Illinois Public Media News

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - April 05, 2011

Eisenhauer Wins Third Danville Mayor Term

Mayor Scott Eisenhauer brushed back three challengers to his office on Election Day, winning with 42% of the vote.

Eisenhauer beat Vermilion County Board member James "Mouse" McMahon, who received 34%. Rickey Williams Junior received 13% of the vote, followed by David Quick with 10%.

Eisenhauer says he was overwhelmed to see the support he got in his third bid for mayor. He says it was good to see that "although the community certainly doesn't like everything you do as mayor ,they at least have confidence in our team to appreciate what we've done for eight years, and more importantly the confidence that we've been moving the city in the right direction and will continue to do that over the course of next four years."

new aldermen will join the City Council under Eisenhauer, including longtime State Representative Bill Black, who retired from his post late last year. He soundly defeated incumbent 7th ward alderman Ron Candido. Kevin Davis, Michael O'Kane and Thomas Stone won seats, joining victorious incumbents Rick Strebing and Jon Cooper. City Treasurer Linda Monson defeated challenger Carol Nichols.

Categories: Government, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - April 05, 2011

Gerard Unseats Champaign Mayor Schweighart, Faraci Wins Council Term

University of Illinois employee Don Gerard will become the next mayor of Champaign, defeating three-term incumbent and retired police officer Jerry Schweighart.

Gerard picked up 51% of the vote in a race that at times had turned testy over budget issues and campaign funding.

"It's all been a process of being prepared. To see it to fruition is just remarkable," Gerard said after his win. "I think it's a real testament to our team and to the community. People really got out and supported us and worked really hard. I think we had a lot of numbers pushed up in a lot of different places, and I think we really made a statement."

Speaking by phone after the vote count, Schweighart blamed lack of union support and very low turnout in Champaign, which he called "pathetic."

When asked if he had any words of advice for the new mayor, Schweighart responded, "He's smarter than I am. I'll let him figure it out."

There was also one Champaign City Council seat left open by resignation -- state economic development official Paul Faraci has won that seat, defeating two other write-in candidates. Faraci received 787 votes to Cathy Emanuel's 518 and James McGuire's 415.

(Photo by Jeff Bossert/WILL)

Categories: Government, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - April 05, 2011

Power at Brookens Center Restored

Just hours to go before polls close, the Brookens Center in Urbana lost power, but power has now been restored.

On his Twitter page, Champaign County Clerk Gordy Hulten said all election operations after 7 PM will occur at Brokens as planned. For a short time, Hulten had said the outage may affect the release of unofficial results, but that doesn't appear to be the case anymore.

Ameren has not yet released a cause for the outage.

Polls close at 7 PM.

Categories: Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 05, 2011

Signed Jesse James Photo Sells for over $50K

A signed photo of notorious Missouri outlaw Jesse James sold at auction Tuesday for $51,240.

Leslie Hindman Auctioneers in Chicago had estimated the photograph would sell for between $20,000 and $30,000.

The photo shows James with his hair slicked back and looking away from the camera at an angle.

Underneath it's signed J.W. James.

The auction house has said it's the only known signed photo of the outlaw, but not everyone was sold on its authenticity.

Gary Chilcote, the director of the Jesse James Home Museum in St. Joseph, says the outlaw rarely signed anything.

Jesse James was shot and killed in his home in St. Joseph, Missouri in 1882 at the age of 34.

(Photo courtesy of Leslie Hindman Auctioneers)

Categories: Criminal Justice, History
Tags: crime, history

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - April 05, 2011

U of I Freshman to Enter NBA Draft

University of Illinois freshman guard/forward Jereme Richmond will enter the 2011 NBA draft, and he says he doesn't plan on returning to school

Richmond earned Big Ten All-Freshman Team honors after averaging 7.6 points and 5.0 rebounds in 31 games for the Illini during the 2010-11 season. Richmond is working out in Chicago and will weigh his options regarding signing with an agent.

"I enjoyed my time at the University of Illinois and would like to thank the coaching staff and my teammates for everything they've done for me," Richmond said. "At this time, I'm ready to follow my dreams and achieve my life-long goal of playing in the NBA."

