Illinois Public Media News - August 11, 2013

What Happened To The Children Of Civil Rights Martyrs?

By Karen Grigsby Bates

Listen

(Duration: 5:04)

The family of slain civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., walk in the funeral procession in Atlanta, April 9, 1968.

Most Americans think of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. as a brilliant young minister who was one of the architects of the civil rights movement, and who was martyred for it in 1968, when he was assassinated. But to the revered leader's eldest son, Martin Luther King III — "Marty" to his family and friends — the famous Dr. King was just "Daddy." And like millions of other daddies across the country, he got pestered by his kids when they wanted something.




NPR - Illinois Public Media News - August 05, 2013

To Join ‘63 March On Washington: ‘Like Climbing A Mountain’

For the Month of August, Morning Edition and The Race Card Project are looking back at a seminal moment in civil rights history: The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, where the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., delivered his iconic "I Have A Dream Speech" on Aug. 28, 1963. Approximately 250,000 people descended on the nation's capitol from all over the country for the mass demonstration.

By Michele Norris

Listen

(Duration: 7:46)

Jack Hansan, who made signs for the March on Washington, and his wife Ethel now live in Northern Virginia.

Through The Race Card Project's six-word stories, we'll meet some of the people who witnessed that history and hear their memories and reflections on race relations in America today.




Page 12 of 31 pages ‹ First  < 10 11 12 13 14 >  Last ›