Illinois Public Media News

AP - Illinois Public Media News - May 12, 2011

Lawsuit Claims Vatican Covered Up Child Sex Abuse

The Vatican was named Wednesday in a lawsuit that claims the Holy See ultimately was responsible for covering up child sexual abuse by a now-imprisoned Chicago priest when church officials overlooked complaints about abuse and kept him in a position to continue molesting children.

The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Chicago on behalf of a woman whose son was molested by Father Daniel McCormack, is an attempt to "hold those most responsible for the global problem and the problem in this community to account in a way they have never been," said St. Paul, Minn.-based attorney Jeff Anderson.

McCormack pleaded guilty in 2007 to abusing five children while he was parish priest at St. Agatha Catholic Church and a teacher at a Catholic school and was sentenced to five years in prison. In 2008, the Archdiocese of Chicago agreed to pay $12.6 million to 16 victims of sexual abuse by priests, including McCormack. As part of that settlement, Cardinal Francis George also agreed to release a lengthy deposition and apologize to the public and each victim.

Anderson said the Archdiocese also agreed to release documents involving priests who had been credibly accused of abuse, but "not one file has been effectively produced so we can produce it to the public" and believes it's because the Archdiocese is following orders from the Vatican. In 2009, a Cook County judge granted the Archdiocese a protective order keeping portions of files private.

Marc Pearlman, another attorney involved in Wednesday's lawsuit, said it's possible some plaintiffs would not have agreed to the 2008 settlement without the promise from the Archdiocese to release the files.

A spokeswoman for the Archdiocese would not comment on Anderson's contention because it was not named in the suit.

The Vatican's U.S. attorney, Jeffrey Lena, referred questions about the documents to the Archdiocese but released a statement saying the lawsuit "is without any merit." He said the victim mentioned in the lawsuit had already received payment from the Archdiocese and "released all further claims" as part of the 2008 settlement.

Anderson said the settlement with Archdiocese did not specifically name the Vatican as a settling party.

This is not the first time Anderson has sued the Vatican. He also named the Holy See in cases filed in Wisconsin and Oregon. The Vatican has argued it is shielded from lawsuits as a sovereign nation, although Wednesday's lawsuit claims McCormack was a "direct agent" of the Vatican because he helped raise money for Peter's Pence, an annual collection for the Vatican.

Lena said the suit "rehashes the same tired theories already rejected by U.S. courts ... and importantly, the Holy See had no factual involvement in this matter whatsoever."

The lawsuit seeks unspecified monetary damages but Anderson said its aim is "to require the Vatican to come clean" with the names of the offenders it knows about and the files kept on them.

"It is the men at the top who make decisions that require secrecy" from others in the Catholic Church, he said.

"Daniel McCormick is just one of many offenders who have been allowed to offend in secrecy," he said. "There won't be change at the bottom until there's change at the top."

Last month, the Vatican was served with court papers stemming from decades-old allegations of sexual abuse against a now-deceased priest at a Wisconsin school for the deaf. The lawsuit was filed last year in federal court on behalf of Terry Kohut, now of Chicago, claiming that Pope Benedict XVI and two other top Vatican officials knew about allegations of sexual abuse at St. John's School for the Deaf outside Milwaukee and called off internal punishment of the accused priest, the Rev. Lawrence Murphy.

Anderson also has a pending lawsuit against the Vatican in Oregon for a man who claims he was abused at his Catholic school in the 1960s.

Categories: Criminal Justice, Religion
Tags: crime, religion

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - February 01, 2011

Political Turmoil Leaves Egypt in Unrest

The political turmoil in Egypt has brought between 250,000 and two million people taking to the streets in protest. The country's leader, President Hosni Mubarak, has promised not to run for re-election after his term ends in September. But University of Illinois professor Aladdin Elaasar predicted Mubarak's downfall back in 2009 in his book "The Last Pharaoh: Mubarak and the Uncertain Future of Egypt in the Obama Age." Elaasar spoke with Illinois Public Media's Sean Powers about the future of Egypt.