Richmond earned Big Ten All-Freshman Team honors after averaging 7.6 points and 5.0 rebounds in 31 games for the Illini during the 2010-11 season. He shot 52.8 percent from the field and ranked third in the Big Ten in field goal shooting during conference play at 60.4 percent. Richmond scored in double figures 10 times, led by a career-high 18 points on 9-of-12 shooting against Ohio State on Jan. 22. The team's third-leading rebounder on the season, Richmond led the Illini in rebounding in six games, highlighted by a career-best 12 boards versus UIC on Dec. 18.

"Jereme is an extremely talented player who helped us at nearly every position," Illinois coach Bruce Weber said. "His versatility and ability to impact the game in a number of different areas are skills that will help him greatly as he pursues his dream of playing professional basketball."

(AP Photo/File)

Categories: Education, Sports

AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 05, 2011

Caterpillar CEO: No Plans to Leave Illinois

The head of Caterpillar says the company intends to stay in Illinois while working with the governor to improve the state's business climate.

CEO Doug Oberhelman met with Democratic Gov. Pat Quinn today to discuss a letter he recently sent Quinn. It warned that other states were trying to lure his company away because Illinois increased its income tax rate on corporations and individuals.

The Peoria-based company has more than 23,000 employees in Illinois.

Quinn says he understands Illinois must do more to improve its economy and image. He is seeking to overhaul the workers' compensation system and encourage the greater export of Illinois goods.

Oberhelman has agreed to serve on a council that will try to strengthen the export business.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 05, 2011

UConn Defeats Butler for 3rd National Title

The only thing that could stop Kemba Walker and Connecticut's amazing run was the final buzzer.

On a night when the massive arena felt like a dusty old gym, UConn made Butler look like the underdog it really was, winning the national championship Monday night with an old-fashioned, grinding 53-41 beatdown of the Bulldogs.

Walker finished with 16 points for the Huskies (32-9), who won their 11th straight game since closing the regular season with a 9-9 Big East record that foreshadowed none of this.

They closed it out with a defensive showing for the ages, holding Butler to a 12-for-64 shooting. That's 18.8 percent, the worst ever in a title game.

It was one of the ugliest games anyone can remember on the sport's biggest stage. But definitely the kind of game a grizzled old coach like Jim Calhoun could love.

At age 68, he became the oldest coach to win the NCAA championship and joined John Wooden, Adolph Rupp, Mike Krzyzewski and Bob Knight as only the fifth coach to win three NCAA titles.

"It may be the happiest moment of my life," Calhoun said.

Calhoun coaxed this win out of his team by accepting the reality that the rim looked about as wide as a pancake on a cold-shooting, defensive-minded night in Houston. He did it by making his players pound the ball inside and insisting on the kind of defense that UConn played during this remarkable run, but which often got overshadowed by Walker's theatrics.

UConn trailed 22-19 after a first half that came straight out of the '40s.

"The halftime speech was rather interesting," Calhoun said. "The adjustment was, we were going to out-will them and outwork them." And so they did.

Connecticut outscored Butler by an unthinkable 26-2 in the paint. The Bulldogs (28-10), in their second straight title game and hoping to put the closing chapter on the ultimate "Hoosiers" story, went a mind-numbing 13 minutes, 26 seconds in the second half making only one field goal.

During that time, a 25-19 lead turned into a 41-28 deficit. This for a team that never trailed Duke by more than six during last year's epic final.

That time, Gordon Hayward's desperation halfcourt heave bounced off the backboard and rim, barely missing. This time, UConn was celebrating before the buzzer sounded, Calhoun pumping his fists and hugging an assistant while the Huskies ran to the sideline and soaked in the confetti.

The version of "Hoosiers" with the happy ending is still available on DVD.

UConn, meanwhile, gets the real celebration.

"You see the tears on my face," Walker said. "I have so much joy in me, it's unreal. It's surreal. I'm so happy right now."

Joining Walker, the tournament's Most Outstanding Player, in double figures were Jeremy Lamb with 12 points, including six during UConn's pullaway run, and Alex Oriakhi with 11 points and 11 rebounds.

Just as impressive were the stats UConn piled up on defense. Four steals and 10 blocks, including four each by Oriakhi and Roscoe Smith, and a total clampdown of Butler's biggest stars, Matt Howard and Shelvin Mack. Howard went 1 for 13 and Mack went 4 for 15.

