Illinois Public Media News

AP - Illinois Public Media News - March 02, 2010

Microfinance Nobel Laureate Inspires Developer to Seek to Open Bank Branch in C-U

Muhammad Yunus and his Grameen Bank won the 2006 Nobel Peace Prize for the concept of "microfinance". Now a local businessman wants to bring the concept to Champaign-Urbana.

Developer Peter Fox says he's in talks with Yunus to open a branch of Grameen America bank in Champaign-Urbana. He and his wife are pledging $100, 000 toward the project.

"This will be a donation to capitalize the bank", says Fox. "Then after that, we'd raise additional money. Obviously, we would do it on behalf of Grameen and they would set the ground rules. So we're just trying to be the catalyst to get it started --- then they would operate the venture."

Yunus explained the principles of microfinance during a talk Monday nigh at the University of Illinois. It involves the loaning of small amounts of money to people too poor to qualify for traditional bank loans, so they can start or improve their own businesses.

"We run a banking program in New York City right now, in Jackson Hieghts, called Grameen America, exactly the same as we do in Bangladesh, and with the same result", says Yunus. "We have over 2,000 borrowers have there -- all women. Average loan about $1500. Repayment is near 0."

From its start in Bangladesh in the 1980s, Grameen and other organizations offering "microcredit" have spread around the world, including to the U-S. Fox says he's very impressed with Grameen America bank, which currently runs operations in New York, San Francisco and Omaha. He says he'll need to raise another $700,000 to $800,000 for Grameen America to come to Champaign-Urbana.

Yunus' talk at the Univesity of Illinois received a standing ovation from a near-capacity crowd at Foellinger Auditorium on the U of I campus. Afterwards, university Interim President Stanley Ikenberry presented Yunus with the university's Presidential Award and Medallion.

Categories: Economics, Education

AP - Illinois Public Media News - March 01, 2010

Katherine Reutter’s Father Says She Already Has Sights Set on Olympic Gold in 2014

The father of speed skater and Champaign native Katherine Reutter says the amount of effort put into Winter Olympic events should be viewed as a victory in itself.

Jay Reutter says getting past the intensity level in Vancouver served as a wakeup call for a daughter whose highest competition prior to last month was in the 2009 Speed Skating World Cup. Before Reutter earned silver and bronze medals, she competed in the women's 1,500 meter finals, finishing fourth. Jay Reutter says getting anywhere near the top in that event is a struggle, with a lot of bumping and pushing along the way. "I was happy with the way she fought," says Reutter. "I was happy with the way she handled herself in the races. She never gave up. She fought as hard as she could, and that's all I could have ever asked of her. But it was probably significantly more intense than she was prepared for. And some of that she had to try to play down just to try to keep control and be able to perform well."

Reutter later won the bronze medal in the ladies' speed skating 3,000 meter relay, and the silver medal Friday night in the ladies' 1,000 meter race. Jay Reutter coached her daughter through much of her youth, but says he can't take sole credit. He says former Olympic figure skater Erin Gleason did some additional coaching, while Champaign Centennial High School football coach Mike McDonell helped out on Katherine's approach to sports. She graduated from Centennial High in 2006. Jay Reutter says his daughter probably won't be satisfied until she's recognized as the world's top speed skater, and already plans to start training for the 2014 Winter Games in Russia.

After winning the silver medal, Reutter told her parents she'd donate the monetary value of both her medals, about $25,000, to her parents to remodel their basement. But Jay Reutter says they won't hold her to that pledge.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - March 01, 2010

One Economic Index Continues its Long, Slow Creep Up

It may be a long, difficult path to recovery for the Illinois economy according to one indicator.

Each month the University of Illinois Flash Index measures tax revenue to give a snapshot of the state's economic performance. Author Fred Giertz says in February the index inched up to 91.5 after two months at 91.2. The reading is well below the dividing line between growth and contraction, and it's been there for the last year and a half.

