Illinois Public Media News

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - June 08, 2011

Old Name for Danville’s New Hockey Team, and Indoor Football to Return

Danville's new minor league hockey team will take the name of an old one. The Danville Dashers will become the westernmost team in the Federal Hockey League, when it begins play this coming fall. Home games will be played at the David S. Palmer Arena. That same arena hosted the old Danville Dashers, playing in the Continental Hockey League in the 1980s.

The Palmer Arena will also host a new indoor football team, beginning in 2012. The Ultimate Indoor Football League announced Tuesday that it's launching an expansion team in Danville, with play to begin next March.The team will mark indoor football's return to Danville for the first time since the Danville Demolition played one season for the American Indoor Football Association in 2007. The UIFL is holding a contest to choose a name for the new team.

Categories: Sports
Tags: sports


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - May 30, 2011

Illinois to Play Cal State Fullerton in NCAA Baseball Regional

Illinois will enter the 2011 NCAA Baseball Tournament as the No. 4 seed, slated for first round play in the Cal State Fullerton Regional.

Illinois (28-25) learned Monday morning that it will face host team Cal State Fullerton (40-15) on the regional's opening night on Friday, June 3. Game time is 10 PM Central Time. That game follows the matchup of No. 2 seed Stanford (32-20) and No. 3 seed Kansas State (36-23) in the first round of double-elimination play.

Illinois earned an automatic bid to the NCAA Tournament, when it won the Big Ten Tournament, sweeping through the competition with three straight wins. Illinois shared the regular-season title with Michigan State, but defeated Michigan State twice as it won its second Big Ten championship in the last seven years.

Friday's game will mark Illinois baseball coach Dan Hartlieb's first regional appearance as a head coach. Hartlieb was an assistant on Illinois' NCAA Tournament teams in 1998 and 2000 --- and a graduate assistant coach on SIU's 1990 CBAA Tournament team.

Categories: Education, Sports

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - May 29, 2011

Illinois Wins Big Ten Baseball Tournament; Awaits NCAA Tourney Assignment

The Illini baseball team beat the Michigan State Spartans 9-1 Saturday night, to win the Big Ten Baseball Tournament in Columbus, Ohio, and a berth in the upcoming NCAA Baseball Tournament. It's Illinois' first Big Ten title and NCAA berth in baseball since 2000.

The win also marks the first time in U of I history that Illinois has won both the Big Ten regular-season and tournament titles in the same season.

Junior left-hander Corey Kimes threw his first complete game, striking out a career-high seven batters. Senior first baseman Matt Dittman hit a grand slam home run in the third inning. Both players were named to the All-Tournament Team, along with center fielder Willie Argo, starting pitcher John Anderson, designated hitter Justin Parr and catcher Adam Davis, who was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.

Illinois has defeated Michigan State earlier in the tournament, 4 to 1 in Game 8 on Friday night. Michigan State went on to beat Minnesota in Saturday afternoon's elimination game, putting them in place to play Illinois for the tournament title Saturday evening.

Illinois now waits for Monday morning, when they'll learn what their regional assignment will be for the NCAA Baseball Tournament. Regional tournament play begins Friday, June 3rd.

Categories: Sports
Tags: sports

AP - Illinois Public Media News - May 29, 2011

Wheldon Wins Stunning Indy 500

Dan Wheldon was zipping toward the final corner of Sunday's Indianapolis 500, surely figuring the best he could do was another runner-up finish.

Then he came upon JR Hildebrand's crumpled car, all smashed up and sliding along the wall.

The rookie had made the ultimate mistake with his very last turn of the wheel, and Wheldon, not Hildebrand, made an improbable turn into Victory Lane.

"It's obviously unfortunate, but that's Indianapolis," said Wheldon, who won Indy in 2005 and finished second the last two years. "That's why it's the greatest spectacle in racing. You never now what's going to happen."

This might have been the whackiest one ever.

In his first event of the year, Wheldon captured the ultimate IndyCar prize. But the 100th anniversary of the "Greatest Spectacle in Racing" will be remembered more for the guy who let it slip away with the checkered flag in sight.

Leading by almost 4 seconds and needing to make it around the 2 1/2-mile track just one more time, Hildebrand cruised through the first three turns with no problem.

The fourth one got him. He went too high, lost control and slammed into the outside wall. Wheldon sped past, while Hildebrand's battered machine skidded across the line 2.1 seconds behind, still hugging the concrete barrier.

"It's a helpless feeling," Hildebrand said.

