Illinois Public Media News

AP - Illinois Public Media News - February 18, 2011

Litigation Over Airport Expansion Delayed Again

There's another delay in litigation over O'Hare International Airport expansion that pits United and American airlines against the city of Chicago.

A statement Friday from United Airlines and American says a new five-day delay will give the parties more time to resolve their differences over the financing and timing of construction of new runways and other improvements at O'Hare.

It says the latest delay comes at the request of U.S. Department of Transportation. The agency has been trying to mediate an agreement.

On Thursday, the sides asked a judge to lift a one-week delay on hearing the airlines' lawsuit that opposes the issuing of bonds for the expansion.

Mayor Richard Daley has accused the airlines of reneging on their promise in 2001 to help see through the overhaul of O'Hare.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - February 18, 2011

Democrats in Ill. Welcome Wisc. Lawmakers

(With additional reporting from NPR, Illinois Public Radio, The Associated Press)

Fourteen Democratic state lawmakers from Wisconsin are hiding in Illinois to avoid a vote on a controversial bill that would strip some public workers in their state of collective bargaining rights.

Democrats who fled Wisconsin to block a vote on the sweeping anti-union bill could stay in hiding for days or even weeks. The bill has drawn thousands of protesters to the state Capitol in Madison, Wis. Republican leaders said they expected Wisconsin residents would be pleased with the savings the bill would achieve - $30 million by July 1 and $300 million over the next two years.

Republicans hold 19 Senate seats but are one vote short of the 20 votes necessary to conduct business. The anti-union measure needs 17 votes to pass.

State Sen. Jon Erpenback (D-Middleton), who was among those who fled, said Friday that the group was prepared to be away for weeks, although he would like the standoff to end as soon as possible.

"This was an extreme action, but the legislation, we feel, was much more extreme," Erpenbach said.

Illinois Senate President John Cullerton praised his fellow Democrats from north of the border for delaying the vote, which would almost certainly pass the state's heavily-Republican legislature. Meanwhile, Illinois Governor Pat Quinn had a warm welcome for the political refugees.

"We want to assure the people of Wisconsin that we're their friends," Quinn said. "We're always available here in Illinois if they'd like to visit and stay a while until (Gov. Walker) comes to his senses."

Wisconsin's Republican Governor Scott Walker said the Democrats should return to Madison and face the vote.

"The state senators who are hiding out down in Illinois should show up for work, have their say, have their vote, add their amendments," Walker told CBS' The Early Show on Friday. "But in the end, we've got a $3.6 billion budget deficit we've got to balance."

Although Walker called the Democrats' flight a stunt, many protesters at the Capitol saw it differently. School guidance counselor Saunnie Yelton-Stanley called their disappearance "brilliant."

"The fact that the Democrats have walked out, it shows they're listening to us," said Neil Graupner, a 19-year-old technical college student from Madison, as he prepared to spend the night at the Capitol on Thursday.

Erpenbach said he is meeting with the other refugee Democrats to decide what to do next - though he's not sure how long they will remain on the lam.

I mean I wish I was home tonight in my own bed," he said. "It's Friday night in Wisconsin that's fish fry night. You now, I really wish I was back home. So hopefully we'll get back home soon, but in the mean time, this is up to the governor.

Categories: Economics, Government, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - February 17, 2011

Kids Count Study Shows Childhood Poverty on the Rise in Champaign County

Amid the highs and lows of Illinois' uncertain economy, a new report says Champaign County has followed a decade-long trend of increased childhood poverty.

The "Great at Eight" report, released by Voices for Illinois Children, focused on the resources children up until the age of eight need to succeed. The report's authors say at this age "children should be ready to shift from learning to read to reading to learn."

The study finds from 1999-2000, the childhood poverty rate in Champaign County was 14.3 percent, slightly below the statewide average of 14.8 percent. In 2008-2009, the county's child poverty rate went up to 18.9 percent, compared with 17.8 percent statewide.

Meanwhile, math and reading scores for 3rd graders on the Illinois Standards Achievement Test in Urbana and Champaign Schools last year were below the state average.

The authors of the report say the state fiscal crisis threatens an array of services, including early childhood education, mental health care, and family support. Beverley Baker, the director of Community Impact with the United Way of Champaign County, said she agrees that programs critical to a child's development are at risk, which is why she said state funding is making it more difficult to rely on Illinois for support.

"Each local community is going to have to look inward," she said. "There's no way we can replace what the state government does, but I think we're going to have to be creative, and we're going to have to pool our local resources to see what we can do."

The report acknowledges that there will likely be more spending cuts, as the recent income tax increase is not enough to close Illinois' budget gap.

In the last year, low-income students represented more than half of the enrollment at Champaign Unit 4 and Urbana School District 116. Unit 4 School board member Sue Gray said the school district is looking to trim up to $2 million from its $100 million budget, a task she said will not be taken lightly.

