Illinois Public Media News

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - February 11, 2011

U of I Professor Stresses Patience for Egyptians for a Post-Mubarak Government

A University of Illinois professor who formerly lived in Egypt says the sudden departure of Hosni Mubarak will now mean patience on the part of people there to see what kind of government develops.

Sociology and Middle East studies professor Asef Bayat said this quick transition of Mubarak handing power to the military didn't allow for another power to shadow the president, or form some type of alternative governing body.

"One has to really wait and see how the negotiations will start, and whether or not the army would be willing to really move the country into a democracy after a transitional period, and step back and remain as a kind of neutral body," Bayat said.

Bayat said there has been a large expectation of a 'honeymoon' with Mubarak's resignation. But he said in recent weeks, there has been a realization among Egypt's people that Mubarak's departure alone isn't enough. Bayat said he is now seeing a lot of banners calling for the entire regime to step down.

"While the slogans by and large focused on his (Mubarak's) departure, now I have seen a lot of banners and slogans basically saying that the regime should go, and that's a big, big difference from the past," he said.

Bayet said Egypt should look beyond any operators of power who revolved around Mubarek and his type of parliament. He also said there's a lack of coordination between different organs of power, and that was evident when the chief of the Egyptian army showed support for Mubarak following the Thursday address, just before he would announce he was stepping down.

Categories: Education, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - February 11, 2011

NPR’s Al Letson Reflects on the Life of Bayard Rustin

It's Black History Month, and Al Letson, who's the host of NPR's State of the Re:Union, recently finished a documentary honoring the life of someone who he calls the most important civil rights figure with very little name recognition. Bayard Rustin was involved in the freedom rides, he served as the chief architect of the March on Washington, and by the end of his life, he became influential in the gay rights movement.

Al Letson was in Champaign this week to talk about Rustin's legacy, and he spoke with Illinois Public Media's Sean Powers.

(Photo courtesy of Warren Leffler)

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Categories: Civil Rights, Education

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - February 10, 2011

Disabled Advocate ‘Humbled’ by State’s Highest Award

A longtime advocate for the rights of disabled people says he's 'humbled and proud' to be named to the list of Lincoln Academy Laureates.

Tim Nugent founded the University of Illinois' Division of Disability Resources and Educational Services in 1948, and has since developed standards for handicapped accessibility. Nugent's ideas started with building ramps for injured World War II veterans. He was teaching health education at the U of I's former campus in Galesburg when it closed in 1949.

With no plans to transfer disabled students to Urbana, Nugent said that prompted rallies on the campus and in Springfield. He compares the effort to what African-Americans have gone through in this country.

"It wasn't until recently that they had full privileges," Nugent said. "And they were going through the same thing. It's a natural phenomenon when you bring out something new or different. People question it, people challenge it. And that's what proves its merit."

Nugent says he's worked with many Lincoln laureates, including Urbana native and film critic Roger Ebert, and is happy to be joining their ranks. He'll receive Order of Lincoln award in April 16th ceremonies at the U of I's Krannert Center for the Performing Arts along with five other people, including Flex-N-Gate Corporation President Shahid Khan.

(Photo courtesy of the University of Illinois)

Categories: Education, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - February 10, 2011

Ill. State Police Pick to Keep Job

Illinois senators haven't quite given up hope of voting on Gov. Pat Quinn's nominee to head the state police.

An aide to Senate President John Cullerton initially said Thursday there was no way to hold a confirmation hearing before time ran out and nominee Jonathon Monken officially got the job.

But Rikeesha Phelon later said Senate leaders had begun considering a hearing next Wednesday, the last day possible.

Nominees are automatically confirmed if the Senate doesn't hold a vote within 60 session days. The deadline was also complicated by the fact that Monken was nominated during a legislative session that ended last month.

Monken is 31 and has no law enforcement experience, but he has served as acting director of state police for nearly two years.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - February 09, 2011

Brenda Starr Columnist Reflects On Comic Strip’s Legacy

If you read the newspaper comics pages, you may have noticed the decline of the story strip. In January, "Brenda Starr, Reporter" disappeared from the comics pages, some 70 years after its creation by the late Dale Messick.

