Illinois Public Media News

AP - Illinois Public Media News - August 03, 2011

Seven Illinois Residents Sick from Salmonella

Seven Illinois residents have been sickened by a nationwide outbreak of salmonella that authorities say could be from ground turkey.

The Illinois Department of Public Health is working with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as well as the United States Department of Agriculture, to try to nail down the exact source of the contamination.

Illinois Department of Public Health spokeswoman Melaney Arnold said it will be a very complicated process.

"It does take quite a lot of time to do the trace back just because of all the steps -- first of all recognizing that there is one particular type of strain of salmonella out there and then trying to make that link -- there are so many different steps and so many interviews that need to occur that it does take time," Arnold said.

According to Arnold, until a source is identified, Illinois residents can still buy ground turkey. Arnold recommends residents prepare and handle the meat safely, cooking the turkey to an internal temperature of 165 degrees Fahrenheit. As long as people take the right precautions, she said, they should be fine.

Across the country, a total of 77 people have been affected by the strain, leading to one death. In Illinois, the first case was reported to the state's Department of Public Health in March, and the most recent case was reported on June 29.

The USDA has yet to recall any turkey products in relation to the outbreak.

Categories: Health
Tags: health

AP - Illinois Public Media News - August 03, 2011

Obama Celebrates Birthday with Chicago Fundraiser

President Barack Obama's re-election campaign expects to raise tens of millions of dollars less this summer than it did in the spring because negotiations over the nation's debt limit forced Obama to cancel several fundraisers.

Obama's campaign said Wednesday it canceled or postponed 10 fundraisers involving the president, Vice President Joe Biden and White House chief of staff Bill Daley in the past month because of the debt talks, scrubbing events in California, New York and elsewhere.

Only weeks after the president's campaign reported collecting a combined $86 million with the Democratic National Committee, Obama's team is trying to lower expectations about its fundraising juggernaut while signaling to its army of volunteers and activists that they need to fill the void. Obama is coming off a bruising battle with congressional Republicans over raising the government's debt ceiling and is expected to face a formidable challenge from Republicans in 2012 against the backdrop of a weakened economy.

"We're going to raise significantly less in the third quarter than we did in the second quarter," said Jim Messina, Obama's campaign manager. "We will not be able to replace all of these events just because of his busy schedule. We always knew that he had his job and we had to do this around his schedule, and the truth is we just have to deal with canceling a month's worth of events."

Obama holds a large fundraising advantage over his Republican rivals and was raising money later Wednesday in his hometown of Chicago on the eve of his 50th birthday. Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney hauled in more than $18 million through the end of June, while all of his GOP primary opponents were in the single-digits.

Democrats said the slow fundraising pace during the summer was expected because many donors are on vacation and high-dollar events don't typically resume until after Labor Day. Obama, meanwhile, was taking a jobs-oriented bus tour of the Midwest in mid-August and was not scheduled to hold many donor events during the month. The fundraising quarter was expected to feature smaller gatherings headlined by Obama "surrogates," or high-profile supporters such as governors and lawmakers.

"This is not an easy time to raise money," said former Rep. Martin Frost, D-Texas, who led the House Democrats' fundraising arm. Frost said many donors may not feel compelled to give money yet because the campaign is still in its early stages and no clear Republican rival has emerged.

Obama has experienced a summer lag in fundraising before. During his first presidential campaign, Obama raised about $21 million in the summer of 2007, compared with about $33 million in the spring of that year.

Messina said the campaign had not yet set a revised goal for the current fundraising period ending Sept. 30 but would urge "grass-roots fundraisers" to step up their efforts in the weeks ahead. The campaign has emphasized its large donor base - more than 550,000 people gave money during the spring - and it plans to lean heavily on small donors in August and September.

"We're going to be very aggressive in trying to find ways to engage the grass roots," Messina said. "We always said ... they're the biggest piece of this and they own the campaign and we're about to give them an even tougher assignment."

