Illinois Public Media News

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - April 28, 2011

Cherry Orchard Landlords to Appear in Court for Violating Judge’s Ruling

The Champaign County State's Attorney's Office has filed an Indirect Criminal Contempt petition against the landlords of the Cherry Orchard Village apartments.

During a bench trial earlier this month, Bernard and Eduardo Ramos were convicted of violating a local health ordinance by failing to legally connect the property's sewer and septic systems. They must pay more than $54,000 in fines, and are barred from housing tenants until the property is brought up to code.

But Champaign County State's Attorney Julia Rietz said Champaign County Sheriffs Deputies and Public Health District officials have confirmed people are still living there.

"The petition alleges that despite the judge's order Champaign County Sheriffs Deputies and Public Health District officials have confirmed that people are still residing in the complex," Rietz said in a statement.

The Ramoses must appear in court on Thursday, May 5, 2011 at 2:30 to answer the petition.

Cherry Orchard is located right outside of Rantoul, and has traditionally housed migrant workers.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - April 28, 2011

Walgreens Buys Carle Retail Pharmacies

The Carle Foundation is selling its pharmacy division to Walgreens.

The drug store's purchase of Carle RxExpress will mean four of its pharmacy locations will close in the next two months. By May 31st, Carle pharmacies on Urbana's Cunningham Avenue and Windsor Road will close, along with the location in Danville. In June, Carle's South Clinic location will consolidate with main lobby pharmacy at Carle Hospital. The remaining six will stay open under the Walgreens banner, and Carle's remaining inventory will transfer to nearby Walgreens locations.

Carle Foundation Executive Vice President John Snyder said the retail pharmacy industry has become more competitive, with new consolidations. He said Walgreens can offer discounts on generics and 90-day prescriptions that Carle can't sustain. But Snyder said consumers using Carle pharmacy locations won't see a change in service.

"They have quite a bit of experience in taking over hospital pharmacies, as well as medical office building pharmacies," he said. "They don't run them like typical Walgreens stores. They do recognize there's a difference. Their plan is to run them basically as they're run now with the same hours, and hopefully the same staff."

Snyder says Walgreens has committed to hiring about 80-percent of Carle's 76 pharmacy workers, and will interview all who apply. He said other employees with the necessary skills will be offered the chance to transfer to other jobs at Carle, while remaining workers will receive a severance package. But Walgreens spokeswoman Tiffany Washington said there wasn't a specific figure, only saying that a 'large majority' or Carle RxExpress employees would still have positions at the pharmacies.

Financial terms of the sale weren't disclosed. Proceeds from the sale will go towards the purchase of new hospital facilities and equipment.

Categories: Business, Economics, Health

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - April 27, 2011

Overlooked’ Still a Priority at Ebert’s 13th Annual Film Fest

The word 'overlooked' is no longer part of the title in Urbana native Roger Ebert's annual film festival.

But the director of the 13th annual event at the Virginia Theater in Champaign says it's still a large part of the mission. Nate Kohn says attendees may be surprised with some of the names attached to the screening, including the Friday night movie, a love story that will be accompanied by Director Norman Jewison.

"Very few people are familiar with the film 'Only You', and yet it stars Robert Downey Jr. and Marisa Tomei, pretty prominent names," said Kohn. "I think that's a good example. Most people cite 'In the Heat of the Night' as (Jewison's) best-known film."

Jewison has been nominated for five Academy Awards, winning an honorary Oscar in 1999. Other guests appearing with their work including actress Tilda Swinton, and directors Richard Linklater and Tim Blake Nelson.

Kohn says usually, Friday afternoon is reserved for annual viewing of a silent film accompanied by the Alloy Orchestra. But he says Fritz Lang's vision of the future from 1927, with missing footage, will be among the festival's biggest highlights Wednesday evening.

"Because 'Metropolis' was just recently restored to its full length, some missing footage was found in Argentina..." said Kohn. "We thought it was signifcant enough to move it to the opening night film."

'Metropolis' is among those listed in Ebert's 1998 'Great Movies' essay. Meanwhile, free panel discussions will be held at the University of Illinois' Illini Union beginning at 9 Thursday, Friday, and Saturday morning.

Kohn admits the traffic presents a challenge with the Illinois Marathon going on at the same time Saturday. But he says coordinators worked with Champaign police so transportation could flow as smoothly as possible.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 27, 2011

Elmer Lynn Hauldren, Empire Carpet Man, Dead at 89

A World War II veteran who became famous as the Empire Carpet Man has died at age 89.

Empire Today spokeswoman Marlo Michalek says Elmer Lynn Hauldren died Tuesday at his Evanston home. A cause of death wasn't given but Michalek said he had been sick.

Hauldren was the voice of Empire carpet on television advertising in the 1970s. The ads later aired around the country in cities like New York, Washington and San Francisco. He was the company spokesperson until he died.

The company says it chose Hauldren as its on-air talent after auditioning several others for the role. Hauldren helped launch the carpet company's "588-2300" jingle.

Hauldren was the father of 6, grandfather of 18 and great-grandfather of 10. He also was a singer in a barbershop quartet.

Categories: Business, Entertainment

AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 27, 2011

Indiana Poised to Cut Planned Parenthood Funding

Indiana is poised to become the first state to cut all government funding for Planned Parenthood.

The move would be a significant victory for anti-abortion activists but could pose a political predicament for Republican Gov. Mitch Daniels as he considers running for president.

The Indiana House voted 66-32 Wednesday to cut off the $3 million in federal money the state distributes to the organization for family planning and health programs. The Senate approved the measure earlier this month.