"You just hope the shots go in," Butler guard Zach Hahn said. "That's how it's been all tournament. Whenever we needed a big shot, somebody came up with it. I guess we just ran out of steam. Nobody could make 'em."

Butler's 41 points were 10 points fewer than the worst showing in the shot-clock era in a championship game. (Michigan scored 51 in a loss to Duke in 1992), and the 18.8 percent shooting broke a record that had stood since 1941.

"Without question, 41 points and 12 of 64 is not good enough to win any game, let alone the national championship," Butler coach Brad Stevens said.

While Stevens made history by doing it "The Butler Way" and bringing this school with 4,500 students within a win of the championship for two straight years, UConn played big-boy basketball in a big-boy league and suffered through some big-time problems.

Aside from the .500 Big East record, it was a rough year off the court for the Huskies and their coaching lifer, whose season was tarnished by an NCAA investigation that found Calhoun failed to create an atmosphere of compliance in the program. He admitted he wasn't perfect and has begrudgingly accepted the three-game suspension he'll have to serve when the conference season starts next year.

Then again, given this performance, it's clear UConn does its best work when it's all-or-nothing, one-and-done.

Counting three wins at the Maui Invitational, Connecticut finished 14-0 in tournament games this year - including an unprecedented five-wins-in-five-nights success at the Big East tournament, then six games - two each week - in the one that really counts, one of the most unpredictable versions of March Madness ever.

It closed with 11th-seeded VCU in the Final Four and with eighth-seeded Butler joining the 1985 Villanova team as the highest seed to play in a championship game.

Villanova won that game by taking the air out of the ball and upsetting Georgetown.

Butler tried to do it in a most un-Butler way - by running a little and jacking up 3s.

Didn't work, and when the Bulldogs tried later to make baskets in the paint, it really looked like there was a lid there. During their dry spell, Howard, Garrett Butcher and Andrew Smith all missed open shots from under the bucket. It just wasn't their day.

Wasn't perfect for Connecticut, either.

The Huskies only made 19 of 55 shots, and Walker's 16 points came on 5-for-19 shooting. But through the ups and downs of the junior's college career, he has shown there are lots of way to lead - with words in the locker room, by example in the weight room and by doing the little things like playing defense and grabbing rebounds. He had nine on this night and finished with 15 in two games, including the 56-55 win over Kentucky in the semifinals.

His biggest offensive highlight: Probably the twisting, scooping layup he made with 10:15 left that put UConn ahead 39-28 - a double-digit lead that was essentially insurmountable in this kind of contest.

"It was tough shooting in the first half, but in the second half, we stuck with each other," Walker said. "We told each other we were going to make shots, and that's what we did."

It was the final, successful chapter in a season defined by believing even when things weren't going so great. This team lost its last two regular-season games and looked like it would spend a short time in the March Madness bracket. Instead, the Huskies were the team cutting down the last set of nets.

"We've been down that road before throughout the whole tournament," Oriakhi said. "We just keep playing basketball and we stick together, and I think that's what's most important."

(AP Photo/Eric Gay)

Categories: Sports
Tags: sports

AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 04, 2011

Univ. of Ill. Names New Springfield Chancellor

A Northern Michigan University administrator will take over the top position at the University of Illinois-Springfield this summer.

Susan Koch will become chancellor at the Springfield campus in July, the university said Monday. She's currently provost and vice president of academic affairs at Northern Michigan.

"With its strong reputation as a public liberal arts university, UIS is providing the state of Illinois with graduates who have the knowledge, skills and values necessary to be productive contributors to and leaders of their communities," Koch said in a news release. "I'm excited about working to continue and enhance this very important tradition."

University of Illinois President Michael Hogan said Koch has a lengthy track record of supporting liberal arts teaching.

"Dr. Koch's record reflects a proven appreciation for the value of a strong liberal arts education and a deep commitment to civic engagement," he said. "I couldn't be more pleased to have her joining our leadership team as we continue to advance the excellence of our Springfield campus and the entire University."

A South Dakota native, Koch taught health education before moving into administration at the University of Northern Iowa in 1995. She was the dean of Northern Iowa's graduate college before moving to Northern Michigan in 2007. Northern Michigan has about 9,300 students.