Obama signed legislation on Tuesday to raise the debt limit and avoid a government default, but the negotiations kept him in the Washington area for the past month. Obama's last fundraiser was in Philadelphia on June 30.

The campaign said the debt talks required Obama to cancel two fundraisers in Southern California and events in Northern California, Seattle, New York and Washington, D.C.

Biden had to skip fundraisers in Atlanta, Nashville, Tenn., and Dallas, while Daley canceled an event in the nation's capital. Obama's fundraiser in New York at the home of film mogul Harvey Weinstein is expected to be rescheduled for this month, while Biden's events are being rescheduled for the fall.

Obama is keeping his schedule on Wednesday, attending fundraisers in Chicago to celebrate his birthday, including a concert with Chicago natives Herbie Hancock and Jennifer Hudson and the Chicago rock band OK Go. Obama turns 50 on Thursday.

Republicans have accused the president of emphasizing campaign money over governing, criticizing plans for the lavish birthday party.

"With 9.2 percent unemployment, he could work on creating jobs, but I suppose the White House is thinking he should stick to the part of his job he really likes," Republican National Committee spokeswoman Kirsten Kukowski said.

As part of Obama's birthday events, Democratic officials and campaign aides are fanning out across the country for fundraisers: former White House press secretary Robert Gibbs and deputy campaign manager Jen O'Malley Dillon will be in Boston, White House adviser David Plouffe will be in Tampa, Fla., New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo will headline a New York City event and Obama campaign adviser David Axelrod will be in Los Angeles. Other events with Democratic surrogates will be held in Austin, Texas; Oakland, Calif.; and Washington, D.C.

Besides the birthday fundraisers, the campaign is planning hundreds of house parties around the country and has asked supporters to recruit 50 new supporters for the president's birthday.

(AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Categories: Biography, Government, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - August 03, 2011

Ill. Appellate Court Upholds Health Insurance Contract Ruling

An Illinois Appellate Court has upheld a Sangamon County judge's ruling, preventing the state from moving ahead with new health insurance contracts for state employees and retirees.

In June, a Sangamon County Circuit Judge prevented Illinois' Department of Healthcare and Family Services from dropping Urbana-based Health Alliance, leaving the health insurance policies of thousands of state workers into doubt.

Gov. Pat Quinn's administration argued the so-called 'open access' plans will save the state about $100 million a year. Health Alliance then filed suit. The 90-day extensions of current contracts granted by the Commission on Government Forecasting and Accountability are set to expire in September.

In its ruling, the 4th District Appellate Court said the state ignored a decision by that group. Champaign Senator Mike Frerichs is part of the bipartisan legislative commission. While the court's decision does not immediately impact state workers, he said it gives more fuel to additional extensions, and hopefully a long-term solution.

"I think what employees want is to be able to continue access to their health care providers, and I'm hopeful this ruling will help us get to that point," Frerichs said.

In a statement, Health Alliance CEO Jeff Ingrum called the court's ruling encouraging, with hopes that it leads to the provider remaining an option for state workers and retirees.

"This is good news for all of those who fought so hard to keep Health Alliance," Ingrum said. "We hope it leads to Health Alliance remaining an option for state workers and retirees."

The Department of Healthcare and Family Services said the state is reviewing its legal options following the court ruling.

"We remain confident in the process of awarding and contracting with the winning vendors as well as their ability to offer quality healthcare at a price that will save the state money during these tough fiscal times," said Mike Claffey, spokesman for the Department of Healthcare and Family Services.

At a COGFA hearing scheduled for Aug. 16 in Chicago, the panel will vote on extending the current insurance contracts through June 30, 2012. Three days later, the state will argue before the Sangamon County Judge that blocked the new contracts whether COGFA has the authority to extend the current ones.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - August 02, 2011

National Night Out’ Expands in Champaign County

A nationwide effort to raise awareness about crime and drug prevention kicks off Tuesday night in Champaign.