(Photo by Sean Powers/WILL)

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WILL - Illinois Public Media News - January 03, 2011

Longtime Newspaper Columnist Retires After Nearly 60 Years

A longtime columnist for The News-Gazette has left the paper after nearly 60 years.

Malcolm Nygren, a former minister with Champaign's First Presbyterian Church, joined the Gazette in 1953 along with about a half dozen other ministers recruited by the paper. Each of the ministers quit after writing a single column, but Nygren stuck around.

Nygren's columns often described different aspects of his life through the lens of the Christian faith. He said his editorials were never overtly religious, but reflected his feelings about major events ranging from the assassination of President John F. Kennedy to the birth of his daughters. He added that many of his columns could be read and interpreted on multiple levels.

"For some people it came at a time in their life when it was something they really needed, and it was useful for them," Nygren said. "It means different things to different people."

The Gazette's opinions editor Jim Dey was the first person each week to read over the column. He praised Nygren for always meeting a deadline, and writing in clear language that rarely required an edit.

"Writers come and go, and newspapers hopefully are here for the duration, and so people will get used to it," Dey said. "Nothing good lasts forever, and (Malcolm) Nygren's column is an example of that."

Dey said the News Gazette has no immediate plans to replace the column.

In his final editorial, Nygren wrote, "For the writer, it is a lot better to quit before you have to quit." But Nygren said he is not give up writing just yet. Readers can still follow his columns on his blog, "Byline: Malcolm Nygren."

"I will write when I want to, not on a deadline," Nygren said. "I'll get the good part of the job, and not have to have the pressure of it."

(Photo courtesy of Malcolm Nygren)


AP - Illinois Public Media News - October 19, 2010

U of I Academic Leader Says Review of Adjunct Professor Could Serve Entire Campus Well

A leading University of Illinois faculty member said it is good to see the Urbana campus initiating a process by which the contracts of faculty will be looked at before being renewed.

The review process concerns adjunct faculty member Kenneth Howell, who was told at the end of the academic year he would no longer teach courses on Catholicism. A student complained about an e-mail Howell sent to all his students regarding homosexual acts. Howell was later re-instated to the position after the Alliance Defense Fund threatened to sue the university.

The U of I's Committee on Academic Freedom and Tenure completed the review of Howell, which was released Monday by the online journal, 'Inside Higher Ed'. Urbana Faculty Senate Executive Committee Chair Joyce Tolliver said this report is important for all academics. "That is, I think the primary and most important recommendation of this report," Tolliver said. "That we get something in writing that would be a campus-level procedure to avoid this sort of ad-hoc decision making that we've had to make from department to department in the absence of any procedure to follow."

Tolliver has already met with Interim Chancellor Robert Easter to talk about setting up such a process for reviewing academic contracts. She would not give specifics of the panel's review of Howell. The Alliance Defense Fund threatened to sue the U of I when Howell was dismissed. An ADF attorney, Jordan Lorence, said the U of I Committee's report was correct in that all faculty, including adjunct professors, should be afforded academic freedoms to express opinions and given their due process rights.

"This faculty committee says 'look, we have to have some procedures in place to make sure that no one is just dismissed," Lorence said. "Not because they're a bad teacher, but because some people don't agree with what he's asserting in the classroom, and that would be a step forward for everybody."

It is not known how 'Inside Higher Ed' obtained the report. U of I Law Professor Matthew Finkin, who chairs the Committee on Academic Freedom and Tenure, declined to comment, saying these are 'personal issues.' U of I spokeswoman Robin Kaler issued a statement, stating 'the university appreciates the work of the committee, and agrees "with their assessment that teaching about religion versus advocating a religious belief or doctrine is a complex issue.

