Scales of justice and gavel
AP Images
May 22, 2014

Probation Services Will Decrease If Income Tax Drops

The Illinois legislative session is set to end May 31st, and the votes needed to make the current income tax permanent are lacking. The possible tax decrease would damage state probation services. 


Stephen Papa served jail time because he couldn't pay fees.
(Grant Hindsley for NPR)
May 21, 2014

Supreme Court Ruling Not Enough To Prevent Debtors Prisons

Debtors prisons were outlawed in the United States nearly 200 years ago. And more than 30 years ago, the U.S. Supreme Court made it clear: Judges cannot send people to jail just because they are too poor to pay their court fines.


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Pictured in this 1954 handout photo is Louis Redding, center, on the steps of the Supreme Court Building, in Washington, D.C., with other NAACP attorneys who argued the school segregation case, Brown vs. Board of Education, From left are, Special Cou
(AP Photo/Courtesy of the NAACP)
May 19, 2014

WILL Archive: Thurgood Marshall Discusses School Integration

This month marks the 60th anniversary of Brown vs. Board of Education. The landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision outlawed “separate but equal” in public schools. Thurgood Marshall, who would later be appointed to the high court, argued the case. Two years after the ruling -- in 1956 -- Marshall visited the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign to talk about his work to end segregation and the challenges ahead. Marshall said despite efforts by detractors of integration, black and white students were meant to go to school under one roof.


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Carlos Rocha
(Danville Correctional Center)
May 16, 2014

Danville Inmate Who Killed Another Rethinks His Own Past

Carlos Rocha grew up in Chicago and became a gang member like his brothers. In 1998, he was arrested for weapons possession and sent to prison.  He earned more prison time after killing a fellow inmate.  Rocha was featured Friday in StoryCorps.


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