Giertz says corporate tax receipts in Illinois are showing signs that the recession is breaking, but that hasn't started translating into more employment.

"The stock market has gone up a lot in the last year because of expectations, and businesses are actually starting to do better," Giertz said. "But the problem is that they're not doing as much hiring now because more efficient during the downturn and they don't need as many people to produce the goods (and services) as they did in the past."

Giertz says many observers predict a very slow decline in unemployment rates over the next year, even as the economy improves.

Categories: Business, Economics, Education

AP - Illinois Public Media News - February 26, 2010

Danville Schools Fear as Many as 82 Job Cuts in Next Budget

Class sizes will be larger in Danville - and the preschool program would be drastically cut - if proposed budget cuts go into effect.

Administrators propose eliminating 26 teaching positions as well as five teaching assistants and three administrators in the high school and middle schools. The cuts would save close to $2 million. The cuts would also include supplies, textbooks and some extracurricular activities with low participation.

Superintendent Mark Denman says the biggest hit will be in Danville's preschool program, which is not mandatory for districts to offer except for special education.

"I do think the state will come through and provide some level of funding for preschool," Denman said. "But unfortunately, with the laws set by the state with budgeting and notice to staff, we have to make our decisions in March. If we don't, then we're obligated to provide the programs whether the state gives the money or not."

Demnan says 42 teaching and other positions would also be lost until the district is sure the grants that pay for those positions will be continued. He says the state owes District 118 nearly two-and-a-half million dollars in backlogged payments.

Categories: Economics, Education

AP - Illinois Public Media News - February 26, 2010

Champaign-Urbana MTD Tags Two Developing Subdivisions for Annexation

The Prairie Meadows subdivision in Savoy is among the areas that could be annexed into the Champaign-Urbana Mass Transit District later this year.

Managing Director Bill Volk says the CU-MTD Board has directed his staff to prepare annexation and legal notices for five areas. Public hearings will be held before the board takes a vote on annexation.

Prairie Meadows is the first major residential area of Savoy to be considered for CU-MTD annexation since the village and the transit district signed an agreement two years ago. Volk says that agreement protects some parts of Savoy from MTD annexation --- but not new residential areas.

"There are sections in Savoy that we cannot annex for 23 years, but other areas of Savoy, as they become annexable we are allowed per the agreement to annex that territory," Volk said.

The Stone Creek subdivision in southeast Urbana is also on the CU-MTD annexation list. Non-residential areas up for annexation include the Clearview commercial development site in northwest Champaign, some industrial tracts near the Apollo Industrial Park in north Champaign, and Willard Airport.

Volk says the CU-MTD Board will not vote on annexing the territories until after the next fiscal year begins July 1. If annexation is approved, property owners would not pay taxes to the MTD until the summer of 2012.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - February 26, 2010

Urbana Man Surrenders to Police after Six-Hour Standoff

An Urbana man was arrested Thursday at his apartment building, after a six-hour standoff with police. 57 year old Reginald Thurston is accused of holding a woman in his apartment, and striking an officer.

The incident started shortly before noon at Steer Place, a public housing apartment building on East Harding Drive. Building management had been contacted by relatives of the woman, who they believed was with Thurston. Management then called police, saying Thurston had been belligerent and made bizarre statements.

Urbana Police say that Thurston threatened officers, and struck one of them with a length of PVC pipe after he was pepper-sprayed. Thurston then threatened officers with a pellet gun and barricaded himself and the woman in his 6th-floor apartment.

Police SWAT teams were called in to help, and negotiators spent the afternoon communicating off-and-on with Thurston. Several other residents of the building were evacuated and Harding Drive was closed to traffic.

Police say Thurston surrendered peacefully shortly after 6 PM, and the woman with him was found unharmed.

Thurston faces charges of Aggravated Battery to a Police Officer and Unlawful Restraint.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - February 25, 2010

UI Administrator Under Fire from Pro-Chief Illiniwek Group

Some University of Illinois students are taking their demand for two administrators' resignations to another level.