Its syndicator, Tribune Media Services, decided to end the strip, rather than replace Mary Schmich, the Chicago Tribune columnist who decided to leave "Brenda Starr" after writing it for 25 years (her collaborator for the past 15 years was artist June Brigman).

Schmich said she hopes Brenda Starr returns some day, but admits there is no future for the newspaper story strip as a format. Illinois Public Media's Jim Meadows spoke with Schmich about Brenda Starr's unique position as a woman-produced comic strip about a woman reporter.

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Categories: Biography, History, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - February 09, 2011

Decatur Prison Keeps Mother-Child Bond Intact for Some Inmates

A women's prison in Decatur allows a handful of its inmates to raise their newborns while serving out their sentences. It's the only program of its kind in the state, and as Illinois Public Media's Sean Powers reports, it appears to be advancing the cause of rehabilitation and growth.

(Photo by Sean Powers/WILL)

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AP - Illinois Public Media News - February 09, 2011

Immigration Reform Debate Lands in Indiana Statehouse

Dozens of people have lined up to speak to Indiana lawmakers about a proposal that its sponsor says would lead to an Arizona-style crackdown on illegal immigration in the state.

Sponsor Republican Sen. Mike Delph of Carmel opened a public hearing Wednesday by saying those from other countries have an obligation to follow U.S. laws. Supporters testify that illegal immigrants have been taking jobs from Indiana residents and that the state has the right to enforce immigration laws because federal officials had failed.

Opponents outside the Senate chamber have held signs such as "Welcome to Indiana ... where you will be racially profiled."

State Attorney General Greg Zoeller earlier Wednesday expressed reservations about the proposal, saying Indiana shouldn't try to assume authority over what is a federal responsibility.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - February 09, 2011

Corn Reserves Hit Over-15-Year Low, Could Raise Prices for Food, Ethanol

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is reporting that reserves of corn have hit their lowest level in over 15 years.

The high demand for corn could put upward pressure on food prices in 2011.

Demand for corn in the ethanol industry is up 50 million bushels after record-high production in December and January, according to the USDA.

That has left the United States with the lowest surplus of corn since 1996.

Scott Gerlt, a crop analyst with the University of Missouri, said high corn prices could increase the cost on everything from ethanol to food and feed.

"The corn market is definitely a changing market," Gerlt said. "With ethanol policy we have a lot more demand and so we are going to have a lot more pressure on prices. Because even though we have a lot of supply there's just so much demand a lot of that supply is getting used up and we're just not left with much at the end of the day."

Corn prices have already doubled in the last six months, rising from $3.50 a bushel to more than $7 a bushel.

(Photo courtesy of Artotem/Flickr)

Categories: Business, Economics, Health

AP - Illinois Public Media News - February 09, 2011

State Farm Retirees Losing Some Medical Coverage

State Farm Insurance Cos. will stop providing supplemental medical coverage for its Medicare-eligible retirees next year in a cost-cutting move.

The Bloomington-based company says it will instead help them find supplemental Medicare coverage and provide them with $200 a month to help. It wasn't immediately clear how many of the company's 28,700 retirees the move will affect.

State Farm also will make changes in the availability of retirement health care for current and future employees. People hired after this year, for instance, will have to pay for all of their own retirement medical insurance.

State Farm spokesman Phil Supple told The Pantagraph newspaper in Bloomington that growing medical claims have driven up the company's health care costs.

Many companies have announced similar changes in recent years.

Categories: Economics, Health

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - February 09, 2011

Two CU Residents Among Next Order of Lincoln Recipients

The achievements of two Champaign-Urbana residents have won them the state of Illinois' highest honor.

The Order of Lincoln honor is bestowed on Illinoisans who have served their communities - since it originated in 1964, it's gone to people ranging from Ronald Reagan to Gwendolyn Brooks to Walter Payton.

In April, Governor Pat Quinn will give the award to Shahid Khan, the president of the Urbana auto component company Flex-n-Gate, and to Tim Nugent, who worked for decades to make the University of Illinois and the rest of the world more accessible to people with disabilities.

Other honorees at the Krannert Center ceremony will be Chicago arts philanthropists Richard and Mary Lackritz Gray, Northwestern university law professor and former state senator Dawn Clark Netsch, and Illinois Arts Council chair Shirley Madigan.


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