The School Board plans to hold a public meeting Tuesday, February 22 at 6pm at the Mellon Building in Champaign to seek community input on how to make those cuts.

(Graphic courtesy of Voices for Illinois Children)


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - February 17, 2011

Old, Unsafe Ammo Wanted for Disposal in Douglas County

The Douglas County Sheriff's Department is looking for your old or unsafe ammunition. They are holding an ammo disposal event this weekend in Tuscola, and offering to safely dispose of any ammunition that you no longer want, or is too old to use.

Chief Deputy Peter Buckley said they have made arrangements with the Explosives Ordinance Disposal unit of the University of Illinois Police, for the safe disposal of any ammunition that's brought into the center.

"They have some experts in the field of recovering unused ammunition and the proper disposal of that, and they've agreed to assist us," Buckley said.

Buckley said the ammo disposal event will be taking pistol and rifle rounds, shotgun shells, old black powder, shot shell primers and reloading supplies. He said if you have a device with a blasting cap or some other ordinance, you should call ahead before bringing it in. You don't have to be a Douglas County resident to drop off ammo, and you don't have to have an FOID card.

The disposal event runs Friday through Sunday, February 18-20, from 8 AM to 9 PM, at the Douglas County Sheriff's Office, at 920 South Washington in Tuscola.

Categories: Government, Politics
Tags: government

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - February 17, 2011

Governor Pat Quinn Introduces New Budget Plan

Getting more revenue for the state was the main goal of Governor Pat Quinn's previous budget addresses. But this year, with a new income tax hike in effect, Quinn on Wednesday made no such pitch. The Governor mentioned a few new initiatives ... such as efforts to attract start-up companies to Illinois, and to double the state's exports. But the governor says the main focus of his proposed spending plan is exercising spending restraint. As Illinois Public Radio's Amanda Vinicky reports ... for some, the cuts Quinn has proposed don't go far enough. Others call them devastating.

(Photo courtesy of Chris Eaves)

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WILL - Illinois Public Media News - February 17, 2011

Single Engine Plane Crashes in Urbana

The pilot of a single-engine plane was sent to the hospital with minor injuries, after his plane crashed Thursday morning at a home located north of Urbana.

The accident happened at the home of Steve and Brenda Rice on East Oaks Road, about a half-mile from Frasca Field. Steve Rice was inside his house at the time, and said he believes the plane glanced off the side of his house in the crash. He said the crash shook the house, and made a sound like a bomb going off.

"I really thought a truck had hit the house or something," Rice said. "So I went around to the front of the house, and there was a propeller in the front yard. And I walked around to the east side of the house, and there was a plane up against the east side of the house there. The engine was out of it, wings torn off."

Rice says he found the pilot, Daniel Folk, to be conscious and coherent, with the only visible injuries being a couple of cuts on his head. Folk was taken to Carle Foundation Hospital for treatment.

Champaign County Sheriff's Captain Tim Voges says that according to Tom Frasca at Frasca Field, the accident occurred while Folk was practicing landing in a crosswind. While preparing for a 2nd try at a landing, Folk banked to the north, but apparently failed to gain altitude. The wing of his plane caught in a field, flipping it over into the yard of the Rice's home. The accident is being investigated by the F-A-A.

NOTE: This story was updated to include more information from the Champaign County Sheriff's Department about the crash.

Categories: Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - February 17, 2011

Blagojevich Attorneys Want Seal Lifted on Evidence

Attorneys for impeached Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich have continued their barrage of pretrial motions with a new one asking a judge to lift a court-ordered seal on all evidence, including FBI wiretap recordings.

The seven-page motion filed early Thursday argues the order barring the public release of evidence impairs Blagojevich more than prosecutors and creates what it calls "a fundamentally unfair playing field."

The filing also accuses the government of releasing out-of-context tape excerpts before the first trial that "poisoned the jury pool."

Blagojevich's initial trial ended in August with the jury deadlocked on 23 of 24 charges. A retrial is set to start April 20.

Only a small percentage of the wiretap recordings were played at the first trial. The rest are barred from release by the seal order.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - February 16, 2011

After Tax Hike, Quinn Budget Offers More Pain

Gov. Pat Quinn presented lawmakers with a budget proposal Wednesday that would increase state spending overall while skimping on human services and borrowing billions of dollars to pay old bills.

Among the spending cuts -- just a month after Quinn approved a major income tax increase -- are programs helping the elderly buy medicine, payments for medical services to the poor and money to hire new state troopers.

The Chicago Democrat described his plan as a frugal, even painful, step toward getting Illinois out of its cavernous budget hole.

"Our commitment to taxpayers is simple: We will only use tax dollars to provide necessary services. All unnecessary state spending will be eliminated," Quinn said in a speech to the General Assembly.

Republicans immediately said Quinn wasn't living up to that promise. They noted the key measure of state spending would increase by $1.7 billion, to about $35.4 billion.

