Illinois Public Media News

AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 15, 2010

Home Foreclosure Figures Bring Mixed News for Illinois’ Economy

Illinois home foreclosure activity during the first quarter of 2010 fell 4.6 percent from the previous quarter, but was still higher than the first quarter of 2009.

A report released Thursday by Irvine, Calif.-based RealtyTrac shows Illinois with 45,780 foreclosure filings in the first quarter of 2010. Filings include default notices, auction-sale notices and bank repossessions.

The filings represent one in every 115 housing units in the state. That rate is nearly 17.5 percent higher than in the first quarter of last year and 9th-highest nationally.

Nevada again had the nation's highest foreclosure rate _ one in every 33 housing units.

Other states with foreclosure rates higher than Illinois were: Arizona, Florida, California, Utah, Michigan, Georgia, Idaho and Colorado.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 15, 2010

Champaign, Other Communities Hold Their Own Tea Party Rallies

A noontime rally of Tea Party supporters in Champaign attracted speakers decrying big government - it also attracted a couple dozen counter-protesters.

It's the second year tea party leaders protested at West Side Park on the day tax forms are due. This year, though, a handful of opponents infiltrated the several hundred supporters - it brought out some spirited arguments over health care and other hot-button topics among young people on both sides of the issues, sometimes in loud voices.

Nearby, Mike Balogh (BAY-low) was preparing to speak. He believes the tea party movement - though young and loosely organized - is already impacting national politics.

"A lot of the Congressmen who made the back-room deals -- the Chicago-style politics -- are already seeing the writing on the wall," Balogh said before his speech. "They're saying, 'Oh, I need to spend time with my family, I don't think I'm going to run.' "So yes, I think some of the legislators are genuinely concerned."

Katrina Messmore brought a group of home-schooled children to the rally along with a long paper banner -- one of the boys carrying the banner was dressed in Revolutionary War-period rags with chains on his arms and legs. "We make it a point to teach our kids about what's going on in government, and they kind of get riled up too," Messmore said. "They realize that what they're doing today will affect them in 15, 20 years."

On the other hand, University of Illinois graduate student Laura Godek and several other counter-protesters held up signs along nearby University Avenue, attracting the occasional honk from passing vehicles. When asked if the political landscape is getting too polarized for accomplishment, Godek said there was room for discussion. "I think they're very radically right, but the best you can do is talk and come to some kind of agreement or at least have people thinking. It's worth the effort."

There's a difference of opinion nationwide over whether the Tea Party should remain outside the political structure or become a full-fledged party - some Republican elected officials and candidates mingled with red-white-and-blue-clad participants at Thursday's rally.

Categories: Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 15, 2010

Champaign Park Board Delays Decision on Virginia Theatre Marquee

Faced with opposition to its plans to take down the neon marquee at the Virginia Theatre, the Champaign Park Board has decided the issue needs more study.

The V-shaped neon marquee has announced shows at the Virginia for 60 years or more. But Champaign park officials say restoration plans have always called for installing a less flashy marquee resembling what was on the Virginia when it opened in 1921. Susanne Skaggs, speaking during the public comment portion of Wednesday night's Champaign Park Board meeting, says the neon marquee distracts from the Virginia's Italian Renaissance façade.

"The marquee, as far as I'm concerned, is nothing but signage" says Skaggs. "And signage, certainly, can be easily changed."

But eight other people told park commissioners the neon marquee is an important part of the Virginia's history. Adam Smith is vice-chairman of the Champaign Historic Preservation Commission, which has formally requested that the neon marquee be preserved. Smith says the marquee has become a local landmark in itself.

"If the neon is lit, you know something is happening that night", says Smith, "you pull over on Park Street, you park and you find out what it is."

Champaign Park Commissioners voted Wednesday night to delay a decision on the Virginia marquee until they can get more information --- including how much it would cost to restore the current neon marquee, which is badly run down.

But the Park Board did approve nearly $600,000 in restoration work to be done this summer on the Virginia lobby, funded by private donations. Park Commissioners hope to do work on the marquee at the same time.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 14, 2010

Debate Over Champaign County Board Makeup to Continue

The Champaign County Board discussed proposals Tuesday night to reduce the number of county board seats and possible switch to single-member districts. But board members remained divided on an issue that could be a point of contention for months to come.

How a county board member feels about changing the board's size and district make up seems to depend on how they feel about county board attendance. Republican John Jay says the county board doesn't do a perfect job, but it's certainly not terrible.