Categories: Education, Religion

AP - Illinois Public Media News - August 20, 2010

Feathers Ruffled by Quinn’s Stance Against Building the Lower Manhattan Mosque

Gov. Pat Quinn is sticking by his opposition to building a mosque near ground zero in New York despite criticism from a local immigrant rights group.

The Illinois Coalition for Immigrant and Refugee Rights on Friday called on candidates and elected officials to "stop injecting hate in the debate.''

Quinn said Friday he honors the patriotism of Muslim citizens but believes a group should rethink building a Muslim center and mosque near the site of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.

Quinn says there should be a "zone of solemnity'' around the site. He says any place of worship that takes away from the solemnity of ground zero should rethink their location.

He called his position "a matter of conscience.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - August 18, 2010

Reinstated Professor Says His Religious Studies Syllabus Won’t Change

The professor at the heart of a controversy over religious studies at the University of Illinois doesn't believe there's a permanent resolution to the dispute.

Kenneth Howell has accepted the U of I's offer to return to teach an introductory course on Catholic teaching, more than two months after he was let go. A student who was not in the class had complained of an email Howell had sent to one of his students defending the church's views on homosexuality and natural moral law.

Howell says the incident will not affect his teaching, except perhaps for a broader scope of issues covered at the end of the course.

"I'm going to give a general lecture on natural moral law because that's the essential part of Catholicism," said Howell. "Then I'll ask them (his students) if they want me to deal with the question of capital punishment or just war or homosexuality, and they will choose."

The U of I is now paying Howell for his work as an adjunct professor - until his removal in May, Howell had been paid by the St. John Catholic Newman Center, where he has now been reinstated as the head of the center's Institute for Catholic Thought.

A faculty-student committee on the Urbana campus is looking into the general issue of outside involvement in academics - Howell says he has not been asked to appear before that committee.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - July 30, 2010

Conservative Alliance Says Howell Re-Hiring Should Encourage Class Debate

An attorney with the conservative Alliance Defense Fund says the University of Illinois' decision to bring back a dismissed adjunct professor raises greater issues about speaking freely in a classroom setting.

David French says his group commends the U of I for offering Kenneth Howell his job back. But he says the ADF will continue to follow an academic committee's review of the complaint that got Howell fired in the first place. His comments about homosexuals in a lesson on Catholicism led to the e-mailed complaint from a student. Howell was re-hired Thursday. The issue still before a committee with the U of I's Faculty Senate is whether academic freedoms were violated. French says he's confident the panel will rule in Howell's favor - a decision he says should bring about further class debate across campus. "It's not supposed to be a place where there is a particular party line that is taught and professors are inflexibly living within the mandate of that particular party line at a public university," said French. "A public university is a marketplace of ideas where students should be free to engage their professors, and professors should be free to teach their subject."

French notes the protest over Howell's dismissal was generated not only by Catholics, but people of many faiths... and should do a lot to protect the comments of professors in class. He says the U of I's knee-jerk reaction to the Howell complaint affirms that students are just as concerned about academic freedoms. "I think that's one of the most encouraging aspects about this - it's the students themselves reacted so strongly to support academic freedom," said French. "Hopefully one of the good outcomes of this ordeal is that it's going to remind the university and other universities the importance of protecting professors' in-class speech."

Howell has until August 6th to accept his re-appointment to the U of I. He's traveling Friday and couldn't be reached for comment.

Categories: Education, Religion

AP - Illinois Public Media News - July 29, 2010

Professor in UI Catholic Studies Controversy Asked Back to Teaching

The University of Illinois says an instructor who recently lost his job over a complaint about his religious beliefs can continue teaching. However, the university says it will pay those teaching Catholic-related courses rather than have them paid by a church group.

The university said Thursday afternoon that the St. John's Catholic Newman Center will no longer pay adjunct instructors, like Kenneth Howell, who teach Catholicism courses.

