Illinois Public Media News

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - September 24, 2010

Stories from the “Three-I” Baseball League

Lots of baseball fans in and around Danville will spend part of their summer attending collegiate games, but the collegiate Danville Dans have only been around since 1989. Much of the early baseball history surrounding the city involves minor league baseball there, and the Three-I League...or Illinois, Indiana, and Iowa. The league lasted from 1901 to 1961.

Danville's involvement in the league actually predated Danville Stadium, going back to 1910, but John Dowling's first job as a batboy with the Danville Dodgers came as the park opened in 1946- at age 13. Illinois Public Media's Jeff Bossert talked with the retired educator to discuss his role with the team

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Categories: History, Sports
Tags: history, sports

AP - Illinois Public Media News - August 12, 2010

Closed Ernie Pyle Museum to be Open for Local Festival

A group fighting to preserve an Indiana museum dedicated to World War II correspondent Ernie Pyle says it sees the state's decision to open the site for a local festival as a step in the right direction.

The Ernie Pyle State Historic Site in the Vermillion County town of Dana will be open through Saturday as part of the Ernie Pyle Firemen's Festival.

The state closed the site in December and has sought to have it deeded or sold to community groups or local government.

The nonprofit Friends of Ernie Pyle hopes to vote on a plan to take over the site in September.

President Cynthia Myers says the group plans a national fundraiser to help pay operating costs.

The group also hopes to open the museum during the Parke County Covered Bridge Festival in October.

Categories: Community, History

AP - Illinois Public Media News - July 20, 2010

First Black Scholar in National Academy of Sciences was U of I Graduate

The first black scholar admitted to the National Academy of Sciences is being remembered as a mathematician who had a unique way of getting to the heart of the problem.

David Blackwell died of natural causes July 8th at the age of 91. The Centralia native attended the University of Illinois at age 16, earning his doctorate in mathematics in 1941. Blackwell's time at the U of I was followed by an appointment at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, alongside Albert Einstein, as well as time teaching at Howard University, and the University of California at Berkley, where he taught math for over 30 years. UCLA statistics professor Thomas Ferguson says he first met Blackwell as a student at Berkley in the early 50's. "He had this way of finding the right questions to ask that were the right problems to look at," said Ferguson. "Then he would go after those problems, and actually come out with something really interesting to say about them. In each of these areas that I'm thinking, he writes some sort of fundamental paper that everybody else jumps on, and then keeps going."

David Blackwell was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1965. His career had its share of obstacles. In 1942, he was blocked from becoming an honorary Princeton faculty member because of his race. Blackwell's initial efforts to teach at U-C Berkeley were also blocked for the same reason. But he also wrote two books, published more than 80 papers and eventually held 12 honorary degrees from schools like Harvard and Yale.

Funeral services are tentatively set for July 31st.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - July 11, 2010

B-17 Bomber Marks 75 Years at Willard Airport

The B-17 Bomber turns 75 this year. The fleet of planes covered the skies of Germany during World War II bombing raids, but today only a few remain. These flying bricks could sustain such significant battle damage that the aircraft lived up to its name, the Flying Fortress. To mark 75 years, the plane recently stopped at Willard Airport near Champaign. Illinois Public Media's Sean Powers had a chance to take a ride in the Flying Fortress.

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Categories: History, Technology

AP - Illinois Public Media News - May 19, 2010

Ernie Pyle Site in Western IN Gets a Brief Reprieve

The state of Indiana says the boyhood home of famed World War II journalist Ernie Pyle will no longer be a state historic site, but its supporters say the battle to reopen it hasn't ended.

The home in the Vermilion County town of Dana has been closed to visitors since January. The state Department of Natural Resources has put off a vote to de-access the property - in other words, to sell or reassign the frame house, a Quonset hut and the exhibits on the site. Spokesman Phil Bloom says the museum attracted few visitors and wasn't economically viable.

But Phil Hess, who heads the group Friends of Ernie Pyle, contends that the state didn't give the museum a fair chance when it laid off the site administrator.

"That was the first position lost, and the staff was cut periodically through the whole time to where the Ernie Pyle site was down to only 1/6 the hours of the average of the other sites in the Indiana system," said Hess. "We were kind of predestined to fail."

Now that the DNR has postponed a decision on disposing of the property until November, Hess says his group will ask the governor's office to reverse the closure decision. Hess claims museum donors were led to believe the exhibits would remain in Dana. DNR officials have proposed moving the most important Ernie Pyle memorabilia to the state museum in Indianapolis.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 15, 2010

Champaign Park Board Delays Decision on Virginia Theatre Marquee

Faced with opposition to its plans to take down the neon marquee at the Virginia Theatre, the Champaign Park Board has decided the issue needs more study.

The V-shaped neon marquee has announced shows at the Virginia for 60 years or more. But Champaign park officials say restoration plans have always called for installing a less flashy marquee resembling what was on the Virginia when it opened in 1921. Susanne Skaggs, speaking during the public comment portion of Wednesday night's Champaign Park Board meeting, says the neon marquee distracts from the Virginia's Italian Renaissance façade.

"The marquee, as far as I'm concerned, is nothing but signage" says Skaggs. "And signage, certainly, can be easily changed."

