Illinois Public Media News

AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 09, 2010

University of Illinois Extension Will Close 12 Centers, Cut 46 Administrative Jobs

Faced with a $5.5 million budget cut proposed by Governor Quinn, the University of Illinois Extension says it will close 12 of its regional Extension Centers around the state, and eliminate 46 administrative positions.

The regional centers house Extension Educators, who will now do their work elsewhere. Extension spokesman Gary Beaumont says the goal is to trim expenses, with a minimal impact on the services they provide.

"What we're trying to do is reduce rental costs, and keep more people around", says Beaumont, "especially the people who deliver education programs. So that's why the Centers have been targeted. And our goal is to move our educators to county offices."

Extension Centers in Carbondale, Effingham, Macomb, Mount Vernon and the Chicago suburb of Matteson will close on or about June 30th. Centers in Champaign, Springfield, East Peoria, the Quad Cities, Rockford, Edwardsville and the Chicago suburb of Countryside will close as soon as possible, depending on their leases

Beaumont says the 46 administrative positions being cut will result in fewer than 46 people leaving, because many of those positions have been vacant. In addition, Beaumont says some of the administrators have applied to leave on their own, under the U of I's Voluntary Separation program.

But the closures and job cuts are only the first phase of reductions planned by the U of I Extension. Beaumont says plans are being made to consolidate county offices down to just 30. And he says there will eventually be cuts made in the number of Extension educators and civil service secretarial positions.

Categories: Education, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 09, 2010

Moonwalk Participants Organize for Giant Leap for Fitness

The third annual Champaign County Moonwalk begins next Friday, April 16th. The event is meant to inspire county residents to walk a combined total of 238,700 miles -- the distance from Earth to the moon - in 8 weeks.

Jamie Kleiss , of the U of I Extension, organizes the Moonwalk and brought the event to Champaign County, after it was launched in Peoria. (Another Moonwalk is held annually in the Quad Cities). Kleiss, who says she had just enjoyed a walk during her lunch hour, says there are many benefits from simple regular walking:

"Better sleep, better mood, your digestion is better, the benefits are endless", says Kleiss. "It helps regulate blood sugar. So even for anybody who doesn't have any chronic diseases, it still can be great. And it's a lot of fun --- and it's nice to get outside."

Kleiss says regular walking can also lead to weight loss, but that depends on the person's fitness and current activity levels. Anyone interested in weight loss through walking should speak to their physician first.

So far, Kleiss says, 93 teams and 50 individuals have signed up for the Champaign County Moonwalk, for a total of 839 participants. She's hoping to double that number by next Friday, which would be in line with last year's participation.

There will be a Moonwalk launch party on April 15th at the Parkland College Planetarium.

Categories: Education, Health

AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 08, 2010

Ikenberry Downsizes Projected U of I Tuition Hike

Interim President Stanley Ikenberry says he's lowered his own projections for how much tuition new students will go up at the University of Illinois next year. . Ikenberry says he's backed away from worst-case projections of 20% tuition increases, and is now projecting increases of 9 or 9.5%. He says that's because of success in reducing university spending, and because Governor Pat Quinn's proposed budget wouldn't chop the U of I's appropriation as severely as he feared. However, Ikenberry still expects the university to lose somewhere around $45 million in state funding, which he says would be a 6% reduction.

"The range of possibilities is pretty large out there", says Ikenberry. "But right now, at least in the short term, we think we can see the outlines of next year's budget. It's going to continue to be difficult, but we think manageable within the framework of a 9.5% increase."

U of I trustees are scheduled to vote on a tuition recommendation until their May 20th meeting in Chicago. But Ikenberry says he wanted to get his projections out now, to help students and parents.

"This is a tough time for students and parents", says Ikenberry. "So we're trying to make the decision as early as we can, so they have a basis to plan, but also to hold that number as low as we responsibly can make it."

Ikenberry says a 9.5% tuition increase can still be affordable when considering that it stays the same for students during their undergraduate enrollment. Over that period, he says the increase amounts to about 3.5% percent a year.

The increased tuition would come to about $10,337 a year at the Urbana campus, plus room and board. At the Chicago campus tuition would be about $9,092, and $8,068 in Springfield.

-- additional reporting from the Associated Press

Categories: Education, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 08, 2010

Champaign County Board to Vote On Rural Bus Service Proposal

A rural mass transit system serving Vermilion County hopes to be providing its service to some rural Champaign county cities by the fall.

The Champaign County Board's committee of the whole approved the plan from CRIS Rural Transit this week. The buses in Vermilion County have run based on appointment for 25 years, and are open to anyone on weekdays. CRIS Rural Transit is a branch of the CRIS Healthy Aging Center. CEO Amy Marchand says she came before the Champaign County Board based on responses to surveys and her appearances at village meetings. She says many have come to rely on their buses each day.