Koch replaces Richard Ringeisen, who retired last fall.

Hogan oversees the three-campus university system, while a chancellor is the top official at each campus. The Springfield campus is the smallest, with about 5,100 students.

The university is still looking for a new chancellor at the Urbana-Champaign campus, where interim Chancellor Robert Easter has been in charge since Richard Herman resigned in October 2009 over the university's admissions scandal. Herman's name appeared often in thousands of university e-mails detailing preferential treatment the school gave some well-connected student applicants.

Koch earned a bachelor's degree in health/physical education/biology at Dakota State University, and her first job was as a high school teacher in Waterloo, Ia. She earned a master's degree and doctorate, both in health education, at Northern Iowa and joined the faculty there in 1985.

(Photo courtesy of WIUM Public Radio)

Categories: Education

AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 04, 2011

Unions Mark MLK’s Death With National Protests

(With additional reporting from Illinois Public Media)

The eldest son of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. said Monday if his father had not been killed more than four decades ago, the civil rights icon would be fighting alongside workers rallying to protect collective bargaining rights.

Martin Luther King III joined about 1,000 marchers in Atlanta and thousands more across the country to support workers' rights on the anniversary of his father's assassination. King was in Memphis, Tenn., supporting a black municipal sanitation workers strike April 4, 1968, when he was shot to death on a hotel balcony.

King III laid a wreath at his parents' crypt before leading a group of clergy, labor and civil rights activists through downtown to the steps of the Georgia Capitol. Marchers held signs that read, "Stop the war on workers" and "Unions make us strong," and sang "This Little Light of Mine."

King III told the crowd at the statehouse that his father lost his life in the struggle for workers' dignity and democracy for all Americans, comparing the struggle to today's battle over collective bargaining rights in states including Wisconsin, Indiana and Ohio.

"If he were with us today, he would be at the forefront of this struggle to retain the rights of workers," King III said to the cheering crowd. "I would've hoped we would be in a different place in this nation 43 years after his death. Something has gone awry in America."

The rallies were part of a coordinated strategy by labor leaders to ride the momentum of pro-union demonstrations and national polls showing most Americans support collective bargaining rights. Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker and other GOP leaders have fought to reduce or strip those benefits.

Walker has argued that collective bargaining is a budget issue. He signed into law a bill the strips nearly all collective bargaining benefits from most public workers, arguing the move will give local governments flexibility in making budget cuts needed to close the state's $3.6 billion deficit.

Labor unions want to frame the debate as a civil rights issue, which could draw sympathy to public workers being blamed for busting state budgets with generous pensions. Arlene Holt Baker, executive vice president of the AFL-CIO, was in Atlanta for the "We Are One" campaign, which she said included teach-ins and vigils in dozens of cities nationwide. Holt Baker said the two movements are linked and that economic justice was King's dream.

"We need to thank these governors," she said. "They did for us what we haven't been able to do for ourselves for a long time. They have woken us up. They say it's about balancing budgets, but we know it's about union busting."

At a rally in Cleveland, about 300 union supporters denounced Ohio Gov. John Kasich and workers vowed to block the bill he signed last week that bans public worker strikes, eliminates binding arbitration and restricts bargaining for 350,000 public employees. U.S. Rep. Betty Sutton, D-Ohio, said Republicans are trying to silence workers at the bargaining table and told the crowd that Republican lawmakers are counting on us quitting.

"We pay respect to the dignity of your work," she said. "We thank you. We can't quit."

In downtown Louisville, Ky., about 200 people gathered at a rally. Musicians, including the Grammy-nominated Nappy Roots, played to their home crowd in a show of support, and a red, white and blue banner read "The Right to Bargain - Kentucky's Public Employees Deserve It - Now."

"The 9-to-5 of blue collar workers, we really are from that era," said Nappy Roots' Skinny DeVille, whose mom still works at the Louisville GE plant.

In Tennessee, groups against bills that would curtail or cut workers' rights stood silently as legislators walked into the House and Senate chambers.

On the University of Illinois campus, several different union groups showed up for a rally Monday in front of the Alma Mater statue. Peter Campbell with the U of I's Graduate Employees Organization praised King for teaching people about the importance of social and economic justice.