Howell taught Introduction to Catholicism and Modern Catholic Thought. He says he was fired at the end of the spring semester after sending an e-mail explaining Catholic beliefs on homosexual sex to his students. The offer asks Howell to teach an introductory course to Catholicism. But U of I spokeswoman Robin Kaler would not say whether his re-appointment was related to public uproar over the dismissal. But she says the instructor is expected to stick to some standards. "As with all instructors at the university, we expect that he'll teach in manner that adheres to the constitutional principles that preclude the establishment of religion in a public university context," said Kaler.

He says he was preparing the students for an exam. A student complained the e-mail amounted to hate speech.

Howell could not be reached immediately for comment on the university's decision.

Categories: Education, Religion

AP - Illinois Public Media News - July 15, 2010

U of I Grad Student Gets Behind Effort to Have Religion Professor Reinstated

A University of Illinois graduate student staging a protest against the firing of a professor says controversial material in religion courses is nothing new.

Mechanical Engineering student Eli Lazar has been distributing fliers on campus and in the Chicago area, drumming up support for former adjunct professor Kenneth Howell. Howell was dismissed after a student complained about lessons in which the professor stated that homosexual acts are morally wrong. Lazar says he took a class on world religions... in which different professors covered major religions. For example - Lazar says a discussion on Hinduism contended that disabled persons were born that way due to karma, and something they'd done in a previous life. "The idea was we were there to learn about Hinduism - agree with it or not." said Lazar. "I've actually also sat in on Professor Howell's course, and think he's an excellent instructor. I think myself as well as a lot of other students are really upset about this because we feel that student sensitivity is starting to dictate how courses are taught."

Lazar, who is Catholic, says it's not a matter of whether he agrees with Howell, saying that's the language the Catechism of the Catholic Church teaches, and should encourage debate in class. "If students (in Howell's class) were to be getting bad grades for diagreeing with the professor, that's definitely a call for action," said Lazar. "I think if for some reason your professor was promoting a viewpoint with saying that you should go out and tell other people what they're doing wrong, that's fine. But I mean, this is a discussion on a controversial topic that was relevant, and it definitely should be allowed."

The U of I Faculty Senate's committee on Academic Freedom and Tenure is reviewing the decision. Lazar says he's confident the panel will choose to reinstate Howell. The student also says he's been impressed with new U of I President Michael Hogan's prompt response to his e-mails, asking that committee to take up the issue.

Categories: Education, Religion

AP - Illinois Public Media News - July 13, 2010

Faculty Senate Committee Will Review Dismissal of Religion Professor

A faculty committee will investigate whether a former University of Illinois religion professor's academic freedoms were violated.

Interim Chancellor and Provost Robert Easter says the Academic Senate's Committee on Academic Freedom and Tenure should complete its review of Kenneth Howell by time the fall semester starts. The adjunct professor was let go after a student complained about Howell's lessons on Catholicism, when he stated that homosexual sex was morally wrong. Easter says it's the U of I's obligation to present all sides of an issue, and that's valued by the academic community. But he says there are areas that require a review.

"An individual can be viewed as going beyond, if you will, the bounds of educational discussion discourse to advocating a particular viewpoint." said Easter. "And that's the question that seems to be important to addressing this particular case. I think that's why we'd be well advised to have a group of faculty have a look at this." Easter says administrators need to see what the committee says before determining whether Howell is reinstated.

The outgoing chair of the Senate committee, professor Jeff Dawson, says it needs a charge letter from Easter before proceeding with the review. "It will specify the scope of our investigation with respect to academic freedom and tenure." said Dawson. "And there are other issues about long-term relationships between the university and more than one religion group on campus, and the nature of that relationship." Easter says the professor's dismissal has also raised questions about the relationship between the U of I's Department of Religion and St. John's Catholic Newman Center. He says Liberal Arts and Sciences Dean Ruth Watkins is looking into whether it warrants further study.

Categories: Education, Religion

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