But eight other people told park commissioners the neon marquee is an important part of the Virginia's history. Adam Smith is vice-chairman of the Champaign Historic Preservation Commission, which has formally requested that the neon marquee be preserved. Smith says the marquee has become a local landmark in itself.

"If the neon is lit, you know something is happening that night", says Smith, "you pull over on Park Street, you park and you find out what it is."

Champaign Park Commissioners voted Wednesday night to delay a decision on the Virginia marquee until they can get more information --- including how much it would cost to restore the current neon marquee, which is badly run down.

But the Park Board did approve nearly $600,000 in restoration work to be done this summer on the Virginia lobby, funded by private donations. Park Commissioners hope to do work on the marquee at the same time.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - January 27, 2010

Lincoln Life Mask Donated to U of I Springfield campus

A Springfield family has donated a rare bronze cast of Abraham Lincoln to the University of Illinois-Springfield.

The family of Rick and Dona McGraw donated one of only 15 bronze casts of an original Abraham Lincoln life mask to the University of Illinois Springfield. The original plaster mold was taken of Lincoln's face by sculptor Clark Mills in 1865... just two months before Lincoln's assassination. The mask shows Lincoln's tired eyes and face full of wrinkles from the toll of the Civil War.

The McGraw family got the mask when they bought the McDonald's restaurant in downtown Springfield. It was the only item the family saved from the restaurant when they remodeled the building.

The university plans to display the mask at Brookens Library.

Categories: Education, History

AP - Illinois Public Media News - January 20, 2010

Champaign Makes Plan for 150th Anniversary Celebration

In March of 1860, the people of a little town called West Urbana voted to incorporate as the city of Champaign. Now, 150 years later, Champaign is preparing to celebrate it sesquicentennial.

Champaign's 150th anniversary celebration will be built on the themes of yesterday, today and tomorrow. Yesterday is featured first, with a local history exhibit scheduled for March and April at the Illinois Terminal building. Some of the artifacts to be displayed were brought to Tuesday night's Champaign City Council study session ... old newspapers, theater programs, a 19th century fire helmet decorated with an eagle's head design.

City Planner TJ Blakeman says they're looking for more pieces of city history - and invites the public to call him at 217-403-8800, if they have items they can loan for the exhibit. Items being sought include objects associated with the Illinois Central Railroad, Parkland College, the Champaign Police Department and Burnham City Hospital --- with other items from Champaign's past welcome as well.

The Champaign sesquicentennial will also feature a downtown music festival in July to honor the city's present accomplishments ... and the dedication in March of next year of a fountain to look toward the future. The Legacy Fountain will be erected at One Main Plaza. 150th Anniversary Celebration Coordinator LaEisha Meaderds says the 200-thousand dollar fountain is still in the early design stages.

While the city of Champaign and the Champaign Park District are donating some funds for the Sesquicentennial Celebration, they hope to raise another $250,000 from private organizations. Donations from Individuals will be accepted, but not actively sought.

WILL plans to be part of Champaign's 150th anniversary celebration as well --- with the production of a 13-part television series about the city.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - December 18, 2009

Terre Haute Mayor to Visit Nazi Death Camp

Terre Haute's mayor will travel to Poland next month with a Holocaust survivor to mark the 65th anniversary of the liberation of the Auschwitz death camp.

Mayor Duke Bennett will join about 50 other people on the trip to the former Nazi death camp where more than 1 million people, mostly Jews, died during World War II.

Eva Kor, a Terre Haute resident who founded the city's CANDLES Holocaust Museum, will be part of the group.

Kor's family was taken to the death camp near the end of World War II. She and a twin sister, Miriam, survived being subjected to Nazi experiments, but their parents and two older sisters died in the camp's gas chambers.

Auschwitz was in the headlines Friday, when Polish police reported that the camp's infamous iron entrance sign, which declares in German "Work Sets You Free,'' has been stolen.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - November 01, 2009

Map Could Yield Clues at Tippecanoe Battle Site

Officials in Tippecanoe County in western Indiana want to create a computer-assisted map of the historic Tippecanoe Battlefield that could yield clues about archaeological remnants buried there.

The Tippecanoe County Historical Association plans to use a device to measure anomalies in the earth's magnetic field to find underground objects. It also might use ground-penetrating radar to find items if funding can be found.

Archaeologist Colby Bartlett says it would be the first professional investigation of the site.

The Tippecanoe Battleground borders the town of Battle Ground, a few miles north of Lafayette. It was the site of the Battle of Tippecanoe in 1811. American forces led by General and Indiana territory Governor William Henry Harrison held off an attack by warriors from a confederation of Indian tribes. The battle was part of an ongoing conflict known as Tecumseh's War, named for the Shawnee leader. But the battle is also seen as a precursor to the War of 1812, which pitted the U-S against Great Britain and its Indian allies.

Buried artifacts at the Tippecanoe Battleground could include prehistoric American Indian artifacts and artifacts from the November 7th, 1811 battle.

Executive director Kathy Atwell says the historical association hopes to have the work done before the battle's 200th anniversary in 2011.

Categories: History
Tags: history

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