Illinois Public Media News

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - August 20, 2012

UC2B Funding Raises Concerns About Open Access

By Jim Meadows

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Supporters of the UC2B Big Broadband project know they want a high capacity broadband network for the Champaign-Urbana area. However, there is concern that the way money for UC2B is being raised could hinder the project's long-term commitment to open access.






AP - Illinois Public Media News - July 03, 2012

4 Champaign Area Companies To Get State Help

There's good news for four Champaign-Urbana area startup companies.

The (Champaign) News-Gazette reports the companies have been approved to receive investments from the Invest Illinois Venture Fund that was set up last year.

Under the program, companies can receive up to 25 percent of their own lead investments from the state.

The companies that have been approved but haven't yet received any money from the state are Caterva, ANDalyze, Diagnostic Photonics and Nuvixa.

The goal of the fund is that it will replenish itself. The newspaper reports that once a company is viewed as self-sustaining, the state could stop investing and the proceeds from its investment will be used to help other companies.

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Categories: Education, Technology

AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 02, 2012

Illinois Bill Aims to Make Online Dating Safer

State lawmakers in Illinois are trying to make it safer for people to use online dating sites.

The Decatur Herald & Review reported Sunday that legislation aiming to do that passed the Illinois House last week.

It would require Internet dating services operating in Illinois to post disclaimers saying whether they conduct background checks on their members.

The measure is sponsored by state Rep. Michelle Mussman, a Democrat from Schaumburg.

She says she wants to help Internet users "become more savvy" and protect themselves from online predators.

Opponents say the bill overreaches. Republican Rep. Jim Durkin of LaGrange says adults should be responsible for their own safety when using such sites.

The legislation now goes to the Senate.

Categories: Technology

AP - Illinois Public Media News - March 27, 2012

Indiana Lottery Watching Illinois’ Online Sales

Indiana lottery officials are keeping their eye on an Illinois effort to sell lottery tickets online.

The Hoosier Lottery hasn't started formally looking at online sales. But spokesman Al Larsen tells The Journal Gazette (http://bit.ly/GXns7K ) that they'll consider it depending on how the program in Illinois works out.

Illinois began online sales on Sunday of tickets for the multistate Mega Millions game and its state lottery. It's the first state to try an online program.

The system in Illinois sets up a direct deposit account for players with winnings of less than $600. Those who win more than that will receive email notification that they've won. Players will also be able to set up subscriptions for automatic wagers.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - March 24, 2012

Illinois to Begin Online Lotto Sales Sunday

As Illlinois adults sip their coffee and unfold their newspapers early Sunday morning, state officials say they can also become some of the first people in the country to buy lottery tickets online.

Illinois will become what lotto officials say is the first state in the U.S. to sell tickets over the Internet when the high-security website goes live around 7 a.m. Sunday. Online players will be able to buy up to $10 worth of Lotto or Mega Millions tickets, and state lawmakers are already considering whether to add Powerball into the mix.

The Illinois Lottery estimates e-ticket sales could net hundreds of thousands of new players, and bring in between $78 million and $118 million in new revenue for the cash-strapped state, half of which would fund capital projects. State lawmakers signed off on the online pilot program in 2009, but implementation had been held up pending legal approval from the U.S. Justice Department, which finally came in December.

In Illinois, where lotto tickets must be bought at a licensed retailer, the plan hasn't been without controversy. Some retail groups have worried that online lottery sales, which they say account for up to 50 percent of revenue at some convenience stores, would take a huge bite out of their in-store business. And anti-gambling advocates complain Internet ticket sales could tempt addicts and underage buyers.

But Illinois Lottery Superintendent Michael Jones said the system is secure, and require would-be gamblers to turn over their names, addresses, Social Security numbers and credit card information before they click "buy."

"But there's also the psychological protection that if you attempt to circumvent our rules by playing underage, or playing from outside the state, and you win, we do a winner validation for any prize over $600," Jones said Friday. "And we won't pay you."

Meanwhile, retailers and convenience store owners have been in talks with Jones and Northstar Lottery Group, the private company that runs the Illinois lotto. The store owners had been pushing for a bump in their five percent commission rate to offset a feared drop in in-person ticket sales, as well as a plan to require that online tickets be purchased exclusively using designated debit cards that could only be bought and recharged at brick-and-mortar stores.

But business groups seem to have quieted down after striking a deal to require that Illinois study the effects of online ticket sales on retailers, and the viability of the debit card idea. That plan will be tacked onto the bill that would add Powerball to the Internet pilot program. The amendment is designed to "lift the opposition that the convenience store owners have had," and will likely be introduced next week, according to the bill's sponsor, State Sen. Jeff Schoenberg, D-Evanston.

Retailers say they have a symbiotic relationship with the Illinois Lotto. But they're staying vigilant.

"These concerns are not going away, but at least we now - I shouldn't say 'at least' - we now have - or will have - a mechanism to determine whether our concerns play out," said David Vite, CEO of the Illinois Retail Merchants Association, which represents 5,100 convenience stores across the state.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - March 07, 2012

Chicago Man Accused of Cyber-Attacks

A Chicago man was charged Tuesday of computer hacking in collaboration with five other people aligned with the activist group Anonymous.

Federal prosecutors accuse Jeremy Hammond of stealing the credit card information of nearly 60,000 clients of Strategic Forecasting Inc. (Startfor), a global intelligence firm. Prosecutors say Hammond went by the name "anarchaos," among other online aliases.

A federal complaint alleges Hammond posted that information on a file sharing website resulting in at least $700,000 worth of unauthorized charges. The complaint also said Hammond helped obtain emails from Stratfor employees and put them on certain Internet websites.

The whistleblower website, Wikileaks started publishing emails from Stratfor in February. The website says it has nearly 5 million emails obtained from that company. It's not completely clear whether those emails are the ones prosecutors allege Hammond obtained by hacking into Stratfor's servers.

Hammond appeared in federal court in Chicago on Tuesday after being arrested the night before. He will be transferred to New York to stand trial.

Attorney Jim Fennerty represented Hammond in his initial Chicago court appearance. Fennerty also represented Hammond about two years ago when he was arrested for protesting at a Neo-Nazi gathering. He also confirmed Hammond had been detained for his opposition to Chicago's bid to host the Olympic Games, though Fennerty didn't represent Hammond in that case. Fennerty said he knows Hammond through his activism in Chicago.

"I like the guy. Maybe he does things I wouldn't do," Fennerty said.

Hammond is charged with three federal counts and faces a possible maximum sentence of 10 years for each of those counts.

"He does take them [the charges] very seriously. As you saw him today he looks kinda like - somebody said he looked kinda shell-shocked," Fennerty told reporters Tuesday.

Another four hackers were charged with similar counts in an indictment unsealed Tuesday in Manhattan federal court. A fifth hacker, Hector Xavier Monsegur, pleaded guilty last August. Monsegur is described in court papers as the ring-leader of the Anonymous sub-group LulzSec. Federal agents said Monsegur cooperated with the FBI in their investigation.


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