The 23-year-old Californian got into trouble when he came up on another rookie, Charlie Kimball, going much slower as they approached the last corner. Instead of backing off, the leader moved to the outside to make the pass - a decision that sent him slamming into the wall to a collective gasp from the crowd of 250,000.

"I caught him in the wrong piece of track," Hildebrand said. "I got up in the marbles and that was it."

While Wheldon celebrated his second Indy 500 win, series officials reviewed the video to see if Wheldon passed the wrecked machine before the caution lights went on. He clearly did, and Hildebrand's team said it wouldn't protest the result.

That gave the Brit another spot on the Borg-Warner Trophy.

Not bad, considering he doesn't even have a full-time job.

"I just felt a lot of relief. It's an incredible feeling," Wheldon said. "I never gave up."

He took the traditional swig of milk and headed off on a triumphant lap around the speedway - a lap that Hildebrand should have been taking.

Instead, the youngster stopped by the garage to get a look at his mangled car, which was hauled through Gasoline Alley instead of being wheeled into Victory Lane. He's now in the company of athletes such as Jean Van de Velde, who squandered a three-shot lead on the last hole of the 1999 British Open, and Lindsey Jacobellis, whose hotdogging wipeout at the 2006 Winter Olympics cost her a certain gold medal.

They had it in the bag - and threw it all away.

"I'm just frustrated. It's not because we came in here with the expectation of winning and we didn't," Hildebrand said. "I felt like I just made a mistake and it cost our boys. I guess that's why rookies don't win the Indianapolis 500 a whole lot, and we'll be back next year, I guess."

After losing his ride from last season - with Hildebrand's team, no less - Wheldon had plenty of time to hang out with his wife and two young children, while also dealing with the burden of his mother being diagnosed with Alzheimer's. He longed to get back behind the wheel, and when May rolled around he had a one-off deal with retired driver Bryan Herta's fledgling team.

They came up with a winning combination, which may well lead to a bigger gig.

For now, though, there are no guarantees - even for the Indy 500 champion.

"I think my contract expires at midnight," Wheldon said, managing a smile.

The 200-lap race was dominated much of the day by Chip Ganassi's top two drivers, defending champ Dario Franchitti and 2008 winner Scott Dixon.

But after a series of late pit stops, things really got interesting. Second-generation racer Graham Rahal spent some time up front. Danica Patrick claimed the lead but had to stop for fuel with nine laps to go. Belgium driver Bertrand Baguette had already gotten past Patrick, but he didn't have enough fuel, either.

When Baguette went to the pits with three laps to go, the lead belonged to Hildebrand. All he had to do was make it to the end.

He came up one turn short.

"My disappointment is for the team," Hildebrand said. "We should've won the race."

Not that Wheldon isn't a deserving champ. He has 16 career wins and finished in the top 10 of the series standings seven years in a row, capturing the title in 2005.

But in the peculiar world of auto racing, which runs on sponsorship dollars and not necessarily credentials, Wheldon was squeezed out of his ride at Panther.

He sat out the first four races of the year, but no way was he going without a ride at Indy. He's had too much success around this place.

"Dan Wheldon, he's a great winner," Patrick said. "And what a great story. He hasn't run this year. ... That's really cool."

Still, it was a bitter disappointment for Patrick, who ended up 10th.

"It's more and more depressing when I don't win the race," said Indy's leading lady, who might be heading to NASCAR next year.

Patrick knows about misfortune leading to victory for Wheldon. His first victory came when she led late in the race, only to have to back off the throttle to save enough fuel to make it to the finish.

This time, Wheldon never led a lap until the last one, the first time that's happened since Joe Dawson won the second Indy 500 in 1912.

It was the second time a driver lost the lead on the last lap - it happened to another rookie, Marco Andretti, in 2006 - and it's something Hildebrand will always remember.

"Is it a move I would do again?" he said. "No."

Rahal finished third, followed by hard-charging Tony Kanaan, who came all the way from the 22nd starting spot to contend for his first 500 win, just a year after leaving Michael Andretti's team. Dixon was fifth, followed by Oriol Servia, while Franchitti lost speed in the closing laps and slipped all the way to 12th.

Right from the start, the Ganassi cars showed just how strong they would be on a sweltering day at the Brickyard, where the temperature climbed into the upper 80s and the heat on the track was well over 100 degrees.

From the middle of the front row, Dixon blew by pole-sitter Alex Tagliani before they even got to the start-finish line, diving into the first turn with the lead.

