Illinois Public Media News

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - March 01, 2011

Carle to Open Surgical Residency Program

Urbana's Carle Foundation Hospital will add a new educational component to its surgery department over the next few months.

Carle is accepting about a half-dozen surgical residents - the program is being set up in cooperation with the University of Illinois' College of Medicine, but it's attracting new surgeons from across the country.

Dr. John Aucar is the director of the residency program. He says it will mean more work for Carle's medical staff, but the end result will be a benefit for everyone. "It also carries a responsibility to spend time and effort teaching and preparing the residents for independent practice in the future. Like always, teaching is an activity that takes some time and attention," said Aucar. "The benefit is that the residents can also help you get your work done and take care of patients."

Aucar says Carle will also follow a higher set of standards for clinical care quality under its new educational role.

Carle already offers residencies in its Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, and oral/facial surgery departments. Aucar says as many as 12 surgical residents could be in the general surgery program in the next three years.

Categories: Education, Health

AP - Illinois Public Media News - March 01, 2011

Monken Confirmed by Ill. Lawmakers to Head Emergency Management Agency

After months of controversy, the former Illinois State Police Interim Director officially has a new job. State senators on Tuesday confirmed Governor Pat Quinn's appointment of Jonathon Monken as director of the Emergency Management Agency.

Monken had served nearly two years as head of the State Police, a position Quinn selected him for despite Monken not having any background in law enforcement. He was never confirmed for that job. Monken said he tried to ignore the controversy.

"Really, what it comes down to is I tried to remove myself from that situation as much as possible and focus my attention on doing what my job was and focusing my attention on doing as well as I could for the state Police and for the state and for the governor," Monken said.

Senators overwhelmingly approved Monken for his new position. Only one voted against him. Monken touts his military experience in Iraq and Kosovo as his qualifications for the post. He says his time at the state police will serve him well in the new job.

Categories: Government, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - March 01, 2011

Indiana House Leaders Could Meet Wednesday During Legislative Impasse

Indiana House Minority Leader Pat Bauer said he and Republican House Speaker Brian Bosma are discussing a plan to meet Wednesday.

More than 30 Indiana House Democrats have stayed at Urbana's Comfort Suites since last Tuesday night following a legislative impasse that started over opposition to right to work legislation and bills impacting education.

Bauer acknowledged that there has been 'movement' between both parties, and he said he believes there's room for more of it.

"We don't negotiate, and that's the final deal," he said. "We have to take it to our caucuses. This is the traditional way of doing things."

Bauer said any meeting that takes place with Bosma needs to include discussion on the compromises the Democrats are seeking over a number of bills. Bauer said the House Speaker has spoken favorably over some of the amendments Democrats have offered, but is not willing to talk about every measure, like a voucher bill that would use taxpayer money to help parents send kids to private schools.

Bauer said if he does meet with Bosma, the Democratic caucus would stay in Illinois.

(Photo by Jeff Bossert/WILL)

Categories: Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - March 01, 2011

Blagojevich Jury Holds Reunion

The jury foreman at impeached Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich's first trial says jurors recently held a reunion to reminisce about the sometimes stressful, 2 1/2-month trial.

James Matsumoto tells the Associated Press seven jurors and five alternates met in February at a winery/restaurant in suburban Chicago.

Matsumoto says most jurors felt they did their best during 14 days of deliberations _ though some regretted they deadlocked on 23 of 24 counts. A retrial starts on April 20.

Matsumoto says one juror described shopping at Target recently when Blagojevich's wife Patti recognized her as a juror, walked over and struck up a conversation.

He says a lone holdout juror who prevented conviction on several serious charges helped organize the union but, at the last minute, wasn't able to attend.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - March 01, 2011

Chicago Police Chief Walks on Last Day of Contract

(With additional reporting from the Associated Press)

Chicago Police Superintendent Jody Weis is leaving his job immediately and won't stay on for two more months as Mayor Richard Daley had asked him to do.

Chicago Alderman Anthony Beale confirmed the move Tuesday and says former Superintendent Terry Hillard will take over in the interim.

The embattled Weis is a former FBI agent who was hired by Daley three years ago. He's known for months that none of the major mayoral candidates, including Mayor-elect Rahm Emanuel, planned to extend his contract.

Daley on Monday told reporters he hoped Weis would stay until Daley's term ends in May. But Weis, whose 3-year contract ends Tuesday, decided to leave immediately after he was not given a written contract extension.