"King said if you support unions, you also support racial justice," Campbell said. "If you support racial justice, you support rights of workers. If you support women's rights, you support rights for everybody. So, we're all necessarily in this together."

Other union events are planned in the Champaign-Urbana area this week with a larger union rally planned in Chicago on April 9th.

(AP Photo/David Goldman)


AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 04, 2011

Blagojevich Seeks Obama Interview Notes From FBI

Rod Blagojevich asked a judge Monday to order prosecutors to hand over written summaries of any FBI interviews with President Barack Obama about the ousted Illinois governor's corruption case.

That raises the prospect that Blagojevich could try to make the president a prominent feature of his defense at his upcoming retrial.

Judges are traditionally averse to drawing sitting presidents into trials, however. And Judge James Zagel, who will preside over Blagojevich's retrial starting later this month, has repeatedly said Obama has no direct bearing on the allegations, which include that Blagojevich sought to sell or trade an appointment to Obama's vacated U.S. Senate seat.

Obama has not been accused of any wrongdoing in the case by anyone, including the defense. But Blagojevich's attorneys have argued before that Obama could help demonstrate that their client never did anything criminal but merely engaged in legal, political wheeling and dealing.

"I haven't seen any argument Obama has anything to bring to the table in this trial," said David Morrison, a deputy director of the Illinois Campaign for Political Reform who has followed the case closely. "I think Blagojevich has been desperate to drag Obama into this for years now, and this motion is just the latest gambit."

Blagojevich, 54, faces 20 charges, including allegations that he tried to exchange an appointment to Obama's seat for a top job or campaign cash. Jurors at his first trial deadlocked on all but one count, convicting him on a lone count of lying to the FBI.

Monday's request came in a motion filed with the U.S. District Court in Chicago, saying written accounts of any Obama interviews could "go directly to the heart of testimony of several government witnesses," particularly union leader and Obama ally Tom Balanoff.

U.S. Attorney's office spokesman Randall Samborn declined any comment on the motion.

Zagel had rejected a similar motion before Blagojevich's first trial. Unlike the motion last year, Monday's filing does not ask for permission to call Obama as a witness - an idea Zagel also shot down.

The new motion zeros in on Balanoff, a key government witness. He testified at the first trial that Obama called him on the eve of the 2008 election, telling Balanoff he preferred that family friend Valerie Jarrett work in the White House but that she wanted to be senator.

"I thanked him and I said I was going to reach out to Gov. Blagojevich and speak on Valerie's behalf," Balanoff testified.

Defense attorneys claim Balanoff's testimony about the call appeared to contradict some other accounts and that notes of any FBI interviews with Obama could clarify the issue.

Balanoff's testimony is potentially damaging to Blagojevich. On the witness stand last year, Balanoff also told jurors he was startled when, in discussing Jarrett's interest in the seat with Blagojevich, the then-governor broached the possibility of becoming secretary of health and human services in the Obama administration.

He took Blagojevich's reference as an offer to trade one for the other.

"I understood him to be offering that, `Hey, if I got this appointment (as a Cabinet secretary), then I could see my way to appoint Valerie Jarrett,'" Balanoff said.

Under cross-examination by defense attorney Sheldon Sorosky, Balanoff conceded that Blagojevich never said explicitly he wanted to trade the appointment to the seat for a top job.

Zagel has repeatedly denied defense moves that could put a spotlight on Obama. In a sidebar last year, for example, Sorosky told Zagel he wanted to ask Balanoff if the FBI focused its questions on Obama rather than Blagojevich when agents interviewed Balanoff.

"I think we have a right to bring that out," Sorosky told the judge.

"No, you don't," Zagel shot back.

That sidebar conversation last year was out of earshot of the jury, spectators and journalists in court, but official trial transcripts released later included it.

Monday's motion leaves open the option of the defense again asking for permission to subpoena Obama. Some legal observers say judges are reluctant to put presidents on the stand, in part, because the spectacle could throw proceedings into disarray.

"It would be a circus," said Gal Pissetzky, a Chicago-based attorney who frequently represents clients in federal court. "The whole focus of the trial would switch."

(AP Photo/James A. Finley, File)


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