Tagliani ran strong through the first half of the race but began having problems with his handling. Finally, on lap 147, he lost it coming out of the fourth turn and banged into the wall for a disappointing end to an amazing month for his car owner, Sam Schmidt, who watched the race from a wheelchair in the pits.

Schmidt has been a quadriplegic since a racing crash 11 years ago, but he's turned his efforts to building an IndyCar team. He had another car in the race, one-off driver Townsend Bell, who started from the inside of the second row and ran in the top 10 much of the day until he was collided with Ryan Briscoe on lap 158.

Briscoe's crash summed up the day for IndyCar's other elite team.

Roger Penske's trio of drivers capped a disappointing month with a grim performance on race day.

On the very first stop, Will Power drove out of the pits with a loose left rear wheel, which flew off before he got back on the track. While it bounced down pit road, Power set off around the 2 1/2-mile oval on three wheels, sparks flying out from under his machine as it limped back for another tire. He finished 14th - the best showing for Penske Racing.

Helio Castroneves, hoping for a record-tying fourth Indy win, started back in 16th spot after struggling in qualifying and did his best just to stay on the lead lap, much less challenge for the lead. That effort ended when Briscoe and Bell got together - and Castroneves ran off a piece of debris, shredding a tire. He wound up one lap down in 17th.

Briscoe's crash left him 27th.

"It was a tough day," Penske said. "But you've got execute."

There was only one wreck on the much-debated double-file restarts but plenty of thrilling moves - just what IndyCar officials were hoping for when they imposed the NASCAR-style procedure after each caution period.

At one point after taking green, Castroneves had to dive onto the lane that cars normally take coming out of the pits just to get through the second turn. The crowd erupted in cheers, clearly enjoying the show.

For Hildebrand, the cheers turned to groans on the final turn.

"It's just a bummer," he said.

Categories: Sports
Tags: sports

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - May 16, 2011

Guenther: Decision to Retire ‘Bittersweet

A search committee will begin seeking out a new athletic director at the University of Illinois.

Ron Guenther is retiring after 19 years on the Urbana campus. The 65-year old and one-time Illini football standout says age wasn't really a factor in his decision. Guenther says was still an emotional decision for him, one that he confirmed just a few days ago.

"It's actually bittersweet, as the way I looked at it," Guenther said in a noon hour conference call with reporters on Monday. "I think there is a point where emotionally, I was very convinced I was ready. I am going to do something else, I just don't know what it's going to be."

Guenther said he had been thinking about retirement since the start of the calendar year. He says the option for a two-year extension was there, but decided the middle of last week that leaving the position was the right option. But Guenther said it's still been an emotional time.

"Even my wife Meagan said two weeks ago 'are you sure this is what you want?' And the answer was 'I'm not sure," said Guenther. "But I know in my gut that institutions are much bigger than any one person, and that this was the time in my opinion to move to new leadership."

Athletic teams under Guenther made an Illini men's basketball Final Four appearance, and Illinois football teams made six bowl appearances. But he said achievements in those programs shouldn't overshadow others.

"The run we had in tennis... and the current run that we have going in men's golf," Guenther said. "I don't think there's any one particular thing that I look at. I drive around here (the Urbana campus) early in the morning before anybody gets in and I look at the buildings, and that's a piece of it as well."

Guenther said everything is place for the Illini football team to have success, coming off a Bowl win and retaining most of the staff. And he said there's good reason to be optimistic about the basketball team with 3 solid classes, and another coming in.

Guenther helped oversee the $121-million renovation to Memorial Stadium, and he says plans to upgrade Assembly Hall are also on the right track. Guenther said he admits U of I President Michael Hogan has a lot on his plate, and that opting for the two-year extension would have been one less thing for him to think about. But Guenther said Hogan's reaction was 'what's best for you?' as the two of them discussed his decision.

U of I Business Dean Larry DeBrock will chair the committee to replace Guenther, whose last day is June 30th. Guenther is a native of Elmurst who played Illinois football in the 60's, earning MVP honors in 1966.

Categories: Education, Sports

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - May 16, 2011

U of I Athletic Director Ron Guenther to Retire

University of Illinois Athletic Director Ron Guenther says he will retire after his contract runs out June 30th.

Guenther said in a news release Monday that he's been working with the university on a succession plan and a search committee has started looking for his replacement. Guenther had talked recently about possibly staying on after June to begin work on a planned renovation of the Assembly Hall.

Guenther's 19 years on the job have been marked by a number of sports-related construction projects. They include the recent $121 million renovation of Memorial Stadium. Interim Vice President and Chancellor Bob Easter praised Guenther for his integrity and high athlete graduation rates.