Members of Students for Chief Illiniwek found email exchanges that they claim show administrators conspiring to stop a student-sponsored Chief performance at the Assembly Hall last fall. Members of the Urbana campus' student senate are looking over a resolution calling for an investigation of Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Renee Romano's involvement. And now the leader of a new group opposing Romano, Jerry Vachaparambil, says they may try to recruit help from state lawmakers.

"Because this is a public institution, they can admonish administrators for not acting in the best interest of the taxpayers or the students," Vachaparambil said.

Romano says the email exchanges were not meant to stifle students' right to free speech and assembly. She says they were a conversation between officials struggling with the on-campus performance in light of the U of I's decision to retire the Chief three years ago.

"Administrators often talk back and forth about, well, if we do this what's going to mean and how does that all work," Romano said. "But ultimately, they were able to have their event."

The Student Senate may vote next week on the resolution, which also targets Romano's associate vice chancellor Anna Gonzalez.

Categories: Community, Education

AP - Illinois Public Media News - February 25, 2010

Governor Launches State Budget Website

A Web site detailing Ilinois' financial outlook is now up and running. Governor Pat Quinn's office unveiled the site Wednesday.

The Website, budget.illinois.gov, opens with a video from the Governor's budget director ... David Vaught, who asks viewers, "Would you cut money from education and give more to health care? Or would reduce spending to both and spend more on road construction? Would you raise taxes? And by how much?"

Commenters can answer those questions ... or give other suggestions ... in a public comment section.

Vaught says within the first two hours ... about 250 people had done so. That's despite criticism that the graphs and figures don't make it easy enough for the average person to understand.

The site doesn't get into much detail about what the governor is planning. That will come March 10th, when Quinn gives his annual budget address.

But what it does include is telling. A reading of one table shows that the governor will suggest cutting more than two billion dollars in the next budget. Education ... from kindergarten to universities ... will have funding reduced, as well as public safety, economic development, and human services.

Vaught says it's dire, but realistic ... and says it still leaves Illinois with an 11 and a half billion dollars deficit.

Vaught says cuts will occur with or without a tax increase.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - February 24, 2010

Madigan Adds His Support to Eliminating IL’s Lt. Governor Office

Illinois lawmakers are advancing a plan to do away with the Lieutenant Governor's office, which has been vacant for over a year.

While there have been calls to abolish the position before, there's now a powerful backer of the idea. Democratic House Speaker Mike Madigan says the time has come. "Many over the years have spoken to the wisdom of eliminating the office," Madigan said. "I think this is an opportunity, and we should take advantage of the opportunity."

The often-ridiculed office has no official duties, only those assigned by the Governor. Madigan's plan would make the Attorney General the next in line in order of succession. The office of Lieutenant Governor has been under scrutiny since Scott Lee Cohen was forced to give up the Democratic nomination this month after allegations of violence against women surfaced.

Madigan's measure would take effect in 2015 and won't impact the upcoming election. A House committee has given approval over objections from Republicans concerned it could crowd out public initiatives on the fall ballot. The entire General Assembly must still pass it and 60 percent of voters would then need to agree for the change to occur.

Categories: Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - February 24, 2010

Culver Gets One Year Contract Extension in Unit 4

Champaign school superintendent Arthur Culver is guaranteed to keep his job through 2014 after a school board vote.

But Culver has volunteered not to take a pay raise as Unit 4 fights budget problems like most other Illinois districts. Tuesday night, board members evaluated Culver's performance and voted 4-3 to extend his contract one additional year.

Board president Dave Tomlinson says as a rule he had voted against extensions before. But he says Culver's work in bringing a nine year federal consent decree to an end merited a second look.

"There's one way the board can acknowledge to the superintendent that he has led us through probably one of the most difficult times in Unit 4, and that is with a contract extension," Tomlinson said.

Tomlinson says Culver and other administrators turned down raises last year even though their salaries are tied to the current teachers' contract, which called for 4% raises.

Categories: Education, Politics

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