"I think that we are representative of the county with the current status of the county board", says Jay. "Everybody seems to be bent on cutting it down, and I'm not sure why."

But Urbana Democrat Brendan McGinty supports a smaller county board. He says having 27 seats on the board leads to uneven performance --- and he says the voters notice it.

"I get comments like 'watching a meeting is like watching grass grow'. Or, 'how do you stand it?'", says McGinty.

A public hearing on the county board makeup drew comments from six people who were divided on the issue. County board members were divided, too. Both the hearing testimony and county board discussion included concerns from rural residents that changes to the board's makeup might reduce rural representation.

But Republican County Board member Greg Knott --- a longtime advocate for a smaller county board --- says reducing the board's size and switching to single-member districts doesn't have to hurt rural residents.

"You know, you can make a case on both circumstances which might be better", says Knott. I did some back-of-the envelope calculations and I can, through whichever way, single or multi, even with a variation in the size of numbers .. you can insure if a map is drawn, that there's equal representation between the rural and the urban areas."

However, Knott said on Wednesday that he's still undecided on the single-member district proposal, and is leaning towards keeping multi-member districts. Backers of the current three-member districts say they promote diversity on the county board and help ensure that county residents can always find a board member in their district who will listen to their concern.

A proposal from Urbana Democrat Steve Beckett addresses support for multi-member districts. Beckett's plan would reduce the county board to 18 members, grouped into nine districts with two members each. Policy Committee Chair Tom Betz is sticking with his proposal for 17 single-member districts. Meanwhile, he says he'll keep the subject on the Policy Committee agenda for the next few meetings.

NOTE: This story has been revised from its broadcast version, which incorrectly stated that County Board Member Knott supports single-member districts.

Categories: Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 14, 2010

The Census Takes a New Turn, with Workers Going Door-to-Door

A planner in Champaign County says response to the 2010 census is slightly better than at this point during the last census two years ago.

But Andrew Levy says census workers will still have to go door-to-door to find and count the 30 percent of people in the county who won't have turned in their forms by the end of this week. Levy says enumerators are already at work in some parts of the county that are usually tougher to count.

"They're focusing in rural areas and they have been out there for quite awhile," Levy said. "In Champaign-Urbana, census workers are concentrated around the U of I campus to make sure that they count the students before they leave for the summer. But they'll be all over Champaign-Urbana in the next few weeks."

Levy says if an enumerator comes to your door, they'll only ask the 10 short questions found on the census form - there's no long census form this year. Census workers are also required to show official identification and will not ask for anyone's social security or credit card number.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 14, 2010

Police Review Board Referendum Question Neglected at City of Champaign Town Meeting

A proposal to put a referendum on the ballot in Champaign in support of a citizens police review board fizzled at last (Tuesday) night's annual town meeting.

The proposal's backer, Democratic precinct committeeman Wayne Williams, says he had to leave the City of Champaign town meeting early, due to a family emergency. And afterwards, no one brought his proposals --- including another referendum on healthcare reform --- up for a vote.

The Champaign City Council narrowly rejected a citizens police review board three years ago. But Williams says he continues to believe that a citizens police review board is needed.

"The most important thing about this is that the status quo is not acceptable", says Williams, who also serves on the Champaign County Board of Review. "I don't think it's right that police are allowed to investigate police complaints."

Republican precinct committeeman Bill Glithero also attended the annual town meeting in Champaign --- he estimates the attendance at around 15 or 20 people. Glithero says he thinks some people at the meeting may have supported the referendum proposal, but didn't understand that they were eligible to make a motion for it.

The annual town meetings held in townships across Illinois last (Tuesday) night are the only government meetings in the state where regular voters can take direct action on agenda items. Williams says he's exploring the possibility of a special town meeting to bring up the police review board referendum again.

Categories: Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 14, 2010

Urbana School Board Examines Plans for King School Improvements

The Urbana School Board wants to focus its priorities before moving forward with proposed improvements for King Elementary School.

At a special school board meeting Tuesday night, Board President John Dimit said he had sticker shock when he learned of the projected seven-point-five million dollar price tag for all of the requested improvements. He asked architects and a steering committee studying the issue to set some priorities.

"I'm just asking you to go back and take a look at it and really determine what's important", explained Dimit. "And now I want somebody to think about, 'Oh my God, this is eight million dollars.'"