Guenther is a University of Illinois graduate and played on the football team in the early 1960s.

Categories: Education, Sports

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - April 29, 2011

Olympic Medalists At Illinois Marathon Say Race Not Just For the Swiftest

For Frank Shorter and Lorraine Moller, victory in a marathon was beating the other runners. But the two Olympic medalists note with approval the increase in people who run marathons to achieve their "personal best".

Shorter and Moller are guests at this weekend's Illinois Marathon in Champaign-Urbana. Shorter said that when he started competing, the marathon was a sport mostly for competitive runners --- but he said that's changed.

"The race has become de-mystified in a good way," Shorter explained. "It's the idea that if you just put in the time, and you just put in the effort and put in the training, you can actually run a marathon. So we're actually at the point where everybody benefits from that."

Moller said she came to understand those benefits as her competitive running career came to a close. While she could no compete against the world's top runners, Moller said she discovered intrinsic rewards from running that didn't require being among the top performers.

"And gradually those intrinsic rewards, such as just the joy of moving, and running and feeling good --- and having that communion with nature and with my higher self while I was out running --- were rewards in themselves," Moller said. "And those are the things that, when I retired, that still get me out the door to go out for a run."

Frank Shorter took the gold and the silver medals in the marathon at the 1972 and '76 Olympics respectively --- while Moller earned a Bronze medal at age 37, in the 1992 women's marathon in Barcelona. Both were speakers Friday at the Illinois Marathon's Health and Fitness Expo on the University of Illinois Urbana campus. In addition, Shorter will be running in the 10K race Saturday morning.

About 19,000 people have registered for this year's Illinois Marathon events. That includes the marathon itself on Saturday morning, a Half Marathon, a Wheelchair Half-Marathon, a Marathon Relay, a Youth Run, the 10K Run and Walk, and a 5K run on Friday evening.

Elite athletes in this 3rd annual Illinois Marathon include Kipkurul Geofry, Siyoum Debele Lemma and Jeffrey McClellan among the men, and Habtamnesh Gashaw, Holly Fearing and Lucie Mays-Sulewski among the women.

Categories: Sports
Tags: sports

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - April 20, 2011

IHSA Tightens Policy on Head Injuries

The Illinois High School Association board revised a policy this week regarding high school athletes who sustain head injuries during a game.

IHSA executive Kurt Gibson said students in Illinois have traditionally not been required to seek medical care the day after a head injury. He said according to the new policy, athletes must get care in the days after an incident happens, and they can only take part in a game if given clearance to do so by a licensed health care provider.

"We know so much more about concussions now than we did even a decade ago," Gibson said. "We realize and can see the need to have clear return to play policies in place in order to protect the safety of student athletes."

The policy change follows months of reports about long-term injuries sustained by athletes. The Center for Injury Research and Policy reports that about 20 percent of injuries during high school athletic competitions last year were diagnosed as concussions.

Scott Hamilton, the athletic director at Unity High School in Tolono, said he hopes the guidelines bring to the light the seriousness of sports-related injuries.

"There are so many different degrees of a kid getting hit or a kid falling or a kid bumping his head or two kids running into each other," Tolono said. "I think the important thing that's happening with all this is just awareness.

Categories: Health, Sports
Tags: health, sports

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - April 19, 2011

Urbana City Council Approves Indoor Soccer Complex

A native of England is bringing his vision of year round soccer to Urbana.

The city council has accepted Developer Graham Berry's plans for a 24,000 square foot facility on North Willow Road, west of O'Brien Auto Park.

Berry says he expects to break ground on 'Soccer Planet' next month. He says the visibility from the interstate was a big bonus for the location, as well as the Tax Increment Financing incentives tied to that location. Berry has played in adult soccer leagues that require him to drive to Decatur. Other kids in the area play soccer in cities like Bloomington and Springfield.

But Berry says a local indoor facility built specifically for the sport will open new opportunities for many ages, "...Whether it be a recreational player, a 4-year old who wants to be in a developmental program, learning the game but it's more a social thing between him and his parent or guardian.." he said. "So the competitive player who wants to play year round, this facility is going to provide that."

Berry says the site in Urbana will be state of the art, with a playing surface less susceptible to injuries. "It's not astro turf," he said. "It's field turf. So it's actually a synthetic grass that actually has blades and either rubber infill or matting to protect players when they fall because there's some cushion there."

Berry says the surface will also produce a better bounce for soccer balls. Soccer Planet should be finished by the end of September.

Categories: Government, Politics, Sports

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