"We got into this mess because we spent money we didn't have and it's just a continuation. It's the same old song," said House Minority Leader Tom Cross, R-Oswego.

Even Quinn's fellow Democrats questioned his budget math, suggesting that he proposes paying some upcoming expenses with money that isn't available or should be used to pay bills that are past due.

His plan also came under fire from groups that count on state money to provide services to the poor and sick.

Hospital and nursing home groups criticized Quinn's proposal to cut Medicaid rates by $552 million, or about 5 percent. Bob Hedges, president of the Illinois Health Care Association, called it "a terrible blow to our seniors, employees, families and communities."

Quinn spared education from dramatic cuts, but Voices for Illinois Children said his plan appears to slash after-school and mental health programs that keep children out of trouble.

"When the school bell rings, kids still have needs," said the group's policy director, Sean Noble.

The tax increase Quinn approved should generate about $6.8 billion in the budget year that begins July 1, but that's not nearly enough to put state government back in the black.

Quinn's aides say the increased spending in his proposal is a result of using the new income tax to cover the rising cost of services or pay for items neglected in past budgets. They said the spending plan includes more than $1 billion in cuts.

Even with the tax increase, Illinois has $9 billion or $10 billion in overdue bills that must be paid, Quinn's budget director David Vaught said. The governor's plan to pay those bills could be the most contentious part of budget negotiations.

Quinn and Democratic legislative leaders want to borrow $8.7 billion to pay off overdue bills. Instead of informally borrowing money simply by not paying its bills, the state would sell bonds and pay the debt over 14 years.

The governor maintains that this step, which technically would take place in the current budget year, would be fair to the state's vendors and good for the economy.

"We have the opportunity to jump-start our economy by paying our vendors today -- an immediate injection of billions into our economy," Quinn said in his 27-minute speech, during which he wore a sash known as a kente cloth to mark Black History Month.

Republicans called for more spending cuts before any borrowing.

"I don't think the public understands after the single biggest tax increase that we've had in the state of Illinois, that now you want to go borrow over $8 billion," Republican Comptroller Judy Baar Topinka said. "We have to clean up our act and get the budget into compliance first."

Democrats also questioned parts of Quinn's proposal. House Speaker Michael Madigan said the proposal appears to include $720 million from two technical tax changes that have not been approved, violating new policies meant to control spending.

"I'm confident that we will work our way through these differences, but my commitment in Illinois budget-making this year is to live within those spending controls," Madigan, D-Chicago, said in an interview with the public television show "Illinois Lawmakers."

And Senate President John Cullerton said Quinn seems to be using borrowed money to pay for upcoming expenses, instead of devoting it solely to overdue bills.

Still, Cullerton, D-Chicago, saved his sharpest remarks for the GOP officials who oppose borrowing to pay what Illinois owes to businesses, community groups and charities.

"If Republicans are willing to have a conversation that doesn't start with 'No,' I'm ready to listen," Cullerton said in a statement.

Quinn also called for consolidating some of the state's 868 school districts and said he wants a commission to study the always-contentious issue. He predicted taxpayers could save $100 million by merging small districts.

He proposed a major cut in state support for local schools' bus costs and he called for eliminating regional offices of education for a savings of $14 million.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - February 16, 2011

Pavement Collapse Forces Closure in Downtown Champaign

Part of Market Street in downtown Champaign was closed Wednesday morning, after the pavement collapsed.

The section of Market Street between Logan and Bailey runs past the Illinois Terminal Building, and is heavily traveled by both buses and motorists using the Terminal Building's parking lot.

City Operations Manager Tom Schuh said the collapse was due to the failure of the material packed underneath the street's original brick pavement. He said the collapsed produced a series of depressions in the street, cracking and displacing the asphalt surface.

Schuh said it will take until Friday for a crew to rebuild the roughly 50-foot section of Market Street. Until then, he says that section of Market Street is closed to all but parking lot traffic.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - February 16, 2011

Bookseller in Normal May Change Plans in Wake of Border’s Bankruptcy

The announced closure of the Border's store in Normal could change the approach of a locally owned bookstore. Sarah Lindenbaum manages Babbitt's books, located near Illinois State University.

She says her store, which sells solely used books, has been anticipating the Border's closing. Lindenbaum said her store buys a lot of trade paperbacks that customers have bought at Border's.

"Are people going to be bringing as many?," she said. "But again, there are still bookstores in Peoria, there's still Barnes and Noble in Bloomington. And another thing we've discussed as far as what would happen if Border's closes, and maybe even Barnes and Noble, is would we start to stock new books and try to capitalize on that."

Lindenbaum said if her store did sell new books, it would take more than a year before those sales could take place. She said Babbitt's took a dip with the recession, but has rebounded lately, and has retained all of its regular customers. And Lindenbaum said she thinks there will continue to be a market for modern first editions and collectable books.

Categories: Economics, Education

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