The annual 'National Night Out' typically lasts for a day, but this year it is being broken up into more than a dozen events throughout the month.

"Historically it's just something that's happened in Champaign, and Urbana was doing their thing, and Savoy, and so it was just a real disjointed effort," Champaign Neighborhood Coordinator John Ruffin said. "Now it's a joint effort to really focus on making sure that Champaign remains a safe and healthy community."

For the first time, workshops led by the Champaign and Urbana Police Departments and the Champaign Fire Department will be offered. Chelsea Angelo, a safety education coordinator with the city of Urbana, said she hopes this expanded role by law enforcement officials helps bridge the gap between neighborhoods and police officers.

"We're always looking for ways to bring our officers into contact with the citizens that not involving strictly enforcement," Angelo said. "We don't want them to only see our officers when there is an emergency situation going on."

The 'National Night Out' kicks off Tuesday at 6pm at the Champaign City Hall. More information about other activities planned can be found on the city of Champaign's website.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - August 02, 2011

Democrat Gregg Formalizes Run for Ind. Governor

Former Indiana House Speaker John Gregg said Tuesday he would focus on rejuvenating the state's manufacturing base if he is elected governor next November.

Gregg said he would attempt to lure wind-turbine manufacturers to the state as part of his strategy to revitalize the state's crumbling manufacturing base.

"We've got to a manufacturing base, we have a workforce that knows how to work in manufacturing, we've got building space," he said. "You have to go out and actively pursue" manufacturers.

The Democratic candidate filed paperwork Tuesday with the state in the race to replace Republican Gov. Mitch Daniels, who can't run for a third term because of term limits. Gregg formed an exploratory committee to run for office in May and has informally campaigned across the state since then.

Gregg appears likely to win the May 2012 Democratic primary. He would then face the winner of the Republican primary in the race for governor. U.S. Rep. Mike Pence is heavily favored to win the GOP nomination over Fishers businessman Jim Wallace.

Indiana Republican Party Chairman Eric Holcomb said Gregg's ebullient personality hides a disastrous record as speaker from 1996 to 2002. He noted that Gregg presided over major increases in government spending, though Gregg responded that a Republican-dominated Indiana Senate also approved those budgets.

"John Gregg would light up Leno or Letterman, but his record as former Speaker of the House is no laughing matter," Holcomb said.

Gregg said the governor's race should focus on the future, not the past, and that means job-creation. The state's residents are looking for more of the well-paying manufacturing jobs the state has bled over the last few decades, he said.

Tools for luring wind-turbine component manufacturers to Indiana could include tax credits and speeding approval of state permits, he said.

Pence has said he will not outline specific policies until after the May 2012 Republican primary - on the assumption he wins the contest. He has however generally said he would like to build on Daniels' successes and that he would support bringing more charter schools to the state.

Wallace has said he wants to spend $500 million more on transportation projects, cut $6 billion from the budget and grant more taxing authority to localities.

Categories: Biography, Government, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - August 02, 2011

Ill. Senators Support Debt Compromise, Ind. Senators Divided

Illinois' two U.S. senators cast their votes for the debt ceiling bill signed by President Obama moments after its Senate passage. But on the Senate floor Tuesday morning, Illinois Sen. Mark Kirk said the agreement is only a short term fix.

"This bill prevents a crisis from breaking out this week," Kirk said. "It also begins to control automatic spending programs, many of whom (sic) have run without accountability since the 1960s. All of this is a down payment on further ways to bring common sense, accountability and control to the spending of our government."

Illinois' other senator, Democrat Dick Durbin, was acting as Senate president as the bill passed - he's been a longtime proponent of a bipartisan compromise. Indiana's two GOP senators split their votes - Richard Lugar voted in favor of the bill, Dan Coats voted against.

Categories: Economics, Government, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - August 02, 2011

First-Year Academies Hope to Give Struggling Freshmen a Lift at Parkland

Champaign's Parkland College is hoping to spur student success by getting them together in similar interest groups.