When it came to replacing Weis, Daley turned to former Superintendent Terry Hillard.

Hillard was police superintendent from 1998 to 2003. He served with the police department for 35 years before retiring in 2003. He became the department's first black chief of detectives in 1995, holding that position until he was promoted to superintendent.

Hillard is currently a partner at Hillard Heintze, a private security and investigations firm. He will take a leave of absence from his company.

Daley says Hillard will serve as interim superintendent beginning Wednesday until the end of Daley's term in May.

(Photo courtesy of Illinois Public Radio)


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - March 01, 2011

Flash Index Improvement Colored by Tax Hike Revenue

The Flash Index of the Illinois economy reached 96.1 in February --- the first time it's broken 96 in two years. The increase from January's reading of 95.9 is small --- just one fifth of a point. And its accuracy is a little shakier than usual, due to the state income tax increase.

The Flash Index is based on an analysis of Illinois state income and sales tax revenue. With revenue from the new state tax hike beginning to come in, Fred Giertz said he can't be certain how much of the higher revenues in February were from the tax hike, and how much was from higher economic activity. Still, the University of Illinois economist said he is pretty sure the Illinois economy showed some improvement.

"Less sure than in a typical month, but relatively sure, because the changes seem to correspond with what I predicted in terms of the change in the tax revenue," Giertz said. "So it seems to be reasonable. But again, there's a bigger chance for imprecision or error this month, compared to other months."

The Flash Index February reading of 96.1 does not yet show actual growth in the Illinois economy. To do that, the Index has to break 100.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - March 01, 2011

Film Recalls Player and Coach’s Contributions to the Game of Baseball

Buck O'Neil is regarded today as an ambassador to baseball history, particularly that of the Negro Leagues.

The 16-year veteran with the Kansas City Monarchs went on to become the first black coach in the major leagues, joining the Chicago Cubs organization in the early 60's, but he also was a Negro League manager and big league scout.

A documentary by a Champaign physician sheds new light on the legend's contributions to Chicago's rich baseball history. Illinois Public Media's Jeff Bossert talks with Dr. David Fletcher, the man behind plans for a Chicago Baseball Museum, about how Buck O'Neil's contributions to the game are helping that effort.

Download mp3 file
Categories: History, Sports
Tags: history, sports

AP - Illinois Public Media News - March 01, 2011

Daley, Mayors Nationwide Pushing National Gun Legislation

Chicago Mayor Richard Daley is joining with 550 mayors nationwide in calling for stricter national gun laws.

He is part of the group Mayors Against Illegal Guns, a national political movement seeking to push two initiatives through Congress. They want a comprehensive national database of people who are prohibited from buying guns and they want every gun sale to be subject to a background check.

Daley says he doesn't understand why this kind of legislation has been so hard to pass.

"There's something wrong with America," Daley said. "I don't understand it. It's not just elected officials, it's people in general. They are not outraged about this."

Daley said Americans ought to be ashamed by gun violence.

He made his comments near a truck sponsored by the group Mayor's Against Illegal Guns. The truck keeps a running tally of American's killed with guns since the Tucson shootings in early January. At the beginning of the press conference the digital display read 1,731. By the end, two more people had been added to that tally.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - March 01, 2011

Former Gov. Ryan Explains Why He Emptied Death Row

Former Illinois Gov. George Ryan says two people helped him make his historic decision clear the state's death row in 2003: An innocent man who was once two days away from being executed and a childhood friend who asked if Ryan was going to allow his son to be put to death.

Ryan's comments came last March in a deposition taken at a federal prison in Indiana, where Ryan has been locked up since late 2007 after his conviction of corruption charges. The deposition was released to the Chicago Sun-Times and the Chicago Tribune after the newspapers filed freedom of information requests.

Under questioning by a city of Chicago attorney, Ryan angrily denied his decision had anything to do with the federal probe that led to his conviction.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - February 28, 2011

Reading Lincoln Speech Aloud Falls Short of Record

Abraham Lincoln fans have failed, again, to set a new world record.

State officials had hoped to break the record for the most people reading aloud at the same time. They organized a mass reading of Lincoln's Farewell Address two weeks ago, with people across the country taking part.

But as numbers come in, it's clear the event drew only a fraction of the people needed. Organizers tell The (Springfield) State Journal-Register that the total so far is about 13,000, while the world record is 223,363.

An attempt to break the record last year by reading the Gettysburg Address out loud also failed to set a record, but it came much closer. That event had about 180,000 people.


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