"Some people use it to go to dialysis treatment two or three times a week," says Marchand. "Some people use it to take classes at a college. Some people use it to just have regular doctor's appointments. There's a group from a senior high rise that go to Wal-Mart once a week to buy their groceries." The CRIS buses are partially funded through federal funds. Marchand also says a small percentage of local sales tax goes to downstate funding for mass transit, but it's currently distributed elsewhere since Champaign County doesn't provide the service.

County Board member Steve Moser opposes the plan, contending that more taxes, including property tax, would be needed to pay for the service. He also says CRIS buses would duplicate what's provided by the Champaign County Regional Planning Commission. But the agency's Darlene Kloeppel says it may let CRIS replace its Rural Rider program, which serves solely senior citizens, if it can help most of its clients. Kloeppel says there are other bus providers in rural Champaign County, but no one will be forced to end their service. "If people don't want to continue to provide service, or if they're able to do it more efficiently in another way, they certainly can do that as well. That's why this is a good thing, because it gives people options."

If the County Board approves the plan April 22nd, CRIS would apply for the service in July, and Illinois' Department of Transportation would have to approve the plan. The initial towns served would be Rantoul, Thomasboro, and Ludlow.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 07, 2010

$15 Million Federal Grant Will Help UI, Other Universities Secure Electronic Medical Data

Faculty at the University of Illinois will head up a team working to place more medical records on line, and keep them out of the wrong hands.

A $15 million grant from the US Department of Health and Human Services was awarded to 20 researchers from 12 universities, led by the U of I's Information Trust Institute. Computer Science Professor Carl Gunter is the lead investigator for a project called Strategic Healthcare Information Technology Advanced Research Projects on Security, or 'SHARPS.' Gunter says moving from a paper record system to one that's electronically based offers a series of challenges. He says threats to privacy can exist inside a hospital or in the process of transferring records between medical facilities, which requires patient consent.

Gunter says a third challenge exists for patients wanting to relay medical information electronically from their home... accessing those records as they would a bank account. "Allowing someone who may have health problems to get a blood pressure reading at home once a day," says Gunter. ''...and then their physician can track their position more closely, like outpatient care, where it uses individual monitoring devices to allow people to use networks to transfer their data back." Gunter says the federal grant will support collaborative efforts. His work will integrate cyber security research at sites like the U of I and New York University with medical facilities like Northwestern Memorial Hospital.

The grant will last four years. Three others totaling $45 million were awarded to other institutions in related areas.

Categories: Education, Health, Technology

AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 07, 2010

Candidates for Vacant Seat Appear Before Champaign City Council

A retired firefighter, a politically active businessman and a healthcare consultant all appeared before the Champaign City Council Tuesday night to state why they should be appointed to fill the seat left vacant when Dave Johnson resigned.

The three all hope to fill the vacant District Five council seat covering southwest Champaign. Retired Deputy Fire Chief Tim Wild says he knows Champaign well after working for the city for more than 30 years.

"I think my experience in working for the city gives me some insights into the different departments and how they work", says Wild, "and some of the people, some of the strengths and weaknesses. So I might have some insights that others don't have."

Gordie Hulten has worked on several political campaigns, and says he admires the City Council's ability to tackle tough issues without giving into partisan rancor.

"That you can address difficult and controversial issues like Big Broadband, Unofficial St. Patrick's Day, police-community relations, Olympian Drive --- all of these contentious things reflects how your collegiality can lead to more reflective governance", said Hulten.

Hulten helps operate and writes for the local political blog, "Illini Pundit". But he says he would give the blog up, if selected for the council seat.

Cathy Emmanuel says her experience as a health care consultant demonstrates her ability to foster collaboration.

"I have been in health care administration, working and trying to represent and collaborate between hospitals and physicians", said Emmanuel, "which isn't always an easy task. And I've been able to do that, and maintain a good relationship on both sides of the aisle over the last 15 to 20 years."

Afterwards, Mayor Jerry Schweighart said it was a strong field.

"I think you couldn't go wrong with any one of the three", said Schweighart. "All three of them I know, or met with. And they appear to be top-quality people, who would fit very well with this

Council members had given the applicants written questions earlier.

And in the replies --- released by the city Tuesday night, the three candidates all say they think City Manager Steve Carter is on the right track with efforts to improve police-community relations in the wake of the Kiwane Carrington shooting.

They generally support the extension of Olympian Drive --- although Emanuel wants more financial questions answered before making a final decision.

And, if given a million dollars of city money to spend, Hulten would use it to repair and replace aging city infrastructure. Wild --- a retired firefighter --- would use it to hire more police and firefighter personnel. And Emanuel says she would spend the million on needs identified in Champaign's Fiscal Sustainability Plan, in order to avoid layoffs and continue city services.

Champaign City Council members will vote in two weeks on their choice to fill the District Five eat until a mid-term election next year.

Categories: Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 06, 2010

Feedback from Community Forum on Champaign Police-Community Relations Now Online

Feedback gathered in a community forum on police-community relations in Champaign is now online at the city's website.