Indiana risks losing $4 million in federal family planning grants if Daniels signs the bill.

A veto could antagonize ardent conservatives wary of Daniels' calls for a truce on "social issues" to focus on the economy. But signing the bill also could provide the political cover he needs from critical social conservatives.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 27, 2011

Flooding Prompts Debate between Mo. Farmers and Il. Residents

The Army Corps of Engineers is waiting to decide if it will intentionally break a levee to help relieve flooding problems in a Southern Illinois town. But farmers in Missouri are objecting to the plan.

Flooding in Cairo, Illinois is so bad, more than 100 people have been evacuated. It's a town of 2,800 residents at the southern tip of Illinois between the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers.

"I'm 50 years old, and I can't recall seeing it higher before," said Sheila Simon, Illinois' lieutenant governor.

She said she hopes the water levels start to go down, or else the Army Corps might have to poke holes in a Mississippi River levee near Cairo.

But farmers in Missouri say that would flood their land and ruin crops. In a statement, Blake Hurst, the head of the Missouri Farm Bureau, said 130,000 acres of farmland could be destroyed.

Missouri has filed a lawsuit to block efforts to break the levee. A court hearing is scheduled for Thursday.

Categories: Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 27, 2011

Emanuel Warns Not-for-Profits About Changes

Mayor-elect Rahm Emanuel says no group is immune from the sweeping changes he plans to make in the city of Chicago.

Emanuel said Wednesday that means changes for non-profits and charitable organizations as well. For instance, he said he no longer wants non-profits and charitable organizations to get free city water in their facilities.

He says it's all part of his philosophy that every group needs to make some sacrifices so no one group has to sacrifice more than it should. Emanuel takes over as mayor May 16. He says nobody is in a "sacrifice-free zone."

Emanuel made his comments at an arts event in downtown Chicago. He was initially asked whether non-profits should pay property taxes. He promised to look into it and give a fuller answer later.

Categories: Business, Government

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - April 27, 2011

Vermilion County Food Company Plans Large Expansion

Henning-based Full-Fill Industries in Vermilion County plans to expand its operation thanks to $2.5 million dollars in state tax incentives, which will be administered to assist in areas such as job training, tax credits, and infrastructure improvements.

Full-Fill Industries, which is owned by the Clapp Family of Danville, produces cooking spray products.

"Family-owned businesses like Full-Fill are the backbone of our economy," Governor Pat Quinn said in a statement. "We must do what we can to give them the tools they need to grow and succeed."

The company plans to double its size by constructing three new high-speed production lines in 25,000-square-feet of new manufacturing space. In addition, it will build a 108,000 square-foot warehouse and distribution building, which will include eight new docks and additional bulk tank storage for edible oils.

Company CEO David Clapp anticipates construction will begin this summer, and wrap up within the next year and a half.

"We've been in business for a little over 10 years and this kind of news is very exciting for us," he said. "It's a once in a lifetime dream come true."

The company currently employs 94 employees, but will be able to hire an additional 150 people for various jobs including management, administrative and production positions.

Clapp adds because of the financial support from the state, the company will start producing cooking spray products for ConAgra Foods, which has relied on service from a plant in Rossville that is expected to close. That plant employs about 170 people, and Full-Fill Industries said there is a possibility it will be able to retain some of those jobs.

Categories: Business, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 27, 2011

Former Attorney Shows up to Wish Blagojevich Luck

The lead attorney at Rod Blagojevich's first trial walked into the courtroom where the ex-governor's retrial is under way to wish his former client luck.

Sam Adam Jr. showed up just before proceedings began Wednesday. He shook hands with Blagojevich and gave one of the ousted governor's new attorneys a hug.

During the first trial, Adam's courtroom style led to clashes with Judge James Zagel and raised the ire of prosecutors.

Current defense attorney Sheldon Sorosky turned to prosecutors sitting nearby on Wednesday and joked that Adam would be giving the opening statement for the defense.

Jury selection hasn't finished, and Zagel has said openings could take place Monday.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - April 27, 2011

Champaign County Board Members Discuss Compensation Issue

Champaign County Board members haven't had a raise in more than 20 years.

And based on a straw poll conducted Tuesday night, a majority of them don't want to change the method they're paid, earning a specific per diem per meeting plus mileage, rather than an annual salary. But the amount of that per diem has yet to be set. It's currently $45, an amount some call woefully short. Urbana Democrat Tom Betz said it's kept some people from serving.

"It costs them more in the evening to pay the babysitter than they're getting in the per diem," he said. "It has really happened. I know one very good board member we lost because of that. No entity goes 25 years without any salary increase. It's really kind of ludicrous."

Champaign Democrat Michael Richards agrees, saying his party has trouble recruiting candidates with the current level of compensation, but Mahomet Republican John Jay said a raise can't be justified after the sacrifices county employees have made.

"So I'm hoping that we don't raise it at this time..," he said. "..In due respect to our employees, and to the taxpayers of this county, until we get our county back into some kind of reasonable fiscal shape."

Urbana Republican Steve Moser said money was never an incentive for him to serve on the county board, saying it's no different from serving on a school board.

County Administrator Deb Busey suggests the board set compensation rates every 10 years, and prior to a change in county board structure. It's expected to have 22 members instead of the current 27 after the 2012 elections. Voters recommended the change in an advisory referendum last fall.

The rates for board members don't have to be set until about six months before a new county board is sworn in, but county board chair Pius Wiebel said he'd hope to do it much sooner.

In another straw poll, the County Board also rejected a suggestion that the title of county board chair become an elected member of the county rather than one chosen by county board members.

Categories: Economics, Government, Politics

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