Learning communities are groups of students working on the same goals together. For instance, some of this fall's incoming freshman class at Parkland will take part in groups dedicated to helping African-American males, transferring to the University of Illinois and advancing to Parkland's health professions programs.

Amy Penne is leading the three First Year Academies. She said working together in one social group on the same courses is a good step up to college life for some freshmen.

"What we're hoping to see is a successful transition for some of these students who may have struggled a bit," Penne said. "We want to see them stay in school and move toward academic success."

Just over a dozen students are in each academy this fall, taking certain courses together. Penne hopes the concept can branch out to cover new interest groups over time.

Categories: Education
Tags: education

AP - Illinois Public Media News - August 02, 2011

Stephens Resigns After 27 Years in Illinois House

Republican Ron Stephens is resigning from the Illinois House seat he's held for 27 years.

Stephens has been the senior GOP member of the House. The Greenville Republican says he's stepping down for personal reasons.

Stephens has represented the 102nd House District, which covers all or parts of Bond, Clinton, Madison, St. Clair, Effingham, Fayette and Shelby counties. His term would have expired in January 2013.

His resignation means that Republican Party chairmen in his district will pick someone to serve the remainder of Stephens' term.

Categories: Biography, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - August 02, 2011

Quinn Won’t Take a Stand on Tollway Hikes

Illinois Governor Pat Quinn will not say whether he thinks the state tollway should increase rates.

The Illinois Tollway says the plan is necessary to pay for a $12 billion project to repair and expand Chicago-area expressways. When pressed by reporters, Quinn refused to take a stand on the issue.

"We're going to let the whole process take forward," Quinn said. "The Tollway has a board; they're going to have public hearings, and I think that's a healthy thing, to have the public have a chance to speak."

The Tollway Board is scheduled to vote on a plan by Aug. 25. If it passed, toll hikes would take effect starting next year. Officials said the proposed increase would probably be between 40 to 75 cents.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - August 02, 2011

Urbana Council Passes Measure Targeting ‘Aggressive’ Solicitation

A watered-down version of what began as a panhandling ordinance has been approved by the Urbana City Council.

The measure that passed on a 5-to-1 vote Monday night instead bans what's called 'aggressive solicitation,' or those who ask for money in a threatening or intimidating matter. The new ordinance removed portions that banned any requests for donations in the Philo Road Business District.

Alderwoman Diane Marlin said those who aggressively beg in that area have brought one unintended consequence.

"Basically, people who have been approached, or aggressively solicited or felt threatened, their reaction is to just stop patronizing businesses where this occured," she said. "That's a survival tactic."

The new measure still prohibits solicitation near an ATM or bank. Public opponents, including resident Ron Custer, argue that laws already on the books in Urbana should handle what the council is trying to address. Custer is one of several opponents who has come out in the last few weeks to speak out about the issue.

"I mean, when we hear anecdotes of somebody being terrorized in their car, and somebody else saying 'oh this happens routinely,'" Custer said. "Doesn't that sound like something that could have been responded to effectively by now?"

Opponents also say the original ordinance unfairly targeted poor people, and didn't distinguish from those who intimidated from those who casually ask for money.

One change to the new ordinance allows violators to perform community service as an alternative to paying a fine. That's an idea welcomed by Alderman Eric Jakobsson.

"That certainly will not dilute what we're hoping to acheive with this, whether we achieve it or not," Jakobsson said. "It definitely moves it in a direction of actually even being more than a deterrent, but being a positive outreach, to the extent that that's possible."

City council members will do an 18-month review in Jan. 2013. Alderwoman Heather Stevenson voted down the measure, saying the issue weighs heavily on civil liberties. She suggested that the public as well as police officers should learn more about existing laws.

Mayor Laurel Prussing and Alderman Dennis Roberts did not attend Monday's council meeting.


Page 597 of 849 pages ‹ First  < 595 596 597 598 599 >  Last ›