More than 300 people attended the March 15th forum, which city officials organized in the wake of criticism following the shooting death of Africa-American teenager Kiwane Carrington during a scuffle with police.

Comments from each of the forum's discussion table are now in a 43-page report. They include responses to the forum's main questions about police-community relations and how they can be improved.

City Community Relations Specialist Garth Minor says the Community Forum Working Group --- made up of city officials and community members --- will meet Thursday morning to start going over the report, looking for common themes.

"Once we find those themes, then the next step will be to prioritize and develop those themes into action items", says Minor. "This information then will be shared with forum participants for their review and comment. All of that information then will be compiled into a final report that will be presented to the city manager for implementation."

Some of the recurring ideas from the Community Forum included the need for mutual respect between police and young people, and increased contact between police and young people in non-crisis situations.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 06, 2010

Urbana City Council Votes to Accept Big Broadband Grant, Joining Champaign & U of I

Champaign-Urbana is ready to say "yes" to a federal grant for a fiber-optic broadband network. The Urbana City Council voted 5 to nothing Monday night to accept the grant --- joining Champaign and the University of Illinois in endorsing the "UC2B" Broadband project.

Champaign, Urbana and the U of I are accepting a $22.5 million federal recovery grant to pay the lion's share of the cost of building the fiber-optic rings linking schools, hospitals, city buildings and libraries --- plus fiber-optic connections to send low-cost service to 4600 homes in underserved areas. U of I Associate Vice Chancellor for Public Engagement Pradeep Khanna told council members of the value of the new high-speed telecom network in attracting business.

"From first-hand experience, I can say, the lack of redundant broadband access already has been cited by many firms, as the key reason for not being interested in locating in Champaign-Urbana", said Khanna, who also heads Corporate Relations for the university's Public Engagement office.

Once the broadband network is built, local officials will have to figure out how to manage and market it ... and how to find the money to complete home service connections for the rest of Champaign-Urbana.

Alderman Brandon Bowersox, who will now serve on the Broadband Project's Policy Committee, says the economic questions pose the biggest risks. He says UC2B must offer service that makes enough money to pay for its operations and maintenance.

Meanwhile, project organizer Michael Smeltzer says they've already applied to Google, which is planning to install high-speed broadband service in select cities. Although he concedes it's a long shot, Smeltzer says they hope Google will consider funding the installation of broadband connections in the rest of Champaign-Urbana.

Monday night's vote commits Urbana to $345,000 in matching funds for the UC2B project. Champaign, the U of I and the state are also providing funding.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 05, 2010

Rural Residents Doing Their Part in Champaign County Census Returns

Smaller towns in Champaign County are taking the lead in returning 2010 Census forms.

Overall, the county is just over 50 % percent in the rate of response. A planner with Champaign County's Regional Planning Commission says it's not surprising that rural communities like Ivesdale and Ogden each have a rate of return around 70% since they have smaller populations - and those populations don't change much. Andrew Levy says the lack of response from University of Illinois students are a big reason Champaign and Urbana's response rates are just under 50%. The US Census Bureau is requesting that the forms be returned by mid-April. For those that haven't, census workers will be going door to door to ask the same questions on the form. Levy is asking U of I students to accommodate those enumerators the best they can. "As local governments, we're asking that everybody help and particpate, especially around apartment buildings, to make sure census workers have access to the buildings," says Levy. "They'll have badgets, and it's really important that everybody identify that it is a census worker."

Levy says he hopes his office and others handling the census can end the misconception that the census forms can be filled out on line. He says neighboring counties like Vermilion and Piatt have higher response rates than Champaign County... since they're made up of more small rural towns. An accurate count in the 2010 census ensures that counties receive the right amount of tax dollars and proper representation in Congress.

Categories: Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 05, 2010

Five Current University Presidents Among Finalists For UI President

University of Illinois Trustees could begin interviewing its 10 finalists for university president by the end of this week. The presidential search committee is not naming the finalists, but committee chair and trustee Pam Strobel says 8 of the 10 come from the public universities, and some have ties to the U of I. Five of them are current university presidents.

On Monday, she says the committee updated the rest of the Trustees on those finalists. Strobel says the board is on track to name a new president by sometime next month. And she says the finalists aren't concerned about the economic climate affecting the U of I, along with many other campuses. "And it seems to be almost an epidemic that is going on, affecting especially public universities in so very many states," says Strobel. "And so we are not alone even though we are in a very serious financial crisis... and the caliber of people who we are looking at seem to be very able to rise to the challenge." Strobel says the trustees aren't releasing when or where candidate interviews will be conducted. U of I board members met in closed session Monday in Chicago... and may interview some of those finalists when meeting again Friday. Stanley Ikenberry, the U of I's president from 1979 to 1995, has served as interim president since Joseph White stepped down last year amid an admissions scandal.

Categories: Economics, Education

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