The proposed improvements are based on district goals for all schools and specific criteria for King Elementary. Some of proposed improvements include air conditioning, a new multi-purpose room, and separate parent and bus drop-off sites.

The Steering Committee will bring back a revised plan at an upcoming meeting. Dimit says they need to move quickly in order to begin work on the King school improvements by this fall.

Categories: Education
Tags: education

AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 13, 2010

Charges Dropped Against Teen Arrested Following Kiwane Carrington Incident

Charges have been dropped against a Champaign teen whose friend was fatally shot in a scuffle with city police last fall.

16-year old Jeshaun Manning-Carter was charged with resisting a peace officer in connection to that confrontation on October 9th. Kiwane Carrington died after being shot in that incident... after a report of a break-in at a home on West Vine Street. Champaign County State's Attorney Julia Reitz says Manning-Carter has upheld his end of the bargain by staying in school, staying out of trouble, and completing a 6-week county-funded counseling program called Parenting with Love and Limits with his mother. Rietz says dropping charges against the youth was not based on an inability to prove them. She says the goal of this case, as with any other in the juvenile justice system, is to set a youth on the right track.

"If he had not finished the program, if he was not going to school, if he was getting in trouble, I would have gone forward with the trial if that was what we needed to do," says Rietz. "This is not a question of whether or not we had the evidence to support the charges. It's simply the standard operating procedure in juvenile court when we're trying to get kids the help that they need." Rietz says counselors maintain contact with the teen's family, and he'll continue to attend the READY school in Champaign.

Rietz concluded in December that Champaign officer Daniel Norbits fired accidentally, and would not face criminal charges from the incident. He remains on paid administrative leave. The results of a city of Champaign investigation into police policy are expected next week. Two experts outside the city... Retired Urbana Police Chief Eddie Adair and retired McLean County Judge John Freese are conducting that study, but any changes to policy will be up to City Manager Steve Carter.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 13, 2010

Champaign Neighborhood Liaison Mable Thomas Dies

The head of the city of Champaign's Neighborhood Services department says a familiar face to neighborhood groups in the city will be missed.

Mable Thomas has been the neighborhood coordinator since the city formed its neighborhood services program in 1992. Thomas died early Tuesday morning in St. Louis after an illness of several months.

Kevin Jackson says Thomas was the main liaison between Champaign's many neighborhood groups and city government, and she was the right person for the job.

"She not only had to have the ability to remain calm and posed in potentially volatile situations, but dealing with a variety of stakeholder interests she had to be a strong-willed person and a very objective person to make sure that the right thing happened," Jackson said.

Champaign mayor Jerry Schweighart says Thomas's loss is a loss to city government and the community. Thomas created a small grant program for neighborhood projects and oversaw Champaign's role in the anti-crime program known as National Night Out.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 13, 2010

Urbana City Council Gives Initial OK to Olympian Drive Design Engineering

The Urbana City Council gave its unanimous endorsement Monday night to intergovernmental agreements that would launch the design engineering phase of the Olympian Road extension. If finalized next week, Urbana would be one step closer to using 5 million dollars in state funds to pay for the design work.

The vote came after Urbana council members heard from dozens of local residents. Some, including business and government leaders, say the extension would help spur commercial development on Urbana's north side, providing tax revenue and jobs. But a majority of speakers said they feared the road would encourage urban sprawl at the expense of farmland. Mayor Laurel Prussing says the city will consider their concerns during a public engagement process that will accompany the design engineering process.

"We will listen to what everybody has to say and we will redesign the plan as necessary", says Prussing. "But we are concerned that in order to have parks, in order to have schools, in order to have a decent way of life, you do have to have a healthy tax base."

But William Cope, one of the organizers of Olympian Drive opponents says lack of support on the Champaign County Board could stop the project from getting beyond the planning phase.

"You know, the project won't happen, without the county board's involvement and support", says Cope. "And therefore, they're against it at the moment. It's unlikely it will happen, so it could well be $5 million just wasted."

The $ 5 million is state funding that's been guaranteed for this phase of work on Olympian Drive. Part of it would pay for acquisition of land for the road --- which would need Champaign County Board approval. But county board support for Olympian Drive has been so weak that a vote on the issue has been delayed until next year.

Urbana Council members amended their Olympian Drive resolution to add in design work on North Lincoln Avenue. Those improvements would allow truck traffic between Olympian Drive and I-74. While North Lincoln is considered crucial to Olympian Drive's success, it's not actually part of